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2007 12025b? 1 

California State Library 



Accession 1, 



...ARY. 






c.O.SVSAHn 

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PRICE 10 CENTS __ __ _..,___ «.ir»-i^i,. w $5.00 PER YEAR 

TAX PAYERS WEEKLY 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 192* 



LOS ANGELES 




One Hundred and Tenth Half Yearly Report 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 



SAVINGS 






(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 
526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 



COMMERCIAL 



DECEMBER 30th, 1922 

Assets — 

United States Bonds and Notes, State, Municipal and Other Bonds dotal 

value $26,247,091.00) standing on books al $24,412. 

Loans on Real Estate, secured In first mortgages 4h.'i2.V 

Loans on Bonds and Stocks and other Securities 1,142 

Stock in Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco I0H 

Bank Buildings and Lots, main and branch offices (value $1,200,000.00), 

standing on books at ...... 

Other Real Estate (value $70,000 00), standing on books al 

Employees' Pension Fund (value $400,613 hi) Handing on books at 

Cash on hand and in Federal Reserve Bank 8.084, 



825 57 
(.hi 10 
B5S hi 
oon oo 



I. •• 

I 041 
047 25 




Total . $80,671,102 "il 

Liabilities — 

Due Depositors $76. "21 .192 5.1 

Capital Stock actually paid up 1.000.000 oo 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2.750.000 00 

Total J80.67I.J92. 53 

JOHN A. BUCK, President GEO. TOURNY. Vict Prudent and ifanat" 

Subscribed and sworn to In-fore me this SOth day ol December, 1 "'22. 

[SE \l I (II VS. I ■-. Dl ISENBERG, Notary Public. 



Deposits made on or before January 10th. 1*2.4, will earn Interest from January 1st, I92J. 



A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER 4' i P«r cent per 
annum was declared for the six months ending December 31st, 1922 



- 




Cafe MarqiM?4l; : 

GEARY AND MASON^^tlEETS:] • ." 
Telephone Prospecfi 6j I* * « ." I ■ 

Visitors in San Francisco Delight in the 
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It Immediate 

m. S3.BS; 15011 



Edcson Phone Co. 6BcachSt,Dc P t * 




THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



ECZEMA 

IS ONLY SKIN DEEP 



and can be Instantly rel leved and quickly 
healed by the use of CRANOLEXE, the suc- 
cessful cranberry cream treatment for stub- 
born skin troubles. At drug stores, 35c and 
$1.00, or write for Free Test Treatment to 
Cranolene Company. Dept. 7 Girard. Kanaai 



St. Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUPERIOR 



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General 
Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 



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Surety 

Burglary 

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Insurance 



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105 MONTGOMERY STREET 



Manager 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY' 

NEW YORK 



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FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, WINDSTORM, 
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LIBERAL CONTRACTS REASONABLE RATES 



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A Newspaper made every day 

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Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for $1.15 a month- 
including Sunday editions 
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Few People Take Proper Care of Their Teeth 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once 

or tlfice a day is diking very good cure 
of them, Brushing is only a part of the 
process. .Many thine* can happen to your 
teeth Which only a competent dentist can 
take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you imagine. 
A toothache means trouble; do not unit 
for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy 
teeth faster than decay. Are your teeth 
sore? Do your gums bleed? Call in I inlay 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My 
nerve blocking system blocks oft" all nerves 
iiml pain. It will please you. 

DR. ff . W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAX FRANCISCO 

I'hnne Garfield 835 
SPECIALISTS — extractions; Crowns; 



Self 

and 



Cleansing Bridge 
Roofless Plates. 



Porcelain Work 



Independent Buyers' League 

furnishes its MEMBERS with 
ANYTHING sold at whole- 
sale at wholesale prices. 
Be a Member 

Independent Buyers' League 

833 Market St., Room 902 

I'd - Dougln* 1203-1204 



1140 Geary Street 



Tel. Franklin 3685 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining to Automobiles 

Oxy-Acetylene Welding — Blacksmtthing 

II. W. Culver ML Daberer I-., Johnson 



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DR. J. P. JUHL 



39 J 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1866 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. CII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.. SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 1923 



No. 1 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building. Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif.. Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill. E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE; — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

— Have you broken any of those new resolutions, as yet? 
¥ * ¥ 

— Breaking jail is now one of the chief winter amusements in 
California. 

— Yes, there are white peacocks, but what has that to do with a 
movie actress or actor changing nature over night? 

* * * 

— Government now holds up its head. It seems quite possible 
to make an attempt to convict criminals and crooked labor leaders, 
at last. 

— Politics is not always the funny thing it is cracked up to be. 

Witness the agony our present mayor must be in as to what office 

he should run for next. 

¥ * ¥ 

— The nomination of Harvey M. Toy so early in the day must 
have been some hard pill for Mayor Rolph to masticate. And look 
at those who were there! 

— When actresses unite in objecting to the strenuously robust 
love making in an actor we must admit that the stage is becom- 
ing quite a decent place. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The evidence given in the trial at Herrin shows that the killing 

of the free workingmen was one of the most atrocious murder- 

fests ever put over by union men and women. 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

— As long as the crop of candidates for the presidency of Poland 
exceeds those who are shot or bombed on assuming office we may 
expect Poland to be supplied with a chief executive. 

* ¥ ¥ 

— It is a good idea to make a good beginning but it is a far 
better idea to keep right on doing what is right without the neces- 
sity of any formal oath taking that you will persevere. 

* * * 

— And now India wishes to be free — it is proposed to call it the 
Federated Republic of India and to separate from the empire. Those 
who proposed this change have, however, so far failed to consult 

John Bull. 

* * * 

— And so the Hetch Hetchy dam is said to be nearly finished. 
That is it will soon be finished. That is a part of the great project 
carried forward, at so great an expense, by the city and county of 
San Francisco. 



— The news comes from Peking that Kermit Roosevelt made a 

failure of his tiger hunt and has gone out to try again. This is a 

chip off the old block but the Colonel would not have come back 

to report the failure. 

* ¥ ¥ 

— Mademoiselle Sorel says she adores Americans and that she 
"pins her main admiration on Boston." That French beauty has 
some level head. But you must remember she never saw California 
or San Francisco, which is a lucky thing for Boston. 

— Will Hays lifts the ban on Arbuckle. It is not a question as 
to whether Wills Hays feels weak in the hands of the big producers 
of films but it is a question as to whether the great mass of the 
people will ever forget the charge against Arbuckle of criminality. 

— Brisbane, the Piffle Philosopher, has evidently found it pays 
pretty well to write the "colyum" for William Randolph Hearst. He 
is rated as a rich man. The probability is that he has lost much 
of his radicalism in the transformation from a penny scribbler to 
a dollar writer. 

— No reward has as yet been offered for information leading to 
the discovery and conviction of those who helped the hammer mur- 
deress to escape from the Los Angeles bastille. It may be just an 
unimportant detail to know just who did help this woman to get 

away so very cleverly. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— Lost, strayed or stolen — a woman answering to the the name 
of Clara Phillips; broke jail in Los Angeles. Anyone having any 
information about her whereabouts will confer a favor on a curi- 
osity stricken public by sending such information to the chief of 

police of the City of Angels. 

¥ ¥ » 

— Attorney General Daugherty is reported as expressing satis- 
faction at the failure to make good by those who had charged him 
with several kinds of crimes in the impeachment proceedings. There 
was little to be accomplished apparently and it is strange that old 
Sam Gompers allowed himself to be so mislead. 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

— Clemenceau has gone back to the simple life, after having de- 
livered his message to the American people. It may be said the 
"tiger" was eminently successful, and because of the fact he has 
made thousands of Americans think seriously over the situation in 
Europe where previously they only thought they thought over it. 
There is a difference. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— With Harvey M. Toy. leading some of the decent citizens, with 
Eugene Schmitz, leading his friends, with Mayor Rolph also run- 
ning, with some labor unionists trying to lead the union forces and 
probably another candidate for the mayoralty, the race can be made 
mighty interesting for everybody. The Democracy has not yet made 
a choice of possible candidates for nomination but that will come 
and they may name a mighty good man, too. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 6, 1923 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




The ethical reasons preventing a doctor, or a 
Ethical Questions so-called respectable, self-respecting dentist, from 

using ordinary publicity methods or advertis- 
ing to reach the public, in order to find new patients, should be re- 
spected because they are time-honored and hoary-headed respecta- 
bilities. There is not one doctor in a thousand who would "stoop" 
to the use of printer's ink to create a practice for himself or to 
improve the practice he might already have. Is not that a beautiful 
idea? You see, the doctor is such a respectable cuss he cannot 
demean himself to that extent. It is a very strange fact, however, 
that this same doctor may pull off a commission on every prescrip- 
tion going to a certain drug store, or make money through the fact 
that he holds stock in the corporation running a certain hospital. 
The puzzle about this ethical question is to find out why the doctor 
is ethical when it is a matter of advertising to get patients and not 
at all ethical in his grab-bag methods of collecting from the drug- 
gist or making money out of the fact that he owns stock in a hos- 
pital to which he directs his patients for treatment, observation and 
operation. 



It would not be gracious in The News Letter if the 
The New Year wish were not expressed that the new year be a 

good and prosperous and happy one for our readers. 
And there is every reason why it should prove to be just what we 
wish it to be for the reader. Everything is set, as far as this country 
is concerned, that such a prosperous year as 1923 shall rarely have 
been experienced. However, so much depends on the individual in 
this that it must be pointed out he may to a very great extent make 
this year what he may wish it should be. He may make or mar. 
And, unfortunately, he is given to marring rather than making the 
most of his opportunities. It is true that he cannot absolutely con- 
trol matters in this regard but it is also true the human being is 
more apt, through anger and foolishness, to spoil things than he is, 
through calmness and wisdom, to bend events to his own use and 
create blessings for all of those around him. It is a happy and 
a prosperous new year we wish you and, with your help, we 
will try and make it just what we wish it to be for you and for us. 



We have been addressed by certain university stu- 
The University dents, who have taken exceptions to a recent edi- 
torial in these columns, to the effect that if a mil- 
lion dollars is available for the purpose of building a stadium, 
there are many other directions in which a part of that million, 
or some other million, might be used possibly to advantage. The 
point is made by the college man that the million for the building 
of the stadium is not furnished out of state funds but that it is 
found on the outside, it is made available through subscriptions to 
stock, or 'some such thing. That, however, does not at all affect 
the argument. The money is going to be spent for a stadium, in 
which will be exhibited all sorts of athletic exercises and notably 
the great football games of the year. Let it be understood The 
News Letter stands in favor of all kinds of athletic sports, but it 
does not stand for such sports if such patronage is going to mean 
that educational activities are going to be neglected on that account. 



What difference does it make where the money 
Where the Money comes from? It is going to be expended as a 
Comes From help to certain activity and it is going to be 

expended on college grounds and the stadium 
is going to be used by college men, and women, too, it is hoped. 
So it IS a college activity. The editorial in question was a very 



simple plea that other activities be not allowed to suffer on account 
of the super-expansion of the athletic bug. That is all. And the 
underlying reason for the editorial is to be found in the fact that 
all taxpayers of the state of California are practically stockholders 
in the University of California and that they have a perfect right 
to call anyone to task they have a mind to in the management of the 
great big educational institution they own. 



It is supposed that, as long as time and co- 
Women in Colleges education endures, there will be an endless 

disputation as to the merits or demerits of co- 
education. It will be taken for granted that co-education, as far 
as the grammar schools and the high schools are concerned, has 
proven itself a mighty good thing — beneficial in every respect. Then 
why is it that as far as colleges go there should be so many who 
will not agree that it is a good thing to educate young men and 
women in the same university? The opposition to the women in the 
universities seems to be growing. On one hand it is argued that 
the women show a better grade of scholarship but inquiry among 
the pedagogues does not bear out that contention at all. As far 
as scholarship goes the sexes seem to be about equally capable of 
accepting tuition and the average brings them to about the same 
level. Why is the opposition growing then among the men? It 
will probably be found that it is because such a large proportion 
of the women are what is known in colleges as "gold diggers." That 
is they have a very keen appreciation of the value of money and 
they set about to win only the attention of the men, in and out 
of college, who can afford to pay them attention. It is not easily 
understood why they object but that should be a cause for con- 
gratulation among the studiously inclined men in the colleges. 



When Mr. W. H. Crocker nominated Harvey M. 
Harvey M. Toy Toy for the office of mayor at the St. Francis 

hotel dinner last week he had 500 representa- 
tives of every walk of life in this city to listen to him and the re- 
port of the nomination reached a far larger audience in the press 
the next day. There seems to be quite an enthusiastic endorsement 
of Mr. Crocker's act among all of those who are staunchly Repub- 
lican in their politics and among other citizens who are not so 
outspoken as to where they may stand politically. Mr. Toy's reply 
to the nomination, after other speakers had endorsed the views 
held by Mr. Crocker, was modesty itself. There is no doubt what- 
ever that Mr. Toy would make a good mayor. He has the capacity 
of putting himself in touch with the interests of all citizenship of 
the metropolis and he has been very active in every line of civic 
work. He has furthered the success of the Victory highway; he 
has done exceptionally good work as the bay cities representative 
on the Naval Affairs Committee; he is the very life of the Portola 
revival. And, in the language of P. H. McCarthy, who was pres- 
ent when the nomination was made, "Harvey M. Toy is fit for any 
place you want to put him." 



The American plan has now had enough of 
The American Plan a tryout in San Francisco that we may speak 

of it as a complete success. It is so much of 
a success that instead of wages declining under its sway the scale 
has been increased in many of the crafts. The cry of the radical 
labor unionite closed shoppers that wages would be materially re- 
duced has been proven absolutely a false claim and one that was 
made to create a prejudice against the plan. And, while this is 
true, we must also say that the American plan does not dictate 



January 6, 1923 



AND TAXPAYERS WEEKLY 



what wages shall be at any time. Wages are established by eco- 
nomic conditions and demand and supply and nothing the unions 
may do ever makes any permanent difference except where an 
arbitrary and tyrannical scale is established and the force of union- 
ism or bossism is used to make that scale stick and take money 
from the employers unjustly or take wages from the men tyrannic- 
ally because there is, on either side, the power and the willing- 
ness to dictate. 



The wage scale in San Francisco is very high. 
The Wage Scale It is higher in some crafts than some of the em- 
ployers believe it should be. In most crafts the 
general public thinks the wage scale has been fixed too high by 
the board, to which such questions have been referred for settle- 
ment. The answer to both contentions is found in the fact that 
labor is very difficult to find a great deal of the time at wages 
the contractors are perfectly willing to pay and that wages are 
nearly always above the scale. Which goes to prove that it IS 
supply and demand that dictates what wages must be paid or 
what wages may be paid. 



The most satisfactory results, as far as the peo- 
Accomplishment pie are concerned, which has been accomplished 

through the application of the American plan, 
in most of our San Francisco industries, is found in the fact that 
we have established a long industrial peace. The employers' solidar- 
ity has made this possible. The labor union solidarity, as we have 
experienced it, always has made industrial warfare inevitable and 
right there is the big vital difference in results. 



Union domination in San Francisco in the hid- 
Union Domination eous industrial past has always meant a tyran- 
nical dictatorship under which a constant strug- 
gle was kept up and under which bitter wage disputes were the 
order of the day. And if disputing about wages had been the only 
thing to be complained about there might have been excuse for 
living under the rule of the union but when these disputes were 
coupled with long drawn out strikes and the strikes in turn were 
associated with countless cripplings, maimings, and murders and 
great money losses, inflicted on the community at large, then union 
domination became an odious thing to the people so tyrannized 
over by union thuggery. And union domination and tyranny and 
the cruelties practiced gave San Francisco of the past such a bad 
name in the world at large that union men themselves stayed away 
from here. Another of the big accomplishments of the American 
plan is found in the fact that union men are now coming back to 
San Francisco because in the American plan they know they will 
find security and permanence of employment. 



cast will then know it is safe to invest its money here and to send 
its men and women here to grow up with the city that is to be 
the great world metropolis. 



Mr. Woodrow Wilson is spoken about 
A Presidential Candidate? as a presidential candidate and it is be- 
ing said he aspires soon to take the ac- 
tive leadership of the unterrified Democracy. In the same breath, 
and by the same token, it is made manifest that Mr. Wilson is still 
the exponent of the idea of the League of Nations. There may be 
some mistake about the public's reason for having repudiated Mr. 
Wilson, at the time of the last election for the presidency, but the 
recollection is this same League of Nations matter had a great deal 
to do with this repudiation. However, we may all be wrong on this 
subject and it may be, too, the people have had a change of mind 
and heart, although this is doubted, and that they will endorse Mr. 
Wilson for the presidency on a platform having for its stoutest 
plank the League of Nations. It would certainly be a strange thing 
for the people to re-elect Mr. Wilson because he stood on the plat- 
form for the use of which they defeated him on his last attempt 
for office. 



There is plenty of room here for those 
San Francisco's Future who are free working men and women 

and those who owe allegiance to unions. 
There is plenty of room and plenty of work. And all those who 
are here know this work and this freedom is sure to be increased 
with the coming year and that we are going to see, under the 
American plan, an industrial era which has seldom been equalled 
in the west. The working out of the American plan by the capable 
men who have been handling its development in San Francisco 
has proven to the same working men and women that it is only . 
by co-operation the employer and employed can get along amicably 
and that industrial peace means the early return of that prosperity 
we are all looking forward to so eagerly, a prosperity union domi- 
nation, tyranny and oppression never has guaranteed at any time 
to any community in the whole wide world. And, finally, it should 
be remembered that the very best kind of an advertisement for 
San Francisco in the east is the published fact that the American 
plan has been adopted and is in force in San Francisco and the 



It is not at all a bad idea, which is being ad- 
Tax by Weight vanced, to tax motor vehicles by their weight. This 

sort of a tax would place the greater burden on 
the heavier machines and the trucks, which is just how it ought 
to be. Long ago the News Letter advocated some sort of an ad- 
justment of this kind and it is noted with pleasure the movement 
now on foot to bring about a more equitable treatment of those 
owning machines. In addition, it is proposed to raise revenue for 
the state by a tax of 1 cent a gallon on all gasoline used in motor 
propulsion over the state's highways. Here again this is a move in 
the right direction and places the tax quite fairly on those who 
mostly use the roads. 



A MYSTERIOUS DISAPPEARANCE 

At the quiet and mysterious hour of 2 in the morning it is said 
the waiters at the Palace on New Year's eve notified the guests as- 
sembled that the St. Francis hotel had been raided and to get rid 
of their liquor. Many tried to do so by drinking what refreshments 
were before them but by far the greater quantity found its way 
to the kitchen, being carried there by the waiters. The liquor seemed 
to offer no objection to thus being evicted from the tables but 
the great mystery is that, since this momentous and mysterious event, 
nothing has been heard as to the final fate of the spirits that cheer. 
It is supposed by some to have evaporated, induced to this condi- 
tion by the warmth of the kitchen quarters. 



— Mrs. Astor seems to be having a most lively session in politics 
in England. When the naturalized Britisher gets so excited that 
she smashes her opponent with the pep-ful phrase "You lie!" things 
are going some in the tight little island. The dispatch did not tell 
what the answer was that was made to this delightful little sally. 



The Sweetness 
of Low Prices 



Never Equals 



The Bitterness 
of Poor Quality 



We combine Quality, Price and Service 

JOHNSON BROS., Grocers 

Fillmore St. at Strrtnirnto — \i V«>or Command Phone We«t S4t 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 6, 1923 



IWfflBglHgHirafflHBlBBEKSH'KSSa-^SS 




roperty Owners ▼ 



insist on this. Street car service, quick inter-communication with 
other districts of the city, the owner should insist upon. 

These and a thousand other reasons are all of them arguments 
why the property owner should form some sort of an association 
having for its objects the working out of the problems facing all 
property owners and making possible an insistence on obtaining 
certain benefits the individual property owner might find it diffi- 
cult to obtain. 



ammo 



Rgal 



B 
1 

WITH the opening of the new year the property owner is faced 
with the same difficulties and the same opportunities that 
have faced him in the years gone by but it is hoped that he is now 
ready to meet these difficulties and opportunities in a better spirit 
than hitherto. 

It is to be hoped he has reduced the ownership of property to a 
business, just as he would reduce any barter in goods or lands 
to a business if he were engaged in such barter at all times. There 
is no reason — no good reason — to advance why ownership of prop- 
erty should not be conducted on purely business lines. 

If a man is in business, that is in business where there is the 
storage and the handling of large or small amounts of commodities, 
which are bought, sold and exchanged, and these goods are stored 
in salesrooms or warehouses, there is one thing a good business 
man does if he wishes to protect himself against a possible loss. 
He places insurance on the stock of goods in his store or in his 
warehouse. The property owner is in a like position and if he 
would protect himself fully against loss he should see to it that his 
improvements are insured to the fullest extent. It is almost un- 
thinkable that any man, owning a building, does not insure it. And 
yet this is a thing that has happened. It pays to insure your prop- 
erty and insurance is something you should look after very care- 
fully and quite frequently. You have deterioration, which must 
come to buildings that are tenanted as a natural consequence of 
tenantry. The insurance on your buildings should have your watch- 
ful attention at all times. 

Nothing deteriorates so rapidly as property to which the proper 
care is not directed and nothing responds so quickly as property 
which has the proper care given it to keep it fit. And it is not 
only as far as insurance is concerned that this care of property 
counts as an asset to the owner. It is an asset in nearly every other 
direction. Property properly cared for on a systematic basis repays 
the owner for the care that is bestowed upon it. Property which 
has as a systematic thing the proper care given to it is a much bet- 
ter rental value return property than that which has not the right 
care bestowed upon it to maintain it in as good a condition as nat- 
ural wear and tear will warrant. Property which has good care 
brings better rents. 

There is another way of looking at it, too, and that is found 
in the fact that well looked after property begets better neighbors 
than the slovenly appearing property. It is the same with property 
as it is with individuals. If one property owner is followed by 
another in letting property run down the whole neighborhood suffers 
and if one or more property owners insist in keeping up the stand- 
ard of their property the whole of the neighborhood is benefited 
thereby. Incidentally, if the whole neighborhood is benefited there 
is a reaction in favor of the few of the owners who have made the 
general tone of the neighborhood better. It is a give and take affair 
and there is no example of the benefit of co-operative action so 
easily demonstrable as beneficial as this. 

In another direction the owner of property may help himself 
and his neighbors. He must insist on having the streets in his lo- 
cality kept in good repair and he must demand that the best of 
paving be placed on them in the first place. Good streets are a 
great help to the owner who has property for rental purposes. An- 
other item the owner should not overlook is the lighting of the 
streets in the neighborhood where he is the owner of property. 
This lighting should be of the very best and property owners should 






"The King's Highway"— was 
the ONLY road to the South 
in the "Golden Days" of 
California "Before the 
Gringo Came," 

But today the SOUTHERN PACIFIC has 
two routes from San Francisco to the 
South — One the "Coast Line," which 
crosses and recrosses the historic EI 
Camino Real, following it closely 
through valleys, over mountains and 
along the shore; and the other, the 
"San Joaquin Valley Line" — through 
California's "Inland Empire" between 
the Sierra and the Coast Range. 

Over these two lines the Southern Pacific 
operates Seven Trains Daily each way, 
between San Francisco and Los An- 
geles. 



Our Agents will irlatl- 
ly rive you full iii- 
fornwtloD us to i [in- 
hikI Trtiin Service, 




January 6. 1923 



AND TAXPAYERS WEEKLY 




'A»-<fc6*>-'*fc&- < W»<a»r' 



- Olaf Skablan, descendant of Vikings, all of those northern 
squareheads, when they get into the limelight find a direct line of 
descent from some old Viking, is accused of being entirely too stren- 
uous in his stage love making and the girls of the company made a 
protest to the manager, Mr. Recat. That gentleman fired the man 
from the land of fiords and smoked herring. And then the actor 
turned and like the worm he bit and claimed a week's salary due 
him — yclept fifty simoleons of the Realm. And now comes for- 
ward the slumbrous-eyed voluptuous Slavic actress who alleges that 
Olaf's love making is never, or was not ever, too strenuous or rough 
for her. Blessed be the lovely Natacha, who says that Skablan is 
not too brutal in his love making. Skablan must have found this 
testimony to his liking and it is certainly refreshing to have 
a good looking girl come forward and make such a statement. 

— Speaking of kissing. There is a case of a man who was sent 
to fix and measure curtains, forcibly attempting to appropriate 
the kisses of his employer's wife. And now the said employer and 
his wife are suing this curtain raiser individual for the sum of $5000 
for damages, great mental pain, shock and humiliation. It is hoped 
the offending curtain man gets some sort of penalty meted out 
to him if the kissee can make a case against the kisser. If it be- 
comes impossible for a journeyman worker to visit a house to do 
repairs without kissing the landlady we have come to a pretty bad 
state of affairs in this country. 

* * -v 

— William Huff, enterprising jail breaker and ordinarily burglar, 
evidently was determined to have a pleasant Christmas outside the 
walls of the city prison and wiggled his way out. It was not ex- 
pected anyone could do that. There is an old story of a break 
from jail in San Francisco of a newspaper man who was placed 
under lock and key, soon after the city prison was built. The story 
is told that he sharpened a lead pencil flat and fitted this to the 
lock of his cell and got out. But the best part of the tale is found 
in the fact that, feeling badly over his escape, and imbibing freely 
of corn juice, he went back to the jailer and told him "what a 
rotten kind of jail you have." 

— A headstrong and imaginative tot in Oakland has on two oc- 
casions called out the police and the boy scouts to find her and 
return her to her frantic mother, after wandering around all night 
in the woods. The last time she was found on the top of Redwood 
Peak. The trouble here is not with the little girl but with the 
mother and it is to the mother the public should look that such 
things should not happen again. Many of our children are pun- 
ished or held up as horrible "enfants terrible" when it is their parents 
who should be disciplined for the acts of the children. It is usually 
thought too much trouble for fathers and mothers really to un- 
dertake to shoulder the responsibility that inheres in parenthood. 
¥ * * 

— The conviction at Needles of eight trainmen for conspiracy in 
the abandonment of trains last August as an attempt in restraint of 
trade is a move in the right direction. It is hoped that such con- 
victions will have the effect of driving home to the union labor rail- 
u.iy element the fact that the American people stand first in con- 
sideration with the courts. The time is fast going by when any 
union may autocratically lay down the law to the rest of the people. 



Announcing 
A MUCH NEEDED ARTICLE 

THE STANDARD 

"HOT BLAST" 

OIL BURNER 

Not merely a perfected substitute for coal — it is a 
vast improvement on coal 

It does the work of coal in a better and cheaper way, 
produces greater heat and eliminates all labor. It is a 
scientific gravity feed oil burner that burns light crude 
oil, fuel oil, distillate, kerosene or old automobile crank 
case oil. Is quiet, clean and healthful, fire and explosive 
proof. Does not smoke, soot, carbon or cause odors. Is 
the only wickless oil-vapor burner that can be turned 
up or down like city gas. Starts and stops at will, no 
priming required and is semi-automatic in its action. 
Comes absolutely complete ready for instant installation 
without any alterations in any coal stove, furnace 
or boiler and is built in different sizes for every 
requirement from the smallest coal stove to the heating 
plant of a 14-room house. Priced from $1S.50 up. 
A limited number will be delivered on their own merits 
on our special 30 day trial offer. 

Full information cheerfully sent upon request. 
Representation wanted everywhere, a unique plan for 
go-getters. 

General Oil Burner Company 

Dept. IS. YORK, PA. 



y 



Start the New Year RIGHT by ASSURING 
the protection of your FAMILY, in event 
of your 

death. through ;i STATE LIFE Monthly In- 
come Policy — $100 a month to your BKNI- 
FICIARY for LIFE — $100 a month to 
YOf. If disabled, and no more premiums 
to pay. 

ARTHUR J. HILL 

California Manager 

State Life Insurance Company of Indiana 

1026 Market St., San Francisco 



r 



n 



Let Mr. Hill tell you about it. Fill 
in this blank and mail it to him. No 
obligation entailed. 



I 



Name 



Address 

Age nearest birthday 






SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 6, 1923 



BBBSEESIgiS 




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BY CHANDLER MASON 



WILL HAYS, who lias been named the Czar of Filmdom, has 
apparently decided to resign his post as monarch of all he 
surveys, as far as the silver sheet is concerned. That is, it seems 
to a man up a tree that Czar Hays is no czar at all and that the 
pressure brought by those who have invested thousands of dollars 
in the capacity of a fat man and his antics to make one laugh 
must be obeyed and that the fat man must be reinstated "officially" 
so that the thousands of dollars of investment may not be lost to 
the producers of allegedly humorous films. 

To some people that may look to be all right and Will Hays and 
his smug statement that every man has a right to make good and 
should be given a time to make good in, may serve these people 
as a conscience balm when they take their children to see a re- 
pulsive individual go through ludicrous motions to cause them to 
smile and laugh. There is, however, a much more important ele- 
ment to consider in this reinstatement of this comic fat man. That 
element is the forcing of Arbuckle into the view of people who do 
not desire to view him at all. There is no doubt it was impossible 
to finally convict this man of the horrible crime of which he was 
accused but enough evidence was presented at that man's trial 
to convince anyone who attended it that his place now is not be- 
fore the people. 

Putting Arbuckle before grownups and before children is al- 
most a criminal act, because it flouts a message in the face of de- 
cency that the acts of such a man are forgiven and that they have 
been forgiven in advance by the official censor and manager of 
the film world in America. Allowing him to reproduce himself night- 
ly in a thousand and one places at the same time is simply to re- 
vive interest in the outrageous acts, which eventually lead to the 
death of the Rapp girl. To allow Arbuckle to come before the 
people again is to invite the repetition of similar crime by others. 
To place Arbuckle once more before the people is an insult to the 
intelligence and to the decency that is supposed to repose in the 
nation. 

It is not going to be Mr. Will Hays who will be the judge of 
what is right or wrong in this thing. The people themselves, those 
who form the audiences of the land at the film shows will do the 
judging as to whether it is right or wrong to allow this man to 
"come back" in this way. 

And, let it be said right here, no one objects to Arbuckle "com- 
ing back." That is any man's or woman's right and privilege, after 
committing a wrong or a crime. But there are ways and ways of 
coming back. Let the man come back as a butcher's assistant 
or as a plumber; he is said to be quite able in both directions. No 
one would quarrel with his "come back," no one would object 
to his demonstration of the fact that really he has a "come back" 
in him. 

He should not be allowed to "come back" in order to make good 
to the interests, who bet their money on him in the past. And that 
is exactly the kind of "come back" he is now expected to make. 

It was probably expected that the suave statement and the urge 
for a kind treatment of the fat man would have the effect of mak- 
ing the American people forget, but instead of forgetfulness in the 
face of the crimes charged as committed by Arbuckle we may now 
see a growing fury of resentment at the idea that the public could 



really forgive his participation in the awful orgy which culminated 
in his dragging a girl into his room and while in there treating her 
in such a manner that she shortly afterward died. 

Roscoe Arbuckle, after the earlier interest in his trial died down, 
went to Japan. What was it happened in Japan and why is it said 
he was arrested there? Was he put under restraint by the Japanese 
authorities because he insisted on following the straight and moral 
path in life? Was he placed in jail because he insisted on being 
modest and unobtrusive? Was he placed in restraint because he 
insisted on showing everyone how truly repentant he could be while 
abroad? 

Roscoe Arbuckle has been officially reinstated, but it is up to 
the people to accept or to reject this official act of Mr. Hays! It 
is now squarely up to the people to show that they do not care 
to have this man before themselves and their children continually, 
while he is going through the process of "making good" the money 
of those who invested in him when he was thought to be a decent 
human. 



RETIRE THE MONKEY GLAND 

It is the opinion of expert doctors that the monkey and goat 
gland craze will just die out naturally because the transplanted 
gland just lives its own life and will die and leave the re-glanded 
in a worse condition that before. Jaded and worn men and wo- 
men may not hope to replace their physical decay by planting 
within themselves the energy giving gland of the monkey or the 
goat. These glands do function but they only function just so long 
as they have life or there is energy producing qualities in the indi- 
vidual to whom the gland has been given. But let not the jaded 
ones give up all hope. There is hope of salvation for them. One 
Doctor Scammell of London, realizing the futility of gland trans- 
planting, now comes forward with the idea that potash in combi- 
nation with a radio-active solution, if taken into the human sys- 
tem, produces amazing results. Doctor Scammell has been experi- 
menting successfully for a long time in the radio-active treatment 
of the soil with the idea of restoring its lost crop creating power. 
Apparently, he has applied the same principles in the study of the 
restoration of the virility of youth to the broken down human. He 
says that the mixture he suggests does not prolong life but that it 
keeps people in an advanced middle age in a state of perfect health 
and efficiency. His experiments with people of advanced age show 
that they have recovered their vitality, while rehumatism, rheu- 
matoid arthritis, and nervous prostration were eliminated. 



— Little four-year-old Jimmy, being told to pray for his absent 
father, for his small brother who was ill, and the servant who had 
sprained her ankle, did so. But to his mother's astonishment he 
concluded as follows: "And now, God, please take good care of 
yourself, for if anything happens to you we'll all be in the soup." 



— The average life of a five dollar bill Is ten months and in 
dense centers of population only eight months. Around Christmas 
time in San Francisco it is about five minutes. 



January 6. 1923 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



THE MARKET STREET SYSTEM 

A gathering of citizens representing every interest of the people 
of San Francisco was recently called by Mayor Rolph for the pur- 
pose of advising our city fathers of the most immediate needed 
improvements for our city, and after a very lengthy meeting in the 
mayor's office, at which several matters of interest were recom- 
mended, particularly the unifying of our city transportation systems. 
To this it was unanimously urged that the special committee ap- 
pointed to consider the purchase of the properties of the privatel) 
owned company enter into negotiations immediately with the Market 
Street Railway Company, as the sentiments of the entire committee 
was that this was the first and most important issue towards in- 
creasing the population and providing a successful manner in tak- 
ing care of the same. 

It is now generally accepted by all those who have the interests 
of San Francisco at heart, that we should have a unified operation 
of the street car systems, so that all who ride on street car exten- 
sions could travel for one fare anywhere within the city; the neces- 
sary street car extensions could be made, for the development of 
various sections and for the growth of our city, and the intolerable 
conditions on Market street remedied. 

The privately owned company is prohibited from making ex- 
tensions. The city cannot now make these extensions because its 
lines do not sufficiently cover the city to connect up with the needed 
extensions. The franchises run through a varying period of many 
years to come — far too long for the city to be tied up and wait 
for extensions. If on the other hand the city now acquires the Mar- 
ket Street Railway Company while its franchises are still running, 
these extensions could be made, as required, and the properties of 
the privately owned company could be paid for out of their earn- 
ings. 



TWO FEATURES 

The News Letter financial column has always been noted for the 
truth of its prognostics and for the general soundness of its views 
as to world and California financial matters. It is the intention of 
the publisher, however, to improve this department and to that end 
more care will be devoted in the future to particularizing as to the 
expansion and development of San Francisco and California re- 
sources. The co-operation of banks and bond houses has already 
been had but it is the desire of The News Letter to make this co- 
operation of a more intimate and personal character in the future. 

A feature which is very closely allied to financial matters and 
the possibility of ensuring as far as possible the continued welfare 
of every citizen, regardless of class distinction, is the continuance in 
force of the American plan. The News Letter, as its readers well 
know, has always been a progressive periodical and always has 
advocated the American plan. For the future a strong advocacy will 
be continued and a policy for the expansion of the plan to spread 
itself in the state at large will be maintained. 

It is believed these two features will be appreciated by the mer- 
chants and the manufacturers. As far as the American plan is con- 
cerned there is, at present, no newspaper or periodical in San Fran- 
cisco devoting the space to any discussion of the advantages accru- 
ing to the community through its application and there is none 
which openly advocates the application of this principle of freedom 
to all industries anywhere and everywhere. The News Letter will 
occupy the position henceforth of being the outstanding champion 
of those who are fighting to maintain their freedom industrially and 
socially. 



A BUILDING IN SANTA CLARA 
A three itory building to cost $M8.(MVi) , s to be erected on the 

University of Santa Clara campus and the contract for this has 
been awarded to James M. Sampson of San Francisco, whose office 



is in the Monadnock building. The new building is to be used for 
a chemistry and physics laboratory, besides being utilized for 
draughting rooms. Mr. Sampson is well known as a most reliable 
and conscientious builder and the university is to be congratulated 
on having him as the builder of the new addition to the university. 
The building will be known as Alumni Science Hall. 



A FRIEND OR TWO 

There's all of pleasure and all of peace 

In a friend or two; 
And all your troubles may find release 

With a friend or two; 
It's in the grip of the clasping hand. 
On native soil or in alien land, 
But the world is made — do you understand? — 

Of a friend or two. 

A song to sing and a crust to share 

With a friend or two; 
A smile to give and a grief to bear 

With a friend or two; 
A road to walk and a goal to win, 
An inglenook to find comfort in, 
A pipe to smoke and a yarn to spin 

With a friend or two. 

A little laughter, perhaps some tears, 

With a friend or two; 
The days, the weeks and the months and years, 

With a friend or two; 
A vale to cross, and a hill to climb, 
A mock at age, and a jeer at time — 
The prose of life takes the lilt of rhyme 
With a friend or two. 



THK 



CROCKER NATIONAL BANK 



OK SAX FRAX1 1st u 



( OM1ITION XT THK CLONE OK lll»IM.» lllclMIII.lt 80, 

im 

HKMIt lt( I - 

Loans and Discounts .$24,641,41 

r 8, Bonds and Certificates li 

Other Bonds and Securities 

Capital Stmk in Federal Reserve I:. ink ..f 

Pram 160, I 

Customers' Liability under Letter* -f Credit 

Cash and 8lghl Exchange . l-'.i i» 680.18 

149.8(12.819.05 

I i inn itii > 
al 
surplus ami Undivided Profits 

Circulation - 

Letters .-f '-re.iit 2, ".i* ! 

1 >.■!>.. 

J19.R" 



.las. J. Fagan.Vlce-Pres. 
XV. Gregg. Ylce-Pres 
.1 B McCargar. Vic* 
Win XV Crocker, Vice-Pres. 
K ' ; Willis. Cashier 
-. xv Bbner As* cashier 
B Iv Ivan. Asm Cashier 



OFFII 1 K~ 

xv.M II CROCKER, President 

.1 M. Masten. Asst Cashier 
I' .1 Murphv. Asst Cashier 

shier 
XV 1 1 [ shier 

" tshier 
Mrt. Fren 
H H Haight.Asst MgT.Fl 



G Feris Baldwin. Atfi i 

BOARD Of OIRt I TI1K- 

xv, i ii Cracker Irso 

Tempi- r R S M 

reen 1 B MrCarg-ar 

x G Griffin am W Crocker 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 6, 1923 



THE PAPER PRICE PLOT 

Nearly all of the big paper manufacturing and dealing concerns 
in the Pacific Coast have been made subject to a formal complaint, 
issued at the behest of the Federal Trade Commission at Washing- 
ton. The charge is made there is collusion among all of those 
against whom the complaint is directed. The main charge is that 
of unfair business practices. It is alleged that through the Pacific 
States Paper Trade Association and its officers and members, whole- 
sale paper prices are maintained and competition is thus entirely 
eliminated. 

It is hoped that, having made this charge, the Federal Trade 
Commission may be able through its attorneys to make it good when 
the case cones to trial, which will be very shortly. 

Incidental to the general complaint a specific charge is made 
that if paper manufacturers or dealers do not maintain prices in 
accord with their co-members these independent dealers are then 
classed as "illegitimate." It is supposed that being illegitimate must 
mean the application of all kinds of coercion to cause the offenders 
to come back into the protected fold of the association, forswear the 
sin committed and pledge themselves to sin no more. At any rate, 
anyone on this coast using paper in the regular run of business 
feels that there must be some sort of co-operation or collusion to 
maintain prices and while he cannot know that such a collusion 
does exist and that such unfair practices are vogue, any action by 
the Federal Trade Commission which will clear the situation is most 
welcome to all printers and publishers. 

For a long time there have been murmurs of revolt against the 
makers and dealers in paper and, here and there, users of paper 
stock have actually revolted and have tried to obtain paper at a 
price which they considered more reasonable. Much paper has been 
imported; some paper has been bought in the eastern paper mak- 
ing centers and then shipped here. As to the imported paper there 
is always the objection that there is little variety to select from and 



that stocks on hand at the dealers give out and as to the practice 
of dealing directly with the eastern mills, there is the objection 
that time and distance act as embargoes. Sometimes, too, an eastern 
mill will not take an order for paper to be delivered on this coast, 
on account of having a local agent whose business conduct is alleged 
to be ruled by the conditions laid down by the Pacific States Paper 
Trade Association. 

Those who use printing paper in any quantity at all know that 
it is useless to attempt to obtain a better price from one manufac- 
urer or dealer than from another and they sense the fact that some- 
where or somehow there is an agreement and this pact is made 
strong enough to prevent any manufacturer or dealer breaking it, 
even in the slightest degree. Those using paper in any quantity and 
for any purpose whatsover are convinced that prices for paper of 
all kinds are too high and that there is no excuse which may be 
advanced that is valid or that explains away an ugly looking and 
very trying situation. So the probe is welcomed and it is hoped 
the Federal Trade Commission has the evidence to back up the 
charge that has been made in its complaint. 



A NOTABLE GONE 

With the death of Faxon D. Atherton recently another of the 
notables who were connected with the earlier development of the 
banking industry in California has passed into the beyond. Mr. 
Atherton came from a family which has always stood in the fore- 
front in the history making period in California. He was the son 
of Faxon D. Atherton, after whom the town of Atherton was named. 
The elder Atherton was connected with railroading in the days of 
its beginning in California. Faxon D. Atherton is survived by a 
son, a well known architect, a daughter, Mrs. Olga Atherton Mullen 
of Los Angeles; and his sister, Mrs. Enrique Edwards of Valpa- 
raiso, Chile. Atherton's brother George was the husband of Ger- 
trude Atherton, the writer. 



A New Year's Resolve 

TURN OVER A NEW LEAF WITH THE NEW YEAR BY USING 

The KLIPTO Patent Ledgers 

Admitted by experts in the trade to he the hest that lias been placed on the market 
THE ULTIMATE ACHIEVEMENT 

THE LIGHTEST BOOK MANUFACTURED 

ENSURES SECURITY WITH SPEED 

MAKES BOOKKEEPING A COMFORT 

Will Open or Close in Ten Seconds. Always Closes According to Sheets in Binder. 

No Metal Posts or Corners to Mar Desks. Will Hold Securely 1 Sheet or 1,000. 

Weight One-Half of Conventional Makes. Provides Flat Writing Surface. 

Can Be Made in Any Size or Binding. 

KLIPTO LEDGERS ARE MADE TO FIT ALL 
STANDARD LEDGER AND COLUMNAR SHEETS 

Made on the Coast 

AT ALL THE LEADING STATIONERS 

"KLIPTO" Loose Leaf Manufacturing Co. 



220 LEIDESDORFF STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



January 6. 1923 



AND TAXPAYERS WEEKLY 



II 



I Have You Heard It? 

— "I am sorry, Mr. Portly," apologized the boarding house keep- 
er, "but 1 have no cheese in the house. . 

"Pray do not mention it, Mrs. Phipps," said the genial old boy. 
"I'm sure 

His little compliment was cut short by the small son of his hos- 
tess, at his side, bearing a piece of cheese upon a plate. 

"Well, now, that is very kind of you, little man," he said, as 
the child stood there, watching him swallow the tit bit. "You knew 
more than mother that time. Where did you find the cheese?" 

The youngster intently watched the last morsel disappear before 
he answered: 

"I found it in the rat-trap." 

* * * 

— A man who had just opened a store in a strange town was in- 
terrogating one of his early customers on the purchasing power of 
the citizens. "Now, there's Deacon Brown," he said. "He has the 
reputation of being wealthy. Would he be likely to spend much 
money in here?" "Wa-al," drawled the native reflectively, "I 
wouldn't exactly say that he'd go to hell for a nickle, but he'd fish 

around for one till he fell in." 

¥ * * 

— Pat Dennis got a temporary job in Golden Gate park, San 
Francisco. Armed with a large sack he was sent about the park 
to retrieve fallen leaves and twigs. It was autumn and Pat was 
kept a little too busy for his comfort. One day he was called to 
the superintendent's office, told that his job would be made per- 
manent, and handed a special officer's star, with instructions to al- 
ways wear it in a prominent place, to respect it, and warned to 
keep busy. 

"Sure," says Pat, "it's to the ground me nose has been kept 
since I've been here, like a worried foxhound, and it is a prominent 
place ye want for the star, it will have to be the seat of me trousers, 
I'm thinking, with all respect to it." 

* ■* * 

— Bobby was at a children's party, and he simply couldn't re- 
sist the temptation to indulge in a great deal more of the things on 
the table than were good for him. At last he had to give up; he 
was feeling more and more unhappy every moment. 

His hostess, seeing how pale he looked, asked him if he felt 
ill and would like to be taken out in the air for a while. 

"Oh, yes, please," said Bobby, in a weak and solemn voice; 
"carry me out, but don't bend me. 

* * * 

— A furrier was selling a coat to a lady customer. 

"Yes, ma'am," he said, "I guarantee this to be genuine skunk 
fur that will wear for years." 

"But suppose I get it wet in the rain?" asked the lady, "what 
effect will the water have on it? Won't it spoil?" 

"Madam," answered the furrier, "I have only one answer. Did 
you ever hear of ■ skunk carrying an umbrella? 

* * * 

— A popular minister was also an enthusiastic golfer, and on 
one occasion he was greatly upset at the loss of a match game, 
which until near the end seemed entirely his. 

His defeat worried him considerably, and on the following Sun- 
rJay, he rose in the pulpit to announce his text, which »ery solemnly 

he gave OUl as: "What shall it profit .i man il he gain the whole 
world and lose the last hole?" 



THE BANK REPORTS 

This week The News Letter presents the reports of the banks to 
its readers. It is with pleasure attention is drawn to these because 
of the fact that they are so very favorable as indicative of the 
splendid business being done by the banks. Especial notice is drawn 
to the statements of the San Francisco Savings and Loan Society, 
the Federal Trust Company, the Bank of Italy and the Union Trust 
Company. All the banks of San Francisco are in a fine condition, 
but these reports show the exceptional standing of the banks so 
reporting. 



OLD CHRISTMAS 

Eldridge G. Snow is one of the most noted men in San Francisco, 
who is engaged in the insurance line, and because of this fact is 
very favorably known to the business world. This Christmas Mr. 
Snow has sent to his friends a perfectly fitting and beautifully il- 
luminated greeting entitled "Old Christmas." Space forbids the 
lengthy description this deserves at our hands and News Letter 
leaders who have not had the opportunity of seeing Mr. Snow's 
kindly remembrance or having the pleasure of possessing this ar- 
ticle and literary treasure, have missed much. 



C. H. BENTLEY PASSES 

The obsequies of C. H. Bentley were held on Monday. Mr. 
Bentley died while in attendance at a football game on Saturday 
afternoon. Mr. Bentley was one of the best liked men in the 
business world of San Francisco and he will be missed by a very 
large circle of friends and acquaintances, besides innumerable 
others who knew him through business relations. His mother, wid- 
ow and two daughters, Florence and Margaret, survive him. One 
son, Wilder, and one sister. Miss Mary I. Bentley, reside with the 
mother in Berkeley. 



REPORT OF CONDITION OF 

THE ANGLO & LONDON PARIS 
NATIONAL BANK 

OF BAR FRANCISCO 
AT Till-'. CLOSE OP in -ivi — lil 'I Mill li 19, III.' 



Ill Mil HI I v 

Loans and i Hsoounts 

r s Bonds t" Secure Circulation 

Othei r s Bonds and Certificates 

Bonds and Securities 

Other Assets 

Customers' Liability <*n Letters »r Credit and Ac- 

Irafts in Transit 
i 'ash and SIeIii Bxchangl 



$49,761 

I 



II IHII.ITII 18 

Capital Stock 

Surplus ami Undivided Profits 
itlon 

Rediscounts With I I v.- Hunk 

Hills Payable against Goverami 
Bonds Borrowed 
Other Liabilities 
Letters "f Credit 



Jin-. 
* 5 





















in I II I KM 



H HUBERT FLEISHHACKER I -resident 



Mortimer Fleishhacker. V-I*. 
.1 Knrdlander. Vicr- 
C. F. Hunt. Vlce-Pree. 
Harry Coo, Vice-Pres- 
W E Wilcox. V-P.. Cashier 
.1 W Lilienthal Jr.. V-Pres 
Fred F. Ouer. Asst. V-Pres 
Victor Kllnker. Asst V-Pres 

.1 \V Hi • V-T'res 

F I. 



' 

I. .1 ' 

F .1 H.-aeUnd. A 

\ I: 

hter 



V-P 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 6, 1923 




ociot 




BUSY CUPID 

CLAMPETT-SHUMAN. — News of the marriage of Miss Cor- 
nelia Clampett and Mr. William Shuman, which took place 
last Friday evening at Bronxville, New York, reached San 
Francisco by telegram the day of the marriage. The bride, 
at the time of her marriage, was the guest of her uncle and 
aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Baxter. Mrs. Henry White, for- 
merly Miss Jean Wheeler, of this city, attended the bride as 
matron of honor, and Mr. William Pritchett of Oxnard, Eng- 
land, acted as the groom's best man. 
BUCKBEE-BOYDEN. — Miss Margaret Buckbee, whose engage- 
ment tp Mr. John Boyden was announced some months ago, 
has chosen April 4 as the date of her marriage. The wed- 
ding will be celebrated in the evening, and following the 
ceremony, which will be solemnized in church, a reception 
will be held at the Buckbee home in Pacific avenue. Further 
details have not yet been decided on. 
SMYTH-FORD. — At the home of her parents. Mr. and Mrs. George 
H. Smyth, in Berkeley, Miss Helen Smyth became the bride 
Saturday evening of Mr. Norman Waterlow Ford of this city. 
The ceremony was performed at 9 o'clock, Rev. E. P. Ben- 
nett of Oakland officiating. 
HOPKINS-POND. — Miss Lillian Hopkins has decided upon Jan- 
uary 27 for the date of her marriage to Edward Bates Pond. 
The wedding will take place at the Sherwood Hopkins home 
on Jackson street at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, and will be 
followed by a small reception and buffet supper. There will 
be about a hundred guests to include members of both fam- 
ilies, as well as a group of the most intimate friends of the 
young couple. Miss Hopkins will have her sister, Mrs. Wil- 
liam Gregory Parrott I Gertrude Hopkins) as her matron of 
honor and only attendant. Henry Howard is to be best man. 
McGINN-I'HL. — News of the marriage of Miss Helen McGinn, 
daughter of Mrs. George W. McGinn and the late George W. 
McGinn, to Edwin Howard Uhl, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence 
Uhl of Vacaville, comes as a delightful surprise to their 
friends. The young couple were married on Tuesday even- 
ing. December 26, at S:30 o'clock in the McGinn apartments 
on Sacramento street. Rev. Dr. Carl Bent read the ceremony, 
immediately after which the bridal couple left for Southern 
California on their wedding tour. 
KING-BAKEWELL. — The wedding of Miss Hazel King and Mr. 
John Bakewell Jr. was solemnized December 28 at the Oak- 
land home of the bridegroom's father. Rev. John Bakewell. 
by whom the wedding service was read. Rev. Mr. Bakewell 
is advanced in years and not strong enough to cross the bay, 
so it was decided to hold the ceremony at his home. The wed- 
ding was very simple in arrangement and only the immediate 
members of the two families were present. They included the 
bride's mother, Mrs. Homer S. King; Miss Genevieve King, 



Mr. and Mrs. Frank King, Miss Harriett Bakewell, Miss Anne 
Bakewell, Mr. Walter Bakewell and Mr. Vail Bakewell. 

BALDWIN-KELLY. — The eastern bridal attendants of the Bald- 
win-Kelly wedding. Miss Alice de Lamar, Miss Evangeline 
Johnson and Miss Geraldine Hall, arrived in de Lamar's pri- 
vate car. They were accompanied by Miss Elizabeth Ramsey, 
who will be a guest at the wedding. Directly after the wed- 
ding the little coterie of young girls will return to the east. 
The Sproule home in Sacramento street, which was formerly 
the Whittell residence, and is one of the most charming homes 
in the city, has recently been redecorated and remodeled. One 
of the large lower rooms has been made the dining room, 
off of which a most attractive garden room opens. Follow- 
ing the nuptials of Miss Marie Louise Baldwin and Mr. Eu- 
gene Kelly a wedding luncheon will be served at the Sproule 
home, which will be attended by a limited number of guests. 
Hundreds of invitations have been issued to the ceremony. 

BOARDMAN-VAN WYCK. — Miss Mary Boardman, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. George C. Boardman. will become the bride of 
Oze Van Wyck on Tuesday evening, January 9, at 9 o'clock. 
Dr. Charles Gardner of Stanford University will read the 
ceremony. Mrs. Ernest Gunther. formerly Miss Helen Si. 
Goar, is to be matron of honor, Miss Helen Lynch maid of 
honor and Miss Kate Boardman and Miss Marie Luise Meyer 
bridesmaids. Lazar Marks is to be best man. 
LVXCHEOXS 

JENKINS. — Mr. and Mrs. Reginald Jenkins entertained at a 
luncheon Sunday in the San Mateo Polo Club when they were 
hosts to sixteen guests. Miss Marie Louise Baldwin and Mr. 
Eugene Kelly, whose marriage will be an event of Saturday, 
were the guests of honor. 

FORD. — Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Ford entertained fourteen of 
their friends at a luncheon party at the Burlingame Country 
Club Monday. 

TEAS 

Bt'TTLER. — Mrs. Robert Kelly and Mrs. Wynne Van SchaicU 
shared the honors at a reception given in the Century Club 
by Mrs. Walter Cathcart Buttler. More than 100 guests were 
bidden to the function. 

DINNERS 

DE LAVEAGA. — Mr. and Mrs. Edward I. de Laveaga entertained 
at a dinner on Friday evening at their home across the bay- 
in honor of Ensign and Mrs. Raleigh Hales, whose marriage 
was a recent social event in San Diego. Mrs. Hales is a niece 
of Mrs. de Laveaga and prior to her marriage was Miss Con- 
stance Gibson of San Diego. 

GASSNER — Mr. and Mrs. Louis Gassner celebrated their silver 
wedding New Year's evening by giving a large dinner at 
the St. Francis. 

FLOOD. — Mr. and Mrs. Flood entertained at a dinner Thurs- 
day at their home, Miss Marie Louise Baldwin and Mr. Eu- 
gene Kelly being the guests of honor. Forty guests, most of 
them relatives of the betrothed and the members of the bridal 
party, were at the dinner. 

TAYLOR. — Mr. and Mrs. Augustus Taylor were hosts at a de- 
lightful dinner party at their home on Gough street Sun- 
day night, incident to the New Year's eve ball at the M. H. 
de Young home on California street. 

GRANT. — Tuesday evening the Misses Josephine and Edith Grant 
entertained at a dinner party for the Baldwin-Kelly bridal 
party. 




Under the guidance of R. H. Collins 
and his associates, the Peerless was 
bound to be a better and better Peer- 
less. The public response came quick- 
ly and is indicated by augmented sales 
in old Peerless strongholds and 
throughout the country in general. 

Pioneer Motor Company 

OP SAN FRANCISCO 

1900 Van Ness Ave., Corner Washington St. 

Telephone Proepect 8800 



Hotel Del Monte 

Make Your Reservations 
at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 0180 

Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



The Brute — I think that women are much 
better looking than men. 
She— Naturally. 
The Brute — No; artificially. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 

Van Ne»s Ave., at Henry Street 

SAN FKANCISCO 

Is the most refined family hotel in the city 

;i home unsurpassed 

ELMER M WOODBURY 



When they are finished 

youi glasses will be exactly as ordered 

— lenses of finest quality, material the 

best and they will be comfortable and 
stylish. It's a great satisfaction to know 
thai when w e make your glasses they 
will he absolutely correel in every detail. 



w. 



I>. Feniilmore A. K. I*'e n it I m ore 

J. W. I>uvU 




mm 



Han iTnn.'i.i.-., - 181 l'ont, '-•..iim MUvlon SU. 
Berkeley - - - 2 100 ttlmttuck Aveutie 
Oukhmd 1221 Broadway 



January 6, 1923 



AND TAXPAYERS WEEKLY 



13 



NEW VE Alt PARTIES 

McNEAR. — Mr. and Mrs. John A. McNear and their son, Mr. 
Cyril McNear, entertained their friends at an informal party 
Monday afternoon, which was one of the most elaborate 
affairs given in town in celebration of the New Year. 

WINTERBERG. — Among the affairs held in town Sunday dur- 
ing the afternoon and evening in celebration of the New Year 
was a party given by Dr. and Mrs. Walter Winterberg at 
their home in Broderick street. 

RERLE, — The officers' club at the Presidio was the scene Mon- 
day evening of an enjoyable New Year's dance, which was 
largely attended by service people and many guests from 
town. Among the hosts of the evening Major and Mrs. Charles 
K. Berle entertained at a dinner at their home in Green 
street, later attending the dance with their guests. 

TORCHIANA. — One of the truly old-fashioned affairs on New 
Year's eve was the informal "at home" which Consul of the 
Netherlands Henry Van Coenan Torchiana and Mrs. Torch- 
iana gave in their apartments on Scott street. 

LICIITENBERG. — The four Lichtenberg sisters, Mrs. Gustavus 
Ziel, Mrs. Alfred Wagstaff DuBois, Mrs. Henry Disbrow John- 
son and Miss Marie Lichtenberg, whose charming old home 
at San Rafael is one of the most popular in Marin at all 
seasons af the year, held open house New Years. 

BAILLY. — Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Edward Bailly gave a New 
Year's day party for the young friends of their children, the 
Misses Jean, Barbara and Doris and Edward Jr. 

FLOOD. — Mr. and Mrs. James Flood and their daughter. Miss 
Mary Emma Flood, were at home to their friends New Year's 
day, as were also Mrs. Ethel Hager, Mr. and Mrs. Mark Ger- 
stle and Dr. and Mrs. Cullen Welty. At the home of Dr. 
and Mrs. T. E. Bailly, in Laurel street, their young daugh- 
ter. Miss Jean Bailly, and her cousin, Miss Stella Stevens, en- 
tertained at an informal dance between the hours of 3 and 
7 p. m. 

MARTIN. — Mrs. Eleanor Martin, who has always kept "open 
house" on New Year's day, followed her long established cus- 
tom Monday, afternoon, when she was greeted at her home 
in Broadway by her many friends. 

HATHAWAY. — Miss Mabel Hathaway gave a house party at the 
Hathaway home at Pebble Beach. From town, her guests 
were Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Short, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred J. 
Oyster, Mr. and Mrs. George Wolff, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer 
Jennings, Miss Isabel Jennings and a number of others. 

CAMERON. — Following the delightful custom they inaugurated 
a number of years ago, Mr. and Mrs. George Cameron and 
Mr. and Mrs. Nion Tucker entertained at a New Year's cab- 
aret and dance at the home at the young matron's father, 
Mr. M. H. de Young, in California street. 

McGOWAN. — One of the large New Year's day receptions that 
brought together service and civilian friends of Mr. and Mrs. 
George McGowan was held at the Fairmont hotel on Mon- 
day. Approximately 200 friends called. Mrs. McGowan was 
assisted by her two daughters, Mrs. Lyman K. Swenson and 
Mrs. Christopher Buckley. 

BAIXS 

MOORE. — The last of the winter's debutantes, Miss Mary Ber- 
nice Moore, made her formal bow to the social world at a 
ball given December 29 at the Hotel St. Francis by her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Moore. The delightful affair 
had its setting in the Italian and Borgia rooms and Colonial 
ballroom of the hotel. The square entrance hall lo Hip rooms, 
where Mr. and Mrs. Moore and their daughter, assisted by 
Mr. and Mrs. Dean Dlllman, received Hie guests, was hanked 
with brightly flowering potted plants, a background being 
formed of tall ferns and palms. 

ARTISTS BALL. — The Four Arts hall will he given by the ar- 
tists of California on January in, at the Fairmont hotel. The 
Fairmont terraces will be especially decorated in a novel and 
beautiful way by the artists and an original system of il- 
lumination will be carried out. Many notables have been in- 
vited as guests of honor and responses from them indicate 
tin' interest that the ball has created as all of them will be 
there, many with parties of friends. The ball will be a tanC) 
dress affair, with formal custom as an alternative 
IX TOWN AMI OUT 

BRAY.— MrB, RoBwM Augustus Bray and Mrs Charles Teague 
returned early in the week from the Allan' where 

they have been tor several months. They made the trip home 
by way ol Panama on the steamship EScuador. 

JONES.— Mr, and Mrs. Paul Jones and a party of young people 
spent New Years in Truckee, where the] enjoyed the winter 
sports. 

GOLDARACENA. — Mr. Orel Ooldaracena anil Mr. Leon Brooks 
Walker returned Tuesday from Pebble Beach, where they 
passed the week end al the Willis Walker log cabin. 

lit: LAVEAGA 'Ph.- de Lavegas have taken the John J- Valen- 
tine home in Pledmonl tor the remainder of the » inter. 



HART. — Mrs. Benno Hart and her daughter, Mrs. Cameron Ells- 
worth Wylie, who has been at the Chatham in New York, 
are expected home today. They went east to pass the holi- 
days with Benno Hart Jr.. who is a student at Amherst. 

PEIRCE. — Mrs. Cyrus Peirce and Miss Eloise Peirce are at 
Weisbaden for the midwinter. Later on they will go to the 
south of France, returning here next fall. 

WRIGHT. — Mr. and Mrs. H. Earle Wright (Viola Buck) have 
returned from Vancouver and the northwest, where they 
passed their honeymoon. They are temporarily at the Hotel 
Bellevue until their new apartment on Sacramento street is 
ready for them. 

INTIMATIONS 

PILLSBURY. — Mrs. Horace D. Pillsbury is planning an eastern 
trip shortly and expects to remain away for a month or 
longer. 

HUETER. — Mr. and Mrs. Ernest C. Hueter are receiving the 
congratulations of their friends on the birth of a son, whom 
they will call Robert Claus Hueter. Prior to her marriage 
Mrs. Hueter was Miss Loretta Boyd of Sacramento. 

GERSTLE. — Mrs. William L. Gerstle and her daughter, Miss 
Miriam Gerstle, will leave here on January 9 for London. 
Miss Gerstle will be married in the spring to Godfrey Pope, 
a young English lawyer, whom the Gerstles met on a tour 
of the world. 

AT DEL MONTE 

— The New Year holidays were unusually gay at Del Monte 
and there were more guests there than in many years. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lawrence W. Fox Jr. came back with the group they 
chaperoned, which included Miss Mary Julia Crocker, Miss Law- 
ton Filer, Miss Mary Martin and a complement of men. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Samuel F. B. Morse are also home, having 
passed the last few days at Pebble Beach with Mr. and Mrs. 
Francis McComas. who were their guests over the Christmastide. 
Others in the party were Mrs. Jane Selby Hayne and Mr. Harry 
Hunt. 

— Mr. Richard Schwerin was among those to be at the Hotel 
del Monte over the week end, and he took an active part in the 
polo games which were a feature of the holiday entertainments. 
He has joined his mother, Mrs. R. P. Schwerin, at their home in 
San Mateo. 

— Another group to enjoy the past few clays on the Monterey 
peninsula at the Hotel del Monte included Mr. and Mrs. Maurice 
Sullivan, Mr. and Mrs. Georges Bowles. Mr. and Mrs. Dean Wit- 
ter, Mr. and Mrs. William Leib, and Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Gal- 
lagher. 



\ WELL SETTLED COMMUNITY 

Nothing denotes the well set lied orstald and reliable com- 
munity so much as that in which the lines are sharply drawn 
as to what really is society and what is not. That kind of de- 
nial -kat Ion may only be achieved in a long time and after men 
and women have assumed their places almost by a God-given 
right. A community in which the lines are well demarked needs 
no local hook of the Peerage or social Register In order to 
demonstrate to the enquiring stranger as to who is who and why. 
The who is who book is the local society periodical, the journal 
which gives Its attention to furnishing the world at large the 
most reliable informal ion as to the movements and the 
of the set which has come to be known as "society." San Fran- 
cisco is thai kind of o community and The News Letter is the 
periodical furnishing the reliable Information as to functions in 
the select realm, 



JANUARY SALE 

cil l \< l.t si\ i: OAH8NEH 

FURS 

25 i to 50 OFF 

These extreme redu, fur and I 

fur garment in stock They make this the waited-for 

sellin- bounding with 

exceptional buying opportunities. All Lb - fur 

trimmed cloth 

Auctions. 

Louis Gassner, Inc. 

112 GEARY >T.. War (.rant Ave. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 6, 1923 





IFINANCIAV 




By P. N. BERINGER 



this is the first one on 
hich we may, with al- 
predict a prosper- 
come. Why? Well, 



IN MANY years 
the entrance of 
most perfect confidence 
ous twelve months to 

because it has been raining dollars for the 
Californians. We are about as sure as any- 
one may ever be of having abundant crops 
of every variety in 1923. And there is not 
anything on which you can bet with greater 
certainty of winning than good to abundant 
crops — 1923 should be a bumper year in 
every direction. 



In a Business Way 

In a business way the state of affairs is 
most promising, too. The year begins with 
good business and with the backing of hav- 
ing had the very best trade during the holi- 
day season in San Francisco that the mer- 
chants have had since 1914. Manufactur- 
ers, wholesalers, jobbers, retailers, are all of 
them happy. They are making plans, with 
the help of the bankers, to handle a big 
business for 1923 and they are going to get 
all they can handle. 



Labor and Capital 

In San Francisco, owing to the practical 
good results obtained by all under the Amer- 
ican plan, labor finds itself remuneratively 
employed and capital is realizing a safe and 
a sane profit on its investment. There is in- 
dustrial peace. We have put, it is hoped, 
the strike away as an obsolete and stupid 
instrument of warfare between employer and 
employe, when there arises a difference of 
opinion as to wages and conditions. Every- 
one realizes the benefit of this peace and 
the most ardent radical in labor's ranks, 
except of course the professional trouble 
breeder, fervently wants a continuance of 
conditions as they now exist and as they 
may be improved upon. 



Bradstreet's Review 

Bradstreet agrees with us that optimism 
and confidence greets the opening of the new 
year. The Review presents many interest- 
ing facts on looking backward. The state- 
ment is made that strikes in 1922 have re- 
tarded things and that they have added to 
the cost of all kinds of operations. It is 
entirely too bad that an economic truth such 
as this one, which is gathered as it has been 
gleaned a hundred times before, from ex- 
perience, may apparently not reach the read- 
ing public in labor's ranks and there made 
the impression it makes elsewhere. Class 
prejudice and a blind opposition to anything 
and everything emanating from what is called 
"the capitalistic ranks" prevents any good 
feing accomplished through such publications 
in anything that may even be suspected of 



being tainted with the so-called capitalism. 
It results that, if any good is to come out 
of the lessons of the past, this must be 
demonstrated to labor through its own pub- 
lications. At least, a great deal more good 
would be accomplished by publication of 
economic findings in labor organs, as far as 
organized labor is concerned, than by pub- 
lication in any other kind of publications. 
\vill the labor organs note that strikes retard 
prosperity and that they make operations 
costly? It is to be doubted. The strike is a 
too handy weapon, it is drastic and bloody, 
and it is most effective in making plain to 
everyone the labor leaders' power. 



On the other hand, we had larger crops and 
better prices. The stock market showed a 
gain for the year. Nineteen twenty-two was 
a record year for failures and for the amount 
of liabilities. The first part of the year 
showed unemployment and the year closed 
with a scarcity of labor. The wholesale and 
the retail trade exceeded that of 1921. Col- 
lections throughout the year were very slow. 
Mail order trade made a surge forward to- 
ward the end of the year. The building trades 
and the automobile business showed a smash- 
ing accomplishment record period for the 
year. Domestic trade and industry showed 
a steady expansion. Those who like the 
study of the subject of economics will have 
a splendid chance in this period to make one 
fact adjust itself to the other. The fact is 
that we are readjusting ourselves and that 
because of this there is a consequent chaos 
in business of all kinds. We can, however, 
look forward to a continuance for 1923 of 
the betterment in business, which began 
about the month of June of the past year. 



Bradstreet's Retrospect 

This review of Bradstreet's shows many 

strange things as having happened in 1922. 

It is the lowest year in export trade in seven. 



The Mess in Turkey 

Conditions in Europe, and distinctly so in 
Turkey, are much disturbed and while a 
great deal of annoyance is expressed by the 
public because nothing seems to be accom- 



Greetings! 1923 

The officials of the Pacific Gas and Eleclric Com- 
pany desire to make the advertising and every 
other phase of P G and E activity of greater help- 
fulness to customers in 1923 than ever before. 
It is the ambition of this company to make even 
its advertising render a real service to customers. 



To all wen 

For you, P G and E advertis- 
ing for 1923 will give facls on 
public utility problems. It will 
also bring to your attention 
basic principles of the use of 
Pacific Service (gas and elec- 
tricity) arFefting your income. 



To all women 

How to get the most in con- 
venience, health and safety 
from the use of Pacific Service 
(gas and eleftricity) for the 
least cost — that is the message 
which P G and E advertising 
is to carry to you this year. 



To all— our sincere wish is that you may have a 
happy and prosperous New Year 

PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 

P. G .- E 

Pacific Service" 

A California company with 35,000 security holders in the state. 



2-123 



January 6. 1923 



AND TAXPAYERS WEEKLY 



15 



plislicd by tlie parleys thai take place, at 
Lausane and elsewhere, there must be, among 
those who do know that a great deal has 
been arrived .it between the contending na- 
tions, a certain amount of reassuring satis- 
faction. 

It has been a winnowing time, a separa- 
tion of chaff from the wheat, and the allies 
have been nearing the point where a sensible 
and strong position may be taken regarding 
Turkey. National self-seeking is of course 
responsible for almost all of the disagreeable 
features of the situation. Turkey it seems is 
playing for all it is worth on the fact that 
it has behind it a great Soviet Russian army 
and that it will not hestitate as to plunging 
into a war in order to reassert its right to 
an absolute control of the Dardanelles, and 
as to Russia a control of the Black Sea as 
an inland Muscovite lake. But Turkey would 
not enthusiastically bring about a war with 
the allies if it did not know that Great Britain 
was not at all afraid of Turkey but fear- 
fully scared as to what the labor party in 
England would do about anything looking 
like furnishing men and arms. 



An Apparent Accord 

Apparently another accord has been 
patched up between France and England and 
this has been brought about by the action 
of the United States in making clear in no 
uncertain terms what it will agree to and 
what it does not want agreed to as regards 
the Bosporus and the Dardanelles. The fact 
is Turkey is in need of a severe drubbing 
and she should have had it and would have 
had it long ago if discord had not reigned 
between England and France as to the Ger- 
man reparations payments. But that is an- 
other story and space will be given the sub- 
ject next week. 

The Unhealed Spots 

The unhealed spots are Turkey, Syria, Ger- 
many, Russia, Ireland and China. And until 
these spots are healed of their ravaging po- 
litico-economic diseases we may not expect 
a general return of prosperity. More than 
half of the earth is still terribly ill. 



To Regulate Fire Insurance 

The League of California Municipalities 
proposes to have introduced in the next legis- 
lature a bill for the purpose of creating a 
law which will regulate the business of lire 
insurance companies in much the same way 
as business corporations are now being reg- 
ulated. W. J. Locke, the secretary of the 
organization, is credited with having made 
the statement, and former State Senatoi \\ 
M. Kehoe has been named chairman of the 
committee to draft the bill. 



A Campaign for New Settlers 

The Southern Pacific Company is launch- 
ing a campaign for the purpose of aiding 
in the settlement of various parts of Cali- 
fornia by using the local press of those sec- 
tions in an advertising sense. This is a move 
in the right direction and if all other agencies 
which might have a bearing on the subject 
would make an effort at this time the trend of 



migration east to west might be turned to 
California as it has never been turned be- 
fore. 

.Asks to Be Relieved 
of Membership 

Mr. Tyson has served over a quarter of 
a century en the laws committee and for 
many years as vice chairman and chair- 
man. Having arranged his business affairs 
so that he will be at liberty to take a lit- 
tle more leisure in the future than in the 
past and believing that a member of the 
laws committee should always be available, 
when duty calls, he has asked that his resig- 
nation from the committee be accepted. 

His associates all appreciate the work done 
by him in the past and wish him every en- 
joyment in the future of the time for leisure 
and travel that he has arranged with his 
companions. 

Additional duties have been placed upon 
Assistant Manager Clifford, who will take 
a more important executive position in the 
office and will be in charge whenever Gen- 
eral Agent Tyson is absent from duty. 



DIVIDEND NOTICES 



Good Business t 

Arthur J. Hill, California manager of the 
State Life Insurance Company of Indiana, 
states that about $45,000 in bonuses will 
be distributed on January 15, 1923, to rep- 
resentatives of the California agency who 
qualified for membership in the company s 
$100,000 and $200,000 clubs this year. The 
year 1922 was the biggest the California 
agency of the State Life has ever had, fin- 
ishing about 25 per cent ahead of 1921. 

Holiday-maker (unpacking) — Didn*t you 
pack my liniment? 

The Wife No; it was labeled "Not to be 
taken!" — London Opinion. 



Members San Francisco Stock Kxcliange 

Mining and i )il Stocks 
Bonds and Imlustiijils 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION BTOOS BBOK1 M 

Sand for Our Market Letter. Just Qui 

n;rt Bull street 
rhone Kearny 1725 San Francisco. Cal 



INVENTIONS COMMERCIALIZED 

or un- 
patented 1 1 

■ 

ADAM FISH KB MFG. CO. 

-•I I .Mil-, Mo 



I Mo\ TBl'ST TOMPANl *» » *\n » k \ \ 
CISCO, Market sin 

nr ending I >■ i ember 
dend has been declared at th. >ir (4) 

i per annum on nil saving d< 
able on and after Tui 
ilds not cal;. 

me rate of . from 

■ 
rill earn interest from Janu- 
ary 1. 

V J BRICKWEDKU ''..shier 



I nl HIBEKNIA >A\ IXGS AND IOW 

'Ol >!■ ri , - oi Liei Market, McAllister and J is 

streets -For the half-year ending December 81 
1 '' ■ a <'i\ ih. ml has been declared at the rate 
1,1 '"■"■ (») per cent per annum on all deposits, 
payable on and alter Tuesday, Januarj -, LU23. 
Dividends not drawn will be added to deposi- 
tors' accounts, become a part thereof, and will 
earn dividends from January 1, Li»23, Deposits 
made on or before January 10, 1928, will earn 
Interest from January 1, VJ'Z'i. 

R, M. Ti >BIN, Secretary. 



THE IKKNCH AMERICAN BANK (Savings 
i 'epartment), 108 Sutter street — For the bait' 
year ending December 31, 1922, a dividend has 
been declared at the rate of tour (4) per cent 
per annum on alt deposits, payable on and after 
January 2, I92tf. Dividends not called for are 
atlded to and bear the same rate of interest as 
the principal from January i, 1923. Deposits 
made on or before January 10, 1923, will earn 
interest from Januarv 1, 1923, 

LEON BOCQUERAZ, President. 



ITALIAN AMERICAN BANK, S. E. corner 
Montgomery and Sacramento streets ; North 
Beach Branch, corner Columbus avenue and 
Broadway — For the half-year ending December 
3 1 . 1922, a dividend has been declared at the 
rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all sav- 
ings deposits, payable on and after Januarj- 2, 
1923 Dividends not called tor will he added to 
the principal and hear the same rate of interest 
from January i. 1923. Deposits made on or be- 
fore January 10, 1923, will earn interest from 
January 1. 1923. 

A. SBARBOR< '- President. 



in Mitoi.iiT SAVINGS HANK, 7S;t Market 
street, near Fourth — For the half-year ending 
December 3 I . L922, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of four (it per cent per an- 
num on savings deposits, payable on and after 
January 2, 1923. Dividends nol called for bear 
interest from January l , 1923. Money deposited 
on or before Januarj- in. 1928, will earn Inter- 
est Cr January I , L923. 

u C. klkvksaiil, Cashier. 



FIRST FEDERAL TKisT COMPANY, Cor- 
ner Posi and Montgomery stre 

For the half-year ending Decembei 81, 1922, 
a dividend has been declared al the rate of 

lour (\) per cent per annum on all savings de- 

payable on and a tier January J. 1923, 

Dividends nol called for are added to deposit 

accounts and earn dividend from January ' 

i January 10, 

n ill earn Interest from Januarv I, 1923 

m !:. CLARK, I 



it\\K OP ITALY, Junction Market, Powell 

,i nd Kddv Stl 

Montgomery street Branch, cor. Montgomery 
and i 'lay sts ; Ma rkel -< taary Branch, Junction 
Market Geary am| Kearny Sts , Mission Branch, 
3246 Mission st near 29th ; Park-Presidio 

i « 'lenient St and !'th A\e . 1 "oik -Van 

Ness Branch, 1641 Polk St; ESureka Valley 

r 17th ami ' 'astro Sts . Sunset 

Mh Ave. and Irving sts ; Colum- 

SOI Columbus Ave . Excelsior 

Mission St and Ocean Ave. 

I he half-year ending I ■ 1922, 

a dividend has been declared at the rate of 

t.oir , i anum on all Savings De- 

and after Janu 

Dividends nol called for are added to and bear 

Interest an the principal from 

Januai 

DEPOSITS MADE T« • AND INCLUDING 
JANUARY 1" 1 :•-'-: WILL EARN INTEREST 

PR) -M I WIAKV 1 1 

p c ha 1. 1 sldent 



THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

.nk) 

■ 



four 
mihI »nc i|imrtrr . I , 

Janu* 
nuary 

l TOt'RXY. Mai _ 



W. W. HEALEY 

Votary Public 
Insurance BroI:?r 

20H CROCKER BUILDING 

•Opposite Palace Hotel 

Plione Kearny 301 San Francisco 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 6, 1923 




PL/EASURE/'S WAND 

"Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




"Minstrel's Delight" at Orpheum 

Eddie Leonard, after an absence of many 
years, is paying the west a visit. Hearty is 
his welcome in San Francisco and loud is 
the acclaim of Orpheum audiences to his 
great popularity. As a black-face comedian, 
Leonard is unsurpassed in dialect and hu- 
mor. Walter Newman and their company 
of players in "Profiteering" have a good 
skit, ably presented. "It Happened in Paris" 
shows Billy Dale and his support to ex- 
cellent advantage. Halden and Russell oc- 
casion much mirth by their clever playlet 
"In the Service Station," which is full of 
fun of the moment. The Quixy Four make 
a good impression, and Frank Whitman does 
some fine fiddling that sets every foot in the 
house a-tapping. Walter C. Kelly's final 
week as "The Virginia Judge" finds him 
as entertaining and as popular as his first 
appearance. Raymond Bone and the Orph- 
eum orchestra supply their important share 
of the bill. 



Columbia 

"The Emperor Jones" is a play of such 
powerful appeal that one finds the critical 
hand somewhat numbed for its task. Such 
terrific emotions play havoc with the senses 
throughout this weird drama that it is al- 
most impossible to get sufficiently far away 
from their effect to calmly make comment 
on the play and the acting. San Francisco 
has seen "The Emperor Jones" on a smaller 
stage and for a long time we shivered from 
it. At the Columbia, played by the original 
company and staged in a marvelous man- 
ner, the production is of course more im- 
pressive. The knowledge possessed by Eu- 
gene O'Neill of the emotional temperament 
of the Negro is given a dramatic presenta- 
tion of the highest order, and Charles Gil- 
pin, who impersonates the Emperor, one 
Brutus Jones, does some acting that is unique 
in stage annals. 



Alcazar 

The play of the week at the popular 
O'Farrell street theater is a cheery piece 
called "Dear Me," affording considerable 
amusement to holiday audiences and con- 
genial roles for Dudley Ayres and Nana 
Bryant. The story of the playwright, the 
violinist and the girl with stage aspirations 
is an entertaining one and well acted by the 
Alcazar company throughout. 



Imperial 

Mary Pickford, the charmer incomparable, 
continues to draw huge audiences to see 
"Tess of the Storm Country," in which she 
has a role after her own heart, showing 
her in her many and lovable moods, and 
once and for all settling firmly the question 
as to those famous curls. Some catty crea- 



ture whispered it about that Mary's curls 
spent the night in her dressing table drawer. 
Oh, is that so? A likely story, indeed, when 
we see with our own very eyes the lovely 
head ducked in a pail of soapy water emerge 
drenched but intact, and dried and every- 
thing right there! 



California 

Elsie Ferguson is an actress of distinction 
and in "The Outcast" she does some of her 
finest acting. The part is peculiarly suited 
to her talents, and the audience is held en- 
thralled throughout the performance. Well 
staged, well acted and certainly well re- 
ceived, this Paramount picture is upholding 
the traditions of the California theater. Ben 
Black s band grows more popular every 
week — his joyous melodies are irresistable. 



Granada 

The success of Thomas Meighan is of that 
order which makes one say always, "This is 
the best thing Meighan has ever done." Cer- 
tainly in the George Ade masterpiece, "Back 
Home and Broke," he has a part made to 
fit him as perfectly as his most devoted ad- 
mirers could desire. The play is better than 
it seemed from all the descriptions we had 
of it in advance; it is light and laughable, 
with just enough purpose to give it body and 
enough philosophy to give it weight. Thanks 
to Mr. Meighan's striking impersonation of 
the hero, Miss Lila Lee's village maiden de 
luxe, and the Granada's fine staging, this 
proved a tremendous success. Paul Ash in 
Vagaries, Wallace the organist, good short 
reels and a really excellent news film make 
the program a memorable one. 



Curran 

The performance of Alfred Hertz and his 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra last 
Monday afternoon at the Curran theater is 
worthy of special mention. Never has any 
orchestra or leader drawn more compli- 
ments from an audience and never has such 
a combination given the people a greater 
pleasure in hearing a rendition of the works 
of the masters of music. The whole pro- 
gram was a masterful interpretation and such 
finished work is very rarely heard except 
after a long tutelage under the baton of a 
great master in the art of direction. Not 
the least of the pleasure to be derived was 
from the abrupt transition from Beethoven 
to Dukas and the Wagnerian overture. 



Next Week's Orpheum 

The comedian Roscoe Ails with Kate Pull- 
man, Charles Calvert and the orchestra 
should be a drawing cards as there is some- 
thing doing for every minute the combina- 
tion holds the audiences at attention. We 
all know Eddie Leonard and he is with us 



again. And Bert Fitzgibbon does his side 
splitting comedy stunt. Grace Menken as- 
sists Wilfred Clarke, who is a nephew of 
the great Edwin Booth. They present an 
irresistibly subtle comedy entitled "Now 
What." Mabel Russell and William Halden 
will bring gales of laughter out of the most 
case hardened listeners. Edward Miller will 
be there with his fine voice and his ex- 
uberant youthfulness. And then the El Ray 
sisters will show the audience just what a 
wonderful poetry of motion skating really 
can be made. 

And Jack Hanely is a comedy juggler and 
apantomimic humorist. 



Alcazar Next Week 

"Daddy's Gone a Huntin'," a really great 
play in which Marjorie Rambeau was starred 
at the Plymouth theater. New York, has been 
chosen by Thomas Wilkes as the next at- 
traction at the Alcazar theater, beginning 
Sunday matinee, January 7. 

It is replete with dramatic incidents and 
unexpected situations and presents the eter- 
nal triangle from a new and different view 
point. 

Zoe Akins, who wrote "Declassee," which 
found such favor with Alcazar audiences, is 
the author of this unusual piece. She is said 
to excell her own previous work in the re- 
markable strength of her characters and her 
picture of a certain phase of American life 
is especially vivid. 

Nana Bryant, whose popularity with local 
audiences is already most pronounced, should 
be found admirably suited to the principal 
role. Dudley Ayres will be cast in a part 
requiring painstaking delineation, but one to 
which he is well fitted. Little Lucille Shirp- 
ser has been cast for an important part. 
She is very popular at the Alcazar and her 
appearance will be welcomed. 

"Daddy's Gone a Huntin' " is a modern 
play, the locale of which is laid in New 
York. There are three distinct scenes and 
the production is being carefully planned by 



SAMfRAMOSCO 



\n NAyot<*u.Vfc 




\ 



ma ™y ES 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 

Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted in Dress Circle 
and Loges 



January 6, 1923 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



17 



.St.it;<' Directoi Hugh Knox and Scenic Di- 
rector Dickson Morgan. 

This week comedy reigns at the Alcazar 
with a holiday production of "Dear Me," 
which is filled with fun and amusing situa- 
tions. 



BRIEFLETS 



The Soviet government has revived exile 
to Siberia as a method of meting out pun- 
ishment. 

In Sandhurst, Bendigo, Australia, it is not 
uncommon to see old prospectors and tramps 
prospecting "for a color" after a heavy rain- 
storm. Geld is found by road menders and 
a barrow load of this storm-sluiced sand has 
been known to yield half an ounce of fine 
gold. 



Work has begun on the first of a chain 
of twenty hotels for motorists, extending 
from Vancouver, B. C, through Washing- 
ton, Oregon, California and Nevada. These 
hotels will be one day's automobile run 
apart and will be constructed on the unit 
plan. They will provide the motorist with 
comfortable quarters and food supplies, auto 
equipment and repair shops. 



A new copper process makes it possible 
to weld together iron and steel parts. The 
copper penetrates into the fine pores of the 
iron and forms a firm weld. 



The United States consumes two-thirds of 
the world's rubber production. 



The first income tax in the United States 
took effect in 1863, when a tax of 3 per 
cent was made on all income of more than 
$600 and 5 per cent on incomes above $10,- 
000. 



II0TELPLA7A 

Jan FRANCISCO 



DINING-ROOM 

Surprisingly good meals 
pleasingly served. Note 
the moderate prices: 

trpnkfiiM '.'.-.<• Ii> 7.',r 
l.tltii'lifitn (I:,,- 
Dinner II. tS 

(A la Carle Service itao) 




Sunbeams 



A clergyman and a doctor of the same 
name resided in the same street. The clergy- 
man died and the doctor eventually went 
abroad. 

On reaching his destination the doctor sent 
a cable to his wife, which by mistake was 
delivered to the widow of the clergyman. 
It ran as follows: 

"Arrived safely. Heat terrific." 



"Come in for your tay," Mrs. Murphy 
called to her husband, who was working in 
the garden. "There's toast and eggs, kip- 
pers and boiled tomatoes." 

"Sure and ye're only kiddin' me," he 
cried, hopefully. 

"No, Terrance," was the reply. " 'Tis only 
the neighbors I'm after kiddin'." 

"And you wouldn't begin a journey on 
Friday?" 
"Not I." 

"I can't understand how you can have 
faith in such a silly superstition." 

"No superstition about it. Saturday's my 
payday." — Pathfinder. 



School Teacher-What little boy can tell 
me where is the home of the swallow) 

Arthur -Please, teacher, I ken. 

Teacher— Well. Arthur? 

Arthur — The home of the swallow is in 
the stummick. 



Mrs. Youngbride— How is it eggs are so 
much higher than they were? 

Grocer — The hens aren't laying so many, 
ma'am. You see there are quite a few holi- 
days at this time of the year. — Boston 
Transcript. 



A teacher of music in a public school 
was trying to impress upon her pupils tin 
meaning of "f" and "ff" in a song they 
were about to learn. 

After explaining the first sign, she said: 
"Now. children, if "f" means forte, what 
does "ff" mean?" 
"Eighty!" shouted one. 

"Don't vou think long hair makes a man 
look awfully intellectual?" 

"It depends. My wife found a long hair 
on my coat sleeve yesterday, and I looked 
a perfect ass. 

Doctor You are suffering from a compli- 
cation of diseases, sir at least six. 

Patient — I suppose you'll allow me a dis- 
ccunt on the half-dozen, doctor? 



"Look here! Do you say I stole the one 
pound note you lost? 

"No. I don't say that." 

"Then what do you say?" 

"Well. I say that if you hadn't helped 
me look for it 1 might have found it." 
Pearson's Weekly (London). 



I line win- ten of us boys," said .Sw.unis 
by. "and each of us had a sister." 

"Great guns! Then there were twenty of 
you altogether?" 

"No — only eleven." 

"Here's where I pull a good one," said 
the dentist as he fixed his tweezers on a 
sound tooth. — Wisconsin Octopus. 



The dean was exceedingly angry. 

"So you confess that this unfortunate 
young man was carried to the pond and 
drenched? Now, what part did you take 
in this disgraceful affair?" 

"The right leg, sir," answered the sopho- 
more meekly. — Johns Hopkins Black and 
Blue Jay. 



Prison Visitor — My friend, have you any 
religious convictions? 

Prisoner — Well, I suppose that's the right 
word. I was sent here for robbing a church. 



He — I suppose your father was an ideal 
father and husband. 

She — Indeed he was. He let his first wife 
divorce him, let his second wife spend all 
his money and then went to the poorhouse 
and so didn't give us children any bother. 

"A" Operator — Has Marjorie an educa- 
tion along musical lines? 

"B" Operator -I should say so! Name 
any record and she can tell you what's on 
the other side. — Telephone Review. 




FIREPROOF*STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1690-1821 M.irkn Srreet 

P»tW— Irwnklin and (•'■ugh 
1>l*phnnr r»rk 171 



Mayerle's 




Expert Optical Service and 

Scientific Eye Examinations 

960 Market Street 

29 Yean in San Francitcts 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 6, 1923 



VISIT 

"The 
Catacombs" 

AT 

CYPRESS LAWN 
CEMETERY 

City Office: 

995 Market St. 

San Francisco 

PHONES: SUTTER 695 

DOUGLAS 4772 
1 


Fred Kahn 

Automotive Engineering in Its 
Entirety 

UNDER ONE ROOF 


General Repairing and Overhauling 

Fender and Ignition 
Radiator "Work Welding 
Body Building Brazing 
Woodwork Blacksmithing 
Machine "Work Klectrical 
1 arhuretion 


Experts in Every Branch 
1507 SUTTER Telephone West 8296 

Authorized Elgin Parts and Service 



The Automobile 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a little better than seems necessary" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold in similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Estabjfthed 1855 

37-45 First Street - - San Francisco 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Hours: 2 till 4, and by Appointment 

Phone Sutter 1718 

REMOVED TO 

Howard BulldlnE, 309 Post Street 

Corner Grant Avenue. San Franci.ro 



Quality 1866— 56 Years— 1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Burlinrame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodslde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Francisco Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 



Fast Driving 

The various fines and the imprisonments 
meted out to offending drivers of machines 
seem to have, to a very marked degree, 
stopped the wild driving of automobile chau- 
feurs and owners. It was and it probably 
still is necessary to adopt these measures in 
order to put a stop to action which the fines 
alone seemed inadequate to suppress. It is 
noted, especially in the cities, that drivers 
are much more careful than they used to 
be in the handling of their machines. There 
is, however, a necessity for something else 
being done by the police in the matter of 
the danger from automobile and truck driv- 
ing that is easily found in the fact that pe- 
destrians do not seem to care at all wherci 
or at what time they cross streets that are 
crowded with vehicles. Unless something is 
done to curb what has been called "jay 
walking" by fining and, if necessary, im- 
prisoning the "jay walker" the accidents due 
to the automobiles and "jay walkers" being 
on our crowded thoroughfares at one and 
the same time will continue. 



Parking Space 

The use of the automobile is increasing 
all of the time and the prices for very good 
passenger motors are coming down all of the 
time, too, so that it is not going to be long 
before any individual possessed of modest 
means may own a machine. That means that 
our streets, the streets of any large city, 
will continue in an increasing extent, to be 
used as parking space for automobiles. Of 
course, it is realized there are times when 
automobiles must be parked at the curb on 
any business or residential street. That is 
unavoidable. There are, however, entirely 
too many "sleepers" all over the city. Block 
after block is utilized and lining the streets. 
on both sides, are hundreds of machines 
which should find a sleeping place elsewhere. 
This is true of the business district in San 
Francisco, and not content with occupying 
one-half of the width of our wide streets, 
the automobile owner is now occupying more 
than half of the width of the narrow ones. 



Women have poorer memories than men, 
but they never forget a compliment. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
t»n""ntlv lncnterl at Post and Powell Sts. 



so - n 

BEN'TRD 
REPAIRED 



TYPEWRITERS 

Guaranteed Factory Rebuilt 

All Makes 

See the New Remington Portable 
The Standard Keyboard Portable 

Paper — Ribbons — Carbon — Supplies 
AMERICAN WRITING MACHINE CO. 

FOfl Market St., San Fran. Phone nous- 64!t 
308 13th St., Onklitn»l Phone Oakland ?;<H 



lucky 



Old man luck is haunting 
you with this reminder to 
drive in and have your 
spring rebound troubles 
cured by a set of STAR 
Rebound Controllers. 
They are instantaneous in 
action, unlimited in effec- 
tiveness,adju5table toyonr 
car and reasonable in 
price. 

Use them and you will 
"thank your lucky stars" 
daily for a new sense of 
comfort. 




Light Cart 

S20 

Med,um Wtithi 

Can SSO 
Hravj Weight 

Curt HO 



£TA "I> REBOUND 
9 J»^mA% CONTROLLER 

J. P. SCHILLER COMPANY 

933 Geary Street 
Pros. 587 San Francisco 




LEE S. DOLSON CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 33c per (lay; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



Open Kvery Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

05 Post Street, Near Market Street 

I'hitll. Kearny I ".:<<; 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
$1.25 

M.'„u Served a la Curl.-. Al.n Regular 
French and Italian Dinner. 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Suits Pressed by If and, Only — 
Suits Called Tor it ml Oellvered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 
433 Mason St. Phone Franklin 2510 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering- the Motoring- public 
an Enameled paint ot guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3410 

WHAT BEST SEKVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings 

Banks ot San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 30th, 1922 

Assets $80,671,392.53 

Deposits 76,921,392.53 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1 ,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,750,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 400,613.61 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement Si. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter 

(4M) P er cent per annum was declared for the six 

months ending December 31st, 1922. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 
Anglo-London-Paris Company 



RECOMMENDS 



i 



Irrigation District Bonds 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgagee l>ecause they rank ahead of 

first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6 3 4% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT HOND 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO. CANADA 
r.id ip capitsi n5.ooo.ooo hj.ooo.ooo ■ < s < n < rs>* 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

48E BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG.: NEW YORK: 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager 



450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

W. J. OOULTHARD, Assistant M 



U~Ar 



i<^* ■■»»«%■■ si *Jlf»'*m»Jl f +»+J\t f +**J\ f ** 




Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 5600 
San Francisco, Calif. 



COMBINED STATEMENT OP CONDITION 

HEAD OFFK'K AND BRANCHES 

BANK 
OF ITALY 

SAA INOS COMMERCIAL TKtST 

HEAD OFFICE, SAN FRANCISCO 

MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



December i<) 7 Itlii 



RESOURCES 



First Mnrtgatfe Loans on Keal KHtfttc..$84,2 , 73,524.83 

Other Loans and Discounts (iH,7 1 5,760.84 $152,98!>,285.67 



United States Bonds S38,68o,544.32 

State, County and Municipal Bonds.... 10,436,847.63 

Other Bonds and Securities 9,368,137.36 

Stock in Federal Reserve Bank 600,000.00 



TOTAL V. S. AM) OTHER SECURITIES.... 

Hue from Federal Reserve Bank $10,210,657.08 

Cash and Hue from Other Banks 19,025,053.35 



TOTAL CASH \M) DUE FROM BANKS 

Banking Premises, Furniture, Fixtures 

and Safe Deposit Vaults. 

Other Real Estate Owned 

Customers' Liability under Letters of 

Credit and Acceptances 

Uncollected Interest 

Employes' Pension Fund (Carried on Books at). 

Other Resources 



TOTAL RESOURCES 



59,090,529 


.31 


2i),235,7Il 


23 


9,517,872.86 
501,673.92 


701,622.45 
1,996,787. 11 

1.1)0 

248,805.97 


$254,282,289 


52 



LIABILITIES 



DEPOSITS ¥289,7ol,5»5.82 

Irrigation District Funds 234,215.05 

Dividends Unpaid 991,528.00 

Discount Collected, hut Not Earned 73,554.02 

Letters of Credit, Acceptances and Time Drafts 701,622.45 



CAPITAL PAID IN 

SURPLUS 

Undivided Profits 

Interest Earned hut Not Collected 



$231,752,445.34 

15,000,000.00 

5,000,000.00 

533,057.07 

1,996,787.11 



TOTAL LIABILITIES ¥254,283,289.52 

All charge-offs, expenses and interest payable to end of half- 
year have been deducted in above statement. 

P. C. Hale and "W. R. Williams, being separately duly sworn 
each for himself, says that P. C. Hale is Vice President and that 
said W. R. Williams is Cashier nf the Bank of Italy, the Corpora- 
tion above mentioned, and that every statement contained herein 
is true to his own knowledge and belief. 

P. C. HALE, 

W. R. WILLIAMS. 



Subscribed and 
her, 1922. 



vorn to before me this 2!tth day of Decem- 
THOMAS S. BURNES, Notary Public. 



The Story of Our Growth 

As Shown l>y i' Comparative statement i>f Our KeKourreH 

December. 1904 $285.436. <)7 

Oecrmher, 19011 S2.574, 004.90 

December, 1912 $11,22S,814.56 

December, 11)1(> 989,805,005.24 

December, 1920 $157,464,685.08 

December, 1921 $194,179,449.80 

December 29, 1922 $254,282,289.52 

NUMBER OF DEPOSITORS, 101,798 

Savings Deposits made In nnd Including; Jannnr.v 11), 1023, 
will enrn Interest from January J, 1933 



First Federal Trust Company 

Affiliated with The First National Bank of San Francisco 

SAVINGS— COMMERCIAL— TRUST 

Post and Montgomery Streets 



Statement of Condition, December 30th, 1922 

RESOURCES 

First Mortgage Loans on Real Estate $11,033,955.92 

Other Loans and Discounts 2,304,820.90 

State, County and Municipal Bonds 1,626,489 H 

Corporation Bonds 2,726,188.74 

Real Estate 8.254.76 

Furniture and Fixtures 50,000.00 

Other Resources 4,894.59 

United States Bonds and Certificates 3,292,514.11 

Cash and Due from Banks 3,177,222.33 

Total $24,224,340.97 

LIABILITIES 

Capital $ 1 ,500,000.00 

Surplus ! 425,000.00 

Undivided Profits 269,909.15 

Deposits 21,969,462.04 

Other Liabilities 14,969.78 

Dividends Unpaid 45,000.00 

Total $24,224,340.97 

OFFICERS 

Rudolph Spreckels Resident 

.1. G. Hooper Vice President and Manager 

R. R. Pardou- vice President and Secretary 

Clinton K. Worden vice President 

O. K. rushing Vice President 

( . H. McCormick Treasurer 

M. R. Clark Cashier 

L. A. McCrystle T ust Officer 

c. B. Hobson Realty Loan Officer 

S. W. Drascovich Assistant Secretary 

G. W. Hall Assistant Secretary 

A. R Curtis Assistant Cashier 

W. H. Cameron Assistant Cashier 

.1. H. Eastman Assistant Trust Officer 



Wyatt H. Allen 
John P. Brooke 
t >. K. Cushlng 
.1. G. Hooper 
Thomas .Jennings 



I>1RK< TOKS 

Clifton H. Kroll 
Walter S. Martin 
R. D. McBlroy 
.1. K. Moffitt 
James D. Phelan 



W. T. Smith 
Howard Spreckels 
Rudolph Spreckels 
Rolla V. Watt 
Clinton E. Worden 



Savings Deposits made on or before January 10th, 1923, 
will earn interest from January 1st, 1923. 




p R .ce, cents JAX pAYERS WE EKLY $S0OPERYEAR 



SAN FRANCISCO 




SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 1923 



LOS ANGELES 




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960 Market Street 




29 Years in San Francisco 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
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1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



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SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



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H. W. Culver M. Daberer E. Johnson 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1866 




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Devoted to tile Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. CII 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF., SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 1923 



No. 2 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building. Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

— Out of the war the Cape to Cai'ro railroad will at last be a 
reality. 

— When will we finally arrive at the conclusion that to be ethical 
one needs to have good sense and to fly from professional snobbery? 

— The American plan has assured us a period of rest from strikes 
and all of the attending losses always incidental on walk-outs for 
all concerned. 

— San Francisco is fast becoming one of the biggest art centers 
of the world. In a few years from now its museums and memorial 
buildings will be the talk of all people. 

— The British will be allowed to run things as they like in Tur- 
key with the exception that all other nations must insist on keep- 
ing the Dardanelles and the Bosporus an open sailing route for ships. 

— San Francisco knows how. It has an old gray horse who has 
mastered ringing in a fire alarm and bringing out the whole de- 
partment. If Los Angeles has anything better to offer let her come 

forward. 

* * * 

— What a grand old milch cow these United States are getting to 
be. Here comes Coue cooing the dollars from the people who are 
willing in every way and on every day that Coue should get away 

with the simoleons. 

* * * 

— Is there any other part of the world where the rain and the 
sunshine is so evenly divided that satisfaction is expressed on all 
sides? It has been raining dollars and the sunshine following the 

rain makes you feel mighty good about it all. 

* * * 

■ — With a bus line running the length of the Embarcadero that 
part of town will become a much more sought after district. The 
bus line will benefit business of all kinds and will be a great benefit 

to those having affairs with the various steamship lines. 

* •* * 

— A story is going the rounds about a red Siberian commander 
who had a soldier shot because that soldier presented proofs to 
him that Lenine was an agent of Germany. The sentence of death 
was based on the fact that "no one has any right to confuse the 
mind of the other when that mind is once made up." What a con- 
venient way of keeping one's countrymen satisfied and quiet, espe- 
cially quiet. 



— Strange as it may seem, the British are so sentimental about 
helping the Arabs they will not allow the Turks to take the Mosul 
oil fields. The question is, what arrangement exists as to the out- 
put of oil and the British companies operating or to operate in the 
Mosul territory? 

— Certainly the eastern part of our beloved country has had its 
share of storms and cold this winter. That, however, should send 
a lot of the inhabitants scurrying to this part of the country, either 
as visitors or as permanent residents. There is room for all who 
may wish to come. 

— The Golden Gate Ferry Company has not injured the ferry 
business of the Northwestern Pacific Railway to any extent but it 
has, on the other hand, increased travel by automobile in Marin 
County by more than 60 per cent. That is the kind of competi- 
tion we should welcome in all lines of business. 
¥ 9 $ 

— Buy and build now is a good cry and it should be emphasized. 
There is a vast amount of building going on on both sides of the 
bay, over in Marin County and down the peninsula, but this should 
be increased to double or treble the quantity and then there would 

not be enough to satisfy the demand. Buy and build now. 

* * * 

— There is an expectant hush all over Europe and people are 
waiting developments as between France and Germany and the 
allied nations and Turkey. The probability is that France will have to 
bring the war to a close, which despite the armistice, has been going 
on constantly ever since, by the occupation of the Ruhr Basin and by 

the administration of government for the Germans. 

* * * 

— The fly in the ointment in the German claims as to being broke 
is found in the fact that the French claim that to state a thing 
without bringing forward proofs is not making a statement true. 
And the French further claim that Great Britain is trying in every 
direction to derive business advantages for herself out of the mis- 
fortunes of every other people on earth. 

* * * 

— Now is the time to finish up with planning and to get ready 

with doing. San Francisco needs and must have outlets down the 

the peninsula, and these highways should be reached by the city 

just as quickly as possible. Every road leading in and out of 

the big metropolis is crowded with traffic and there should be some 

relief provided with all possible speed. 
» * * 

— Invisible governments by clans or societies are justified only 
in the cases of emergency where the regularly constituted legal au- 
thorities have utterly failed in asserting themselves and have failed 
in creating a proper respect and an obedience to the law. But 
government by clans or societies or vigilance committees is only to 
be considered as of comparatively momentary existence and as soon 
as the law asserts itself clan government and the like should be 
given up at once. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 13, 1923 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




It must be apparent to everybody that there 
The Use and Abuse is a vast use of white paper being made in 

this country and in other lands. This is due 
to the great expansion which has taken place in the use of publicity 
by anyone and everyone desiring to reach the public eye and ear. 
And much of this use of white paper is perfectly legitimate and 
has a tendency to improve world conditions through the dissemina- 
tion of useful knowledge. Publicity is used by the manufacturer, 
the merchant, the farmer, the politician and by others too numerous 
to classify, to send forth messages thought to be most important, 
and also at times most profitable not only to the sender but to the 
recipient. The newspapers and periodicals use a great amount of 
white paper and it is said this use of white paper by newspaper 
and periodical publishers is increasing rapidly in volume. Such an 
increase would be only a logical thing as everywhere populations 
are on the increase and, at any rate, the reading of newspapers 
is increasing in communities where hitherto there was no reading 
whatever. 



And there are abuses and these abuses are increasing 
The Abuses quite as rapidly as are the legitimate uses made of 

publicity. Thousands upon thousands of tons of white 
paper are spoiled every day to send useless messages to the people; 
fraudulently inclined people use paper on which to write alluring 
stories to literally steal money out of the pockets of all kinds of 
citizens. And there are many newspapers that might as well never 
be published and some that should be forbidden publication be- 
cause of their evil influence on the people. 



A particular abuse of the privilege of using 
A Particular Abuse white paper is to be found in the use certain 

persons make, at times, of having their mes- 
sages published, paid for and franked in the post office by the 
government. These people take the privilege to themselves of forc- 
ing the people to pay for the sending out through the mails of 
personal puffs, the printing of which is borne by the government. 
A flagrant case has just come to the notice of The News Letter 
and should be pointed out. One Gordon Lee has resigned from 
government employ and taken a position with a private corpora- 
tion where he gets a much larger salary than the government ap- 
parently could afford to pay for his services. Mr. Lee is probably 
all that is claimed for him and an extraordinarily capable man as 
to the knowledge possessed by him in regard to the automotive 
industry and the expansion of the automotive trade but that does 
not warrant the Department of Commerce at Washington broad- 
casting the whole country's press with the page stuff that the gentle- 
man is now out of government employ and is receiving a much bet- 
ter salary and giving the press the views of Mr. Lee on the future 
of the particular industry in which he is so much interested. 



And this particular Mr. Lee and the depart- 
Should Never Be ment referred to are not alone in offending. 

There are many others. This is the point: if 
Mr. Lee wants to send a message to the press of the country as to 
his resignation and his advancement to a better paid post with a 
private corporation, that is his business and he is not to be inter- 
fered with as to the sending out of such publicity, but when he 
makes you and me pay for that service to himself then it is time 
for all of us to protest and to protest energetically against any 



and all abuses of this kind. It is assumed that Mr. Lee could 
pay for the publicity he has obtained free from the government, 
that he could obtain lists of newspapers and private parties, with- 
out having recourse to the official department lists, and that he 
could secure competent mimeograph firms to take care of his print- 
ing and of his mailing. No private individual has any right what- 
soever using your money, my money, and the money of the rest 
of us to print, publish and frank through the mails any story as to 
his resignation from one employment and his taking up of another 
or sending any other story out at government expense for his 
private profit. 



The News Letter once again considers it- 
Embarcadcro Bus Line self endorsed. The embarcadero bus line 

is almost an accomplished fact and if there 
is any loss incurred the Board of State Harbor Commissioners will 
make that up. Engineer O'Shaughnessy says this loss will amount 
to about $100 a month. The people will willingly pay this amount 
and in many directions San Francisco will gain by the operation 
of the bus line. As a matter of fact, it is doubted if ever there 
will be any such loss and some transportation men say the line 
will be operated at a profit from the start. 



President Harding has killed, by veto, an at- 
That Pension Roll tempt to make a raid on the treasury in the 

form of providing for increased pensions. The 
pension has been a most fearful drain and any attempt at increases 
should be viewed with alarm. It is quite evident that, whatever 
faults may be attributed to Mr. Harding and whatever virtues may 
be claimed for him by his friends, there is one thing which he pos- 
sesses and that is BACKBONE. 



That prince of good fellows, Wales, has been 
Prince's Betrothal betrothed to several young and very interesting 

females but in nearly every instance of such a 
report has come an almost instant denial of the story. The most 
recent occurrence of this kind was last week when the news came 
that the prince would marry an Italian princess. The English peo- 
ple would prefer him to declare his belief in democracy by marry- 
ing some American girl. This might well happen. The time is past 
when the foundations of the British Empire had to be cemented 
by the marriage of its princes with the royalty of other lands. 



Evidently President Harding has made a very grave 
Beyond Attack error in not allowing the deputation of women from 

the Mollie Pitcher Club of New York to address 
him on the subject of prohibition enforcement law. There is no 
law which may not be repealed and it is wrongful for any official 
to take the stand that an amendment to the constitution may not 
be amended or changed or that there shall be no discussion on the 
subject. There is no law or amendment in this country which may 
not be subject to attack or change and to take the position that he 
will prevent any attack or any change being made in the prohibi- 
tion law is to place himself squarely in the wrong by the president. 
It is not inferred that the chief magistrate has not the right to have 
an opinion and to express it and to use his power to prevent laws 
being changed. Being president does not take away from the indi- 
vidual American the rights he enjoys as a private citizen and being 
president does not give that individual the right to say there shall 



January 13. 1923 



AND TAXPAYERS WEEKLY 



be no discussion of laws or amendments or of the desire of certain 
parts of the people to change these laws or amendments or to 
prevent such taking place. 



Big Bill Haywood has had to give up the 
Bill Haywood's Fiasco dream of making his soviet industrial 

schemes a success and he now is stranded 
in Moscow, and is pictured as completely broken in spirit and sit- 
ting listlessly waiting for something to turn up. Haywood has made 
the mistake of supposing that anybody could succeed in doing 
things, in a business way, despite the fact that business ability was 
absolutely lacking. And so Utopia and Bill have gone to smash 
together. Which is entirely satisfactory, as long as Russia doesn't 
hit upon some plan for sending Bill back to us. We do not want him 
and there certainly is some place in Sovietism where Big Bill will 
fit. In a Soviet country the theory is that there is a place and an 
occupation for everybody. Sometimes theories do not adjust them- 
selves to fit with facts and that may be the case with Big Bill. 



The condition at Mer Rouge and Bastrop indicate 
Mer Rouge that a state of near anarchy has existed for some 

time in certain parts of Louisiana. It is hoped, now 
that the authorities have started with the effort to assert themselves, 
they will not stop until such time as they have probed the whole 
situation to the very bottom and cleaned up the entire dirty mess. 



Of late years no family has been able to 
The McCormicks Again hold itself in the limelight as constantly 

as the members of the McCormick family. 
The last one to be used as a headliner in the newspapers is the tal- 
ented daughter of Harold McCormick. Apparently this young woman 
possesses the sturdy honesty of the Rockefeller side of the house and 
she refuses to accept money from her father, because he divorced 
her mother, and she refuses to accept money from her mother be- 
cause her mother is accepting the attentions of a young Swiss, 
many years her junior. Miss Muriel is to be congratulated and it 
is hoped she will be successful in earning her own living without 
the help of people whom she does NOT approve. It is the first 
time, in a very long while, that anyone has had any occasion to 
compliment a McCormick. 



The fight over the possession of the rooms of 
That Irish Consulate the Irish consulate in New York is a disgrace. 

Either Ireland is entitled to a consulate or 
she is not and if she is her legal representatives should be protected 
in her rights. The so-called Irish Republicans are people in revolu- 
tion against their lawful government and they should be restrained. 



It is being more and more evident that the so-called 
De Valera Irish Republic is deader than ever. And the apostle of 

misrule and riot, De Valera. is a fugitive and is appar- 
ently receiving help to evade those who would catch him and bring 
him to a trial by the officers of the Irish Free State. If the Irish 
Republic is dead in Ireland it is not, by any means, dead in this 
country, and in all parts of the country meetings are held and 
money is collected for the purpose of carrying on "the war" in Ire- 
land. This war has never in reality been a war but has been a 
bush whacking and shooting from behind stone walls and hedges; 
a bombing of men without giving them a chance for defense. It 
has been a case of Irishmen killing Irishmen. On the side of the 
Free Staters has been order and authority conferred upon them by 
a majority of the people and on the side of the so-called Republi- 
cans has been disorder, rioting and tortures. The Free State gov- 
ernment has been very slow in arriving at the conclusion that drastic 
measures are necessary but at last trial by court martial has been 
instituted as to all who may be caught with firearms in their pos- 



session and there have occurred <|uile a numbei ol llicsc. Among 
those thus executed have been some notable men. Since the adop- 
tion of these stern measures the Republicans have been much less 
active and now there is talk of parleys for peace. It is hoped that 
peace may be had for Ireland but it is also hoped that De Valera 
may not escape the punishment he deserves for all of his crimes 
against his country and his badly misled and unfortunate followers. 



J. B. Brady, the general manager of the Pa- 
Some Great Changes cific Coast division. United States Rubber 

Company, has been elected the president of 
the Industrial Association of San Francisco. O. R. Johnson, the 
vice president of the Union Lumber Company, was elected first 
vice president, while R. H. Ivory, who is personal manager for the 
Standard Oil Company, was chosen second vice president. B. R. 
Funsten got the position of third vice president, Walter Haas, of 
Levi, Strauss & Co., fourth vice president; H. B. Allen, of Allen & 
Co., was chosen secretary, and the Hotel St. Francis was made 
treasurer. There seldom has been such a strong directorate and 
official list elected to any body in San Francisco. 



S. Waldo Coleman, the president of 
Mr. P. E. Bowles Buys Stock the Security Bank and Trust Com- 
pany, has announced that he has sold 
his stock to P. E. Bowles, chairman of the board of directors of 
the American National Bank. This is an apparent confirmation of 
the current report that the American National Bank will eventually 
absorb the stock of the Security Bank and Trust Company. 



In the struggle which has been going on be- 
Mr. Spreckels Loses tween stockholders and others in the Crocker 

National and the First National banks the 
strength of the stockholders' vote at the annual election of directors 
retired Mr. Spreckels. This action has revived the talk of the con- 
templated merger of the Crocker and the First National interests. 
There was. however, no mention made at this meeting of the pro- 
posed merger nor of the interior chain of banks. 



All of the coast companies report an 
Insurance Business Improves improving business in insurance. The 

California State Life has written busi- 
ness approximating $14,000,000 in 1922. and the company reports 
that practically all of this was obtained from California. Texas and 
Oaklahoma; the New World Life of Spokane is another of the coast 
companies reporting an increase of business, a gain of over $300,000 
for 1922; the Pacific Mutual Life, always a most energetic com- 
pany and always after new business, estimates its new business for 
the year at over $82,000,000, and the West Coast Life shows an 
increase of 50 per cent, while the Western States Life reports the 
best year in its existence. All of the agencies for insurance com- 
panies report favorably as to the business done in life insurance 
during 1922. and the result warrants anyone in calling it a banner 
year. 



The Sweetness 
of Low Prices 



Never Equals 



The Bitterness 
of Poor Quality 



We combine Quality, Price and Service 

JOHNSON BROS., Grocers 

Fillmore St. at Sacramento— At Yonr Command Phone Ueil 240 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 13. 1923 




OWING to the peculiar lay-out of San Francisco the bulk of 
travel is sent along Market street, as its one great artery. 
Lately all of the other streets in the center of the city show signs 
of vehicular and pedestrian congestion and this congestion must 
be relieved This relief should come as a suggestion from the 
property owner. 

Civic congestion may be expressed by an excessive population 
or it may be shown through the inability of caring for the 
traffic of such a population, both as pedestrians and as of those 
who use vehicular means of getting about as passengers or with 
freight. The city of San Francisco has not as yet such a large 
population that it has its various districts of congested popula- 
tion and owing to its geographical layout it is not likely there ever 
will be any very great popular congestion such as does now exist 
in cities like Chicago or New York. 

But San Francisco certainly does suffer through congestion of 
its streets at various hours as to the pedestrian and as to the driver 
of automobiles, wagons and street cars. Market street, the great 
business artery, is getting so much of the travel of the city in every 
way that there are but few hours of the day when that long and 
exceptionally wide thoroughfare is not too crowded for comfort. 
In the early morning hours, when people are coming into the city 
from across the bay to their work and in the evening when they 
are returning, at noon when they are going or coming from lunch- 
eon, and during the middle or shopping hours of the day, in the 
heart of the city, the sidewalks are so crowded with people as to 
make travel distressingly slow and this is a most irritating thing to 
the man of business. Furthermore, to travel by automobile from 
places within a short distance of one another to other nearby places 
is almost impracticable, and to travel by automobile any distance 
on Market street, Montgomery street, Kearny street. Grant avenue, 
Powell street and many other streets in the shopping district is ir- 
ritatingly slow and is beset with many dangers for the driver and 
for the pedestrian. 

The people of San Francisco once had the opportunity to create 
a system of radiating streets that would have eliminated for all 
time the congestion which must continually grow on such streets 
as Market. After the fire, when to create new streets would have 
been comparatively an easy matter and property owners could have 
been depended upon not to make too strenuous objection, the pro- 
ject was entertained and a great architect did make suggestions and 
drew maps to show how the changes could best be made. But that 
project never became more than a hullabaloo discussion and died 
soon after it was born. It is a strange fact this project was not 
more seriously entertained at that time and it is especially odd 
because everyone has realized for many years that something would 
eventually have to be done to relieve Market street congestion in 
time to come. 

That time is now upon us and we are not trying seriously to 
meet the situation. In order to clarify the situation as much as 
possible the suggestion is made that the people demand action by 
the Down Town Association and that this association, after a thor- 
ough investigation, make known its findings and its suggestions, if 
any, to the board of supervisors for action and relief. The News 
Letter has already repeatedly made the suggestion that certain streets 
at certain hours be made one-way streets. This ruling could apply 
to Market street, Kearny and Montgomery, Powell street and Grant 
avenue, and a few blocks on Geary street. At certain hours of 
the day all truck traffic should be shunted to Mission street from 



Market and if Mission street is thus unduly crowded, then this 
heavy through traffic could be sent for all of the distance that 
would be deemed practicable along Howard street. Much of the 
automobile traffic could be cut off of Market for certain hours, 
and sent to Mission and Howard streets. Action of this character 
would enhance property values on Mission and Howard and would 
in no way detract from the value of Market street property. 

Another suggestion is made to relieve the situation as far as 
Market street is concerned and that is to build sidewalks at the 
height of the second-story windows and leave the street itself to 
the heavy traffic and freight usage. Another idea is to place all 
street car lines underground on all the main thoroughfares down 
town. Yet another and a most valuable suggestion, and one which 
would not cost the city any money at all to bring into use, is to 
ban all carriage of freight from the daylight hours and to make these 
deliveries by night. This suggestion is made in view of the fact 
that millions upon millions of dollars are invested in buildings and 
plants in the congested districts and that the enterprises in which 
these millions are invested stand absolutely idle for from eight to 
ten hours of the day of work. Night work is just as pleasant and 
just as easily accomplished as day work and there is no reason why 
truck and freight men should not as willingly work at night as in 
day time. 

Now is the time for a discussion of the various ideas presented 
as a solution of the difficulty which is becoming each day a more 
vexing problem for the city to face and any kind of idea the prop- 
erty owner may advance which seems practical should be gratefully 
received by the people of San Francisco. 



HAS PASSED AWAY 

Edward J. Linforth, the well known business man, passed away 
last week at the age of sixty-three, and leaves behind a circle of 
mourning friends and acquaintances. The sympathies of the public 
will go to his widow, Miriam Brooke Linforth, and to his children. 
Mr. Linforth was a native of England. 



— San Francisco is the city of constructive optimists and that 
is one of the most potent of all the reasons why in a time of world 
readjustments she has forged to the front with a record of phe- 
nomenal business done in 1922. Nineteen twenty-three will pass the 
record of the preceding year. We are face to face with the near 
approach of a phenomenal prosperity. Welcome. 



JANUARY SALE 

OP EXCLUSIVE GASSNEK 



FURS 



25% to 50% 



OFF 



These extreme reductions apply to every fur and every 
fur garment in stock. They make this the waited-fo'r 
selling event of the year — an occasion abounding with 
exceptional buying opportunities. All this season's fur 
trimmed cloth coats are included at proportionate re- 
ductions. 

Louis Gassner, Inc. 

112 GEARY ST., Near Grant Ave. 



January 13. 1923 



AND TAXPAYERS WEEKLY 




mm 



IXlollK'JmldrUAxir 
'Q*<Ulinlt/jbft6edm/*ir.vilhrcn 



— The defense of those charged with murder at Herrin seems to 
be of the kind which makes a counter charge which, however, has 
little or nothing to do with the accusations placed against the men. 
This kind of a defense smacks a good deal of past procedure in 
the police and other courts of San Francisco whenever a union 
thug or gunman was accused of crime. The trouble here was that 
such a defense was usually quite successful and the accused got 
away with a mild reprimand. Those days are gone forever, we hope. 

— The San Francisco Congress of Mothers Clubs and the Parent 
Teachers Association, as the result of a questionaire, are credited 
with having voiced a denunciation of the methods of the daily yel- 
low press. 'Tis a move in the right direction and such a condem- 
nation may do a little good but it would be a more effective way 
to discipline the aforesaid yellow press if the members of the two 
associations would combine in eradicating the copies of the yellow 
press from their own homes. It is a safe bet that most of those 
attending just devour the Sunday Yellows. 

— The three automobile bandits who were arrested while giving 
two young ladies a ride in a stolen vehicle should be given the 
limit. From the number plates and keys found and other para- 
phernalia discovered it seems these gentlemen of the road were in 
the business of stealing machines as a life occupation. Part of 
whatever life remains to them should be spent behind prison bars. 

— It seems we are to have two new bridges of the toll variety. 
One of these will be built by San Mateo citizens and the other 
by a ferry company, over Carquinez Straits. The companies back 
of the building of the bridges are composed of earnest men, who 
have stepped in to do something which should be done by the 
public enterprise. However, any way to get a bridge or a road is 
a good way and we want both roads and bridges. 

* * » 

— His name made a mouthful, you just try it on your neighbor. 
He was called Jesus Sejerensantoun. It was not on this account 
the Malay was denied citizenship but for legal reasons which apply 
to the yellow races. The gentleman with the long name had given 
honorable service to his Uncle Samuel. He had served in the navy 

since 1905. 

* * * 

— So, Lenine is ill again and he has been deprived the pleasure 
of presenting a long report explaining the present day condition 
of Russia and its return to the fold of the capitalist. Well, maybe 
that is better than having to digest all that Lenine may have to 
say on the subject. It will certainly take a very large book to ex- 
plain away the failures of sovietism, in every direction. 

* * * 

— Quite evidently John Bull is out for all he can make and his 
position as to the reparation money due France is on a par with 
all his other actions in all parts of the world. It is too bad that 
this should be so but with John it is business which apparently 
counts and wherever a business advantage for the future is to be 

reaped then every agreement must go to the scrap heap. 

* * * 

— It is most gratifying to read of the very sensible suggestions 
made by Monsieur Coue and to know that he positively objects 
to be called "doctor." 



MRS. HARDING'S NEW YEAR'S PRESENT 

One of the sweetest New Year remembrances received this year 
by "the first lady of the land" came from Mrs. Julius Kahn, wife 
of Congressman Kahn of San Francisco, who is chairman of the 
military affairs committee of the House of Representatives. It was 
a gaily decorated basket of California almond confections filling six 
tiny lacquered bowls served on a beautiful lacquered tray of black, 
red and gold design. 

The gift was sent to Congressman and Mrs. Kahn by Manager 
T. C. Tucker, of the California Almond Growers Exchange. Mrs. 
Kahn wrote Mr. Tucker: 

"I feel sure you will be pleased if I tell you it looked so beautiful 
and seemed so typically Californian, that I sent it as a New Year's 
greeting to Mrs. Harding." 



WELLINGTON GREGG 

Wellington Gregg was well known by the business world of San 
Francisco and in the social world he had many friends, who will 
bemoan his early death. He was a figure in the financial world and, 
as an associate in the management of the Crocker banking inter- 
ests, had shown a remarkable capacity and his usefulness will be 
very hard to replace by any other man. He was familiar with every 
phase of banking and he was thoroughly acquainted with every 
detail of all of the great Crocker enterprises. Mr. Gregg was born 
on the Pacific Coast and he started in the banking business as a 
messenger boy. He made his way by dint of his great ability. He 
leaves a widow, a mother, Mrs. Wellington Gregg Sr., two daughters, 
Mrs. Stuart Haldron and Mrs. Daulton Mann; two brothers, Harry 
and William Gregg, and a sister, Mrs. Leon F. Asten. Mr. Gregg 
was a member in almost every notable club in San Francisco. 



— The threat is given out over at the university that the women 
students will pay their way from now on. 



I 



Do your plans for 1923 include 
provision for the PROTECTION of 

your FAMILY, in the event of your death? 
If SO, lit me show you how to secure the 
HKST and SAFEST protection for the 
LOWEST NET COST. 



ARTHUR J. HILL 

California Manager 

State Life Insurance Company of Indiana 

1028 Market St., San Francisco 



I 1 

Fill in and mail this blank to Mr. I 
Hill. No obligation entailed. i 

I Name | 

Address - < 

I 
Age nearest birthday 






SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 13, 1923 



I ♦ I 



IHHliaHBBHHBIgllHgBBBiBH^ 



he Woman in the Case 



BY CHANDLER MASON 



» 



THE argument is being advanced, as it often has been advanced 
in similar cases, where men have been guilty of having acted 
brutally, cr minally and outrageously toward women, that in the 
case where a woman thus outrageously and criminally treated was 
what is called "bad" an excuse exists for the behavior of the male 
brute in the case. 

That kind of an apology is now being made, where it is asked 
that a male, charged with having so brutally and criminally as- 
saulted a young woman that she died of the effects of such an at- 
tack, the girl was "bad and must have known what to expect." 
On this plea many men, and some women, are arguing that the 
male in question be allowed to "come back." That to this man 
be extended the hand of friendship and encouragement and that 
he be taken to our hearts again as a fun maker extraordinary, espe- 
cially because in the days of yore the children loved him. And 
because of his ability to make himself ludicrous in the eyes of 
the children and women, he should be allowed to do some 
more. That is what is meant by "coming back." But that side of 
the story has been exploited and it has now become largely a bat- 
tle between the women of the country, the decent element among 
the men, and that part of the communities constituting this great 
big republic, who hold that if the girl in the case was harmed and 
subsequently died, because "knowing what she was to expect" en- 
tered the room with the male and eventually died from the effects 
of the mistreatment, it is alleged she received, in that room, the 
male was not so much to blame! And the further statement is 
made that because it is alleged, and not proven, the girl in the case 
was "bad" it really does not make much difference what happened 
to her. 

And this cross-eyed-warped-brained psychology is applied to the 
case by men who should know better and whom one would expect 
would try to uphold the decency of the country when it demands 
that the offender in this case be not allowed to parade himself 
once again before the little children, the women, and the men in 
his fun-making attempts. The fact that the woman was bad, if so 
she was, the fact that it might have happened that the woman came 
from the lowest purlieus of a low-down brothel, cannot be used 
as an apology for anything happening which sent her to her death. 
That she was bad is alleged, but has never been proven. Suppos- 
ing that it had been proven, what then? Has not the lowest of 
the low, among men and women, the right to ask the protection of 
the law and, in the case of a professional harlot, of the worst 
kind, who is brutally treated and who dies of the after effects of 
such treatment is not society right in demanding the punishment 
of those who may have been guilty of so fiendishly treating this 
woman that she died? And should not society demand the punish- 
ment of those who may have been guilty, with a greater vehemence, 
in the case of an abandoned prostitute than in that of a sheltered 
and protected female? At least, there should be no difference made 
at all. 

And, if the accused has had two or three trials, and it is finally 
found, despite the nature of the testimony advanced, that no con- 
viction is possible should not the world at large take the testimony 
presented and weigh it for or against the accused? The question 
is really whether enough was presented to make it perfectly plain 



that the "come back," as planned, through the medium of the pic- 
tures, is to be frowned upon by the people and this return should 
be made impossible. The apology for what happened to the woman, 
that she may have been a "bad" one, is no apology at all and it 
really makes a very bad case worse in the eyes of all who may 
allow themselves to view this case without prejudice and singly 
with an eye to the welfare of the youth and the womanhood and 
the manhood of the nation. 



BRIEFLETS 

Coal prescriptions, signed by physicians, are deluging Chicago 
coal dealers. These prescriptions urge that certain consumers, be- 
cause of illness or other emergencies, be preferred in coal distri- 
bution. In the belief that each instance must be one that demands 
special consideration the dealers are complying with the demand 
and furnishing the coal on prescription. 



Germany is now a country of extremes. There are those who 
nearly starve and there are others living in luxury. The German 
government has now decreed that high taxes shall be paid by all 
who partake of the revelries in the Berlin restaurants. The revenues 
proceeding from this tax will be turned over to the committee for 
the feeding of the needy. 




The Mother Goose 
Confections 

Here is Something ^ISlew! 

A confection made of California's most 
perfect fruits and berries, scientifically pro- 
cessed, chocolate-coated or "candied" in 
their own juices. 

The natural sugar of the fruits produces a 
PERFECT Candy. 

I >ipped in chocolate perpetuates the nat- 
ural exquisite flavor and fragrance. 

ioo Varieties, 5c to $1.50 Each 

One pound box by mail postpaid. $1.00. 

Send a box to your eastern friends. 

Visit our Art Gallery of Mother Goose 
paintings by Chas. A. Holland, the world's 
lamed artist. 

^Mother Cjoose Confection Co., Inc. 

1214 Market St., San Francisco 



»..K K H:g [»:* ft "H.x M J! n'x. :ft ft S >: ft ft ft ft ft ft SMMM«I« ft ft ft ft a ft. 5 



January 13, 1923 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



Twelve Yemz Old 



BY BASIL THRUMP 



THE story is being published that at an examination by an effi- 
ciency expert of the officials of an Ohio city — Cleveland I think 
it was — the whole administrative force was found to be woefully 
deficient in ordinary qualifications to be called intellectual. In fact, 
that part of the force in which is supposed to dwell the most cun- 
ning and intellectuality, the detective department, was found to av- 
erage up to about the intelligence of an ordinary twelve-year-old 
child. 

That kind of a test gives you food for thought and if you will 
look about you and weigh your neighbors and attempt to come to 
some conclusion as to their actions and reactions you will be forced 
to come to the realization that this particular detective department 
was not so very badly equipped after all. 

When the field of morals is invaded and you attempt to arrive 
at whether those about you are immoral, moral or unmoral, you 
must arrive at some of the most astonishing results. One question 
which throws a light on the unmoral condition of many of those 
you know will be found by asking the question as to where they 
stand as to the payments due the United States because of the 
loans made during the war. You will be surprised to find the large 
number of people who hold to the opinion that, as the foreigners 
were required to spend the borrowed money in this country, we are 
therefore not really entitled to a return of the money. These poor 
misguided unmoral individuals argue that while we loaned the money 
it came right back to us in payment for purchases made here. They 
either forget or want to forget that money is but a symbol and 
that while it is true the money was spent here the substance went 
to Europe and Asia and Africa in the form of manufactured goods 
made in this country and that those borrowing the money got the 
benefit out of the goods and there is no reason whatever why they 
should not pay back the loans they contracted to pay for these 
goods. 

There is, however, like the poor, always with us, a very large 
number of people who are undeveloped and unmoral. Every little 
while is brought to the bar of justice some poor unfortunate of 
this character for sentence for some offense committed against the 
welfare of the whole country. One case in point is very interesting, 
and is found in a young leader of a gang of toughs, who was a 
"perfect lady" at home and a vulgar female beast when working 
at her trade of holdup artist. This girl had a lover whom she calls 
her "sheik," and whose probable arrest she deplores. This girl will 
most probably be proven guilty of every crime made against her. 
Indeed, she seems so thoroughly deficient of all idea of whal 1- 
right and wrong that she could very easily be convicted out of the 
boasts she has made since placed under arrest. One other thing 
she has demonstrated beyond the shadow of a doubt and that is 
she is so thoroughly unmoral that she is in point of fact abso- 
lutely irresponsible. She will, however, be punished for her sins 
and she will, it is presumed, never know exactly why she was pun- 
ished and the judge and jury punishing her will know very little 
more about her and the reason for her criminal tendencies than 
she will herself know. Should such a woman go free of punish- 
ment? Certainly not. The argument is that she should be given 
a mosl thorough examination ami il it is possible i.> remedy the 
defects in her makeup an effort in that direction should be made, 
but that kind of an effort may not be made in a penal institution. 



AIDING EVERY UNITED STATES INDUSTRY 

The middle west merchant marine committee has issued a very 
capably written pamphlet to prove that the ship subsidy, which is 
being tinkered with in Congress, will aid every United States in- 
dustry. To the extent of the help extended this is perfectly true, 
but the question arising in the minds of many who have followed 
the deliberations and who have studied facts presented by those 
in favor and in opposition is whether the merchant marine of the 
country is in such a deplorable condition as it is represented to be. 
It is true that the steamship company officials have for a long time 
advertised all who would only listen to them that the particular 
line operated by the official who was holding forth had not paid 
and did not pay. 

Specifically it has been stated that the operation of lines to Japan 
and the Far East generally did not pay and that if the government 
withdrew its help these lines would, many of them, have to stop 
operations entirely. 

Those who are in opposition in Congress are not so much so be- 
cause they belong to the so-called "farm bloc" as that they seem 
to have been convinced of two things. The first of these is that 
the subsidy is an unnecessary thing and amounts practically to a 
gift or bonus drawn out of the United States treasury and paid 
over to the ship operating companies. 

The second reason given is that the shipping companies have 
been making and are still making a great deal of money, although 
it must be admitted that at least one lean year has intervened be- 
tween their big profit taking sessions. 

On the floor of the House of Representatives certain figures have 
been presented causing one to think it is not at all necessary to 
belong to a farm bloc, or any other bloc, in order to appreciate 
just how much money the steamship companies have been accu- 
mulating in the past and how much they must be accumulating, 
now that business is picking up. And. because of the figures pre- 
sented, it would seem, to some of us, that all is needed is careful man- 
agement in order to keep the wolf these ship owners have been 
howling about so vociferously from the door. 

Here are the figures: 

The American Hawaiian paid dividends of 200 per cent in 1916; 
the same company paid 405 per cent in 1917; the Luckenbach 
S. S. Company made a net profit on its capital of 236 per cent in 
1916; 606 per cent for 1917. The Pacific Mail Steamship Com- 
pany made 365 per cent net profit on its capital stock, 1915-20; 
during 1921, which was the very worst in the history of shipping, 
the Atlantic. Gulf and West Indies Co. made net profits greater 
than its capital in 1915-20. In 1921 made a net income of $1,781,- 
337, after deducting all expenses, taxes, interest, and losses on sale 
of Liberty bonds. The United Fruit Company, with a capital stock 
of $50,000,000. made net profits of $94,147,500 in 1915-20, paid 
dividends of $77,080,277, and increased their surplus to $66,176,- 
490; the Dollar Steamship Lines made net profits on capital stock 
of 322 per cent in 1916 and 104 per cent in 1917. 

To offset this account of profit taking the companies will be able, 
no doubt, to show either a lessening of profit for the years following 
those mentioned and, in some instances, may be able to show losses, 
but taking the losses in consideration it would seem advisable to 
go slow in granting a subsidy to meet deficiencies which may not 
exist at all. As a matter of fact there are those in Washington 
who speak of the subsidy as a drive on the sheckels of your Uncle 
Samuel and. it must be noted, too. that many who are willing to 
do all they possibly can to assure the prosperity of the merchant 
marine are not ready to endorse prosperity making through the 
subsidy way and these point out that at no time in all history has 
it been possible lot any nation to luccewfully establish a merchant 
marine, or any other great national industry, through the means 
of a subsidy. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 13, 1923 



THE AMERICAN PLAN 

To make San Francisco an American plan city has cost those 
behind the movement the sum of $1,200,000, and this money was 
subscribed by the business men of San Francisco. The next largest 
membership body in San Francisco is the Chamber of Commerce 
and the membership which is behind the American plan exceeds 
that of the Chamber of Commerce by three thousand. There are 
over 10,000 members now enrolled. Max Kuhl made the above 
figures public last week at a banquet of the Master Painters Asso- 
ciation. In the course of a very able and comprehensive talk Mr. 
Kuhl gave the facts as to the organization to his hearers and he 
gave to "Billv" George, of the Builders' Exchange, all of the credit 
for whatever success had been attained. 

It was in May, 1921, the committee called together the brains 
of the business community in a mass meeting at the Merchant s 
Exchange. 

Here $160,000 was subscribed in half an hour. Ninety-eight 
per cent of this money was actually paid in at the time. The last 
call was sent out eighteen months after that auspicious beginning 
and already 90 per cent or more has been paid in. This is especially 
flattering, as it would seem that, logically, interest would be waning. 
This goes to prove instead that not one business man has lost in- 
terest. 

The public may not understand, and probably will find it diffi- 
cult to understand, that the issue never was the amount of wages 
paid or demanded. The issue really was upon the rules and regula- 
tions, telling you that you could not employ a man unless he bore 
the union's label. And that is why the community spirit in San 
Francisco rebelled. The power of giving or withholding employ- 
ment is more potent than the power of government. The American 
plan has made it possible for any self-respecting man to earn his 
living and the daily bread for his family. There has not been a job 
or a jurisdictional strike in San Francisco for over a year. And 
the American plan has helped San Francisco in many other ways 
and notably in that of business increase for 1922. Men who know 
the open shop prevails here are said to be arriving at the rate of 
a thousand a month. After about two months of experience in a 
free city the average of these men sends for his family. And there 
has been very satisfactory results all around, where the contractor 
has handled the situation sympathetically. There is no feeling against 
the union. Those outside and those in the union work right along- 
side of one another. Those who have made the American plan 
possible in San Francisco are in that movement simply to make 
it possible for a man or woman to exercise the right to earn a living. 



AN ANNIVERSARY 

December 28, 1922, marked the tenth anniversary of San Fran- 
cisco's municipally owned street car system. During its ten years 
of existence it has grown from its modest beginning of ten miles 
of trackage, ten cars and seventy-five employes, to a system which 
is reaching many portions of the city and today valued at $10,- 
000,000. 

The San Francisco municipal railway has been a success since 
its inception and is a matter of great civic pride to the citizens of 
this city. Although it has been an object of attack by many who 
oppose the entire idea of municipal ownership, it has been a finan- 
cial success and has never cost the taxpayers a penny either for 
maintenance or upkeep, and has retired more than a million dol- 
lars of the original $5,000,000 bonded debt. It has done this on 
80 per cent of its revenues, as 20 per cent of its gross receipts 
are laid away each year as a depreciation fund and a fund against 
tortious claims and taxes. The operation of the municipal railway 
has been free from politics. It has been run as a strictly business 
proposition by and for the people of San Francisco. The fare has 



been maintained at 5 cents, which is an exception among many of 
the large cities of the United States. 

The successful operation and management of the municipal rail- 
way is a great argument in favor of the unification of the street 
car lines in this city under city ownership and control, and is the 
only logical solution for our present street car difficulties and in- 
adequate transportation facilities. 

Under the present plan, which is before the supervisor's com- 
mittee and which is hoped will be presented to the voters for rati- 
fication at an early date, the city may purchase the properties of 
the Market Street Railway Company, taking over this paying con- 
cern to be paid for in small amounts at long intervals covering a 
period of years; these amounts to be paid for out of the earnings 
of the company, and the entire purchase price not to be charged 
against the city's debt limit. 

There is nothing in a city's life that can take the place of good 
transportation facilities, and it is obvious that the city cannot grow 
and expand until we have better and more extensive street car 
transportation. 



DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDALS 

Brigadier General Thornwell Mullaly, Major James H. Burns, of 
the ordnance department; Major Clair W. Baird, of the coast ar- 
tillery, on Monday were presented with distinguished service medals 
by Major General Ligget, retired, at the Presidio, where the entire 
command was drawn up in honor of the ceremony of bestowal. 



— Premier Mussolini is finding his office rather a burden and his 
ability to cope with foreign affairs is being questioned. However, 
the gentleman is a dictator and anything is possible under a dic- 
tator. If such a man is clever he may be able to command success 
in any line. 



Announcing 
A MUCH NEEDED ARTICLE 

THE STANDARD 

"HOT BLAST" 

OIL BURNER 

Not merely a perfected substitute for coal — it is a 
vast improvement on coal 

It does the work of coal in a better and cheaper way, 
produces greater heat and eliminates all labor. It is a 
scientific gravity feed oil burner that burns light crude 
oil, fuel oil. distillate, kerosene or old automobile crank 
case oil. Is quiet, clean and healthful, Are and explosive 
proof. Does not smoke, soot, carbon or cause odors. Is 
the only wickless oil-vapor burner that can be turned 
up or down like city gas. Starts and stops at will, no 
priming required and is semi-automatic in its action. 
Comes absolutely complete ready for instant installation 
without any alterations in any coal stove, furnace 
or boiler and is built in different sizes for every 
requirement from the smallest coal stove to the heating 
plant of a 14-room house. Priced from $18.50 up. 
A limited number will be delivered on their own merits 
on our special 3 day trial offer. 

Full information cheerfully sent upon request. 
Representation wanted everywhere, a unique plan for 
go-getters. 

General Oil Burner Company 

Dept. B, YORK, PA. 



January 13, 1923 



AND TAXPAYERS WEEKLY 



II 



Have You Heard It ?{ 

— Thomas Bugle, a prominent corporation lawyer, of Tampa, 
Fla., who occasionally imbibes quite freely, was at the time of this 
story recuperating at an out of the way inn in a small Swiss vil- 
lage. He occupied the choice room on the first floor and was at that 
time the only guest there. The late Mrs. Hyde Ranger, known on 
both hemispheres socially, who also knew this inn, thought it a 
good place to stop after a busy social season in Paris, appeared 
suddenly at the inn, to the delight of the innkeeper, who said she 
could have the whole first floor, with the exception of the room 
occupied by Thomas Bugle. After going over the rooms, Mrs. Hyde 
Ranger decided she must have Mr. Bugle's room for her niece, 
and assured the innkeeper that she would fix it by writing Mr. Bugle. 

Mr. Bugle received the following note: 

"Mrs. Hyde Ranger, of New York, presents her compliments to 
Mr. Thomas Bugle, of Tampa, Fla., and requests that he kindly 
give up his room on the first floor and move up to the second, as 
she would like very much to have the room he now occupies for her 
niece so her whole party could be on the one floor." 

In answer Mrs. Hyde Ranger received the following: 

"Mr. Thomas Bugle, of Tampa, Fla., presents his compliments to 
Mrs. Hyde Ranger, of New York, and desires to know if her niece 
drinks." 

Mrs. Hyde Ranger became very indignant but as she had started 
this correspondence she decided to carry it out so she dispatched 
immediately the following answer: 

"Mrs. Hyde Ranger, of New York, again presents her compli- 
ments to Mr. Thomas Bugle, of Tampa, Fla., and desires most 
emphatically to state that her niece does not drink." 

And in due time she received this final ultimatum : 

"Mr. Thomas Bugle, of Tampa, Fla., again presents his compli- 
ments to Mrs. Hyde Ranger, of New York, and desires to state that 
as her niece does not drink it is easier for her to get up to the second 
floor than Mr. Thomas Bugle, who does drink." 

— An Englishman, an Irishman and a Scotchman were sitting in 
a tavern. The Englishman and the Irishman had both paid for sev- 
eral rounds of ale, but the Scotchman had not made the slightest 
movement toward his pocket. 

The conversation turned toward racing and thence to the sub- 
ject of close finishes. 

"The closest race that I ever saw," said the Englishman, "was 
a horse race in which one of the horses, when leaving the paddock, 
was stung on the muzzle by a bee. He won the race by the length 
of the bump which raised from the sting." 

"The closest race I ever saw," contributed the Scotchman, "was 
a yacht race in which one of the yachts had been freshly painted. 
It won the race by the width of that coat of paint." 

They both turned expectantly to the Irishman. 

"The closest race I ever saw," said he, "are the Scotch." 



— Remarking that parents have abonded the habit of giving their 
infants strings of Christian names, the author of "Recollections and 
Reflections" writes: 

"A parson in Somersetshire was christening a child in his "village. 
He could not gather whether the child's name was Anna or Hanna. 
so stooping down he asked the mother, 'How do you spell it? 

"In an embarrassed and confidential whisper, she replied, '^X ell, 
I ain't no schollard neither, sir'." 



— An artist sat down in a field, far from the beaten track, and 
began to paint a small cottage. 

A countryman strolled up and asked him what he was doing. 
The artist explained. Whereupon the countryman went away, en- 
tered the cottage, and returned with his wife. 

"So, ye're painting my cottage?" he repeated. 

"Yes," said the artist. 

"Well, I've got my witness. Ye're doin' this at your own expense." 



— If there was one thing more than another that Brown hated 
it was to be "caught." As a consequence he was very suspicious of 
any deed or word the meaning of which he could not immediately 
understand. 

Once when he visited a menagerie he had an interesting chat 
with one of the keepers, and as he was about to leave the man 
asked, "By the way, sir, have you seen our black-faced antelope?" 

"Ah," thought Brown, "he's trying to make a fool out of me. 
No." he replied, stiffly. "May I ask with whom your black-face aunt 
eloped?" 



— Pussyfoot Johnson is here and says that New Zealand and 
Australia are booked to go prohibition-ward very shortly. Pussy- 
foot is a good campaigner and he knows that if you claim the 
whole cake you may get a slice. 



Mardi Gras 
at New Orleans 

Feb. 8th to 13th 

Feb. 8: (Crewe of Momus, Tableaux 
and Ball. 

^-■^^ Feb. 10: "The Assembly" Carnival 

CQJrtl^ Ball. 

Feb. 12: Krewe of Proteus, Street 
Parade, Tableaux and Ball. 

Feb. 13: Mardi Gras — Public masking 
on streets all day — Rex Street Pa- 
rade — Tableaux and Ball presided 
over by the King and Queen of 
Carnival. 

\ irn-ila> Mop over at Wen Orleans is allowed mi all 
tickets via the 

Sunset Route 

throimli \»\\ < Meant 
SUNSET LIMITED LEAVES SAN FRANCISCO 

(Thinl-Stro.1 Station) l>ail> at •"■:<«» p. 111. 
and nrrlvea \ru Orleans "::*.■» p. m. third day 

Our agents will ulatlly yivr rod detailed information. 

Southern Pacific 

50 Post St Ferry Station Third St. Station 

or Phone Sorter 4000 




12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 13, 1923 




ocioi: 




BUSY CUPID 

BOARDMAN-VAN WYCK — The marriage of Miss Mary Board- 
man, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Chauncey Board- 
man, and Mr. Oze Van Wyck. son of Mr. and Mrs. Oze Broyel 
Van Wvck of Anderson. S. C., was solemnized Tuesday, the 
Rev. Dr. Charles Gardner of Stanford University officiating. 
One hundred guests, including relatives, were bidden to the 
function. The bride was attended as matron of honor by 
Mrs. Ernest Gunther. the former Miss Helen St. Goar, and as 
maid of honor by Miss Helen Lynch of Paso Robles. Miss 
Kate Boardman, a cousin, and Miss Marie Louise Meyer were 
bridesmaids. Mr. Van Wyck was attended by Mr. Lacare 
Marks. Mr. Van Wyck is a graduate of the University of 
Georgia. The happy couple will make their home in Los 
Angeles. 
RILEY-MANSET — The marriage of Miss Genette Riley and 
M. Oeorges Manset will be solemnized January 24 in Nice 
at the Church of St. Pierre d'Anenes. Members of the Ameri- 
can colony on the Riviera will attend. The future bride is 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robinson Riley of Nice, for- 
mer San Franciscans, and is a niece of Mrs. Osgood Hooker 
and Mrs. C. K. Mclntosch of this city. 
HORN-FELL — The marriage of Mrs. Ella May Horn and Lieu- 
tenant Colonel Fell was an event of January 4. It was sol- 
emnized at Trinity Church, Rev. Charles E. Deuel officiating, 
and the only witnesses to the marriage were Mr. and Mrs. 
John Boyd, the former of whom has been a close friend of 
the bridegroom for many years. Mrs. Fell is the daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Wellington Gardner of Los Angeles. Lieu- 
tenant Colonel and Mrs. James Pemberton Fell will come 
to San Francisco for a brief visit on the conclusion of their 
honeymoon in Santa Barbara. Their arrival at Samarkand, 
Saturday, was the first that was known of their marriage. 
RIPLEY-SHERMAN — An engagement of much social interest in 
San Francisco and in the bride's northern home that has just 
been announced is that of Miss Cornelia Emerson Ripley, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Ripley of Tacoma, 
Wash., and Mr. Frederick Barreda Sherman of this city. Miss 
Ripley is now in Europe with her parents and the exact date 
of the wedding has not yet been decided on, but it prob- 
ably will take place within a few months. Mr. Sherman is 
the son of the late Dr. Harry Sherman. His mother was a 
member of the Barreda family, one of the distinguished Span- 
ish families that settled in San Francisco in the early days. 
Mr. Sherman is a nephew of Mrs. Willis Polk, and Miss Rosa 
Barreda. His sisters are Miss Lucia Sherman and Miss Isabel 
Sherman. 

LUNCHEON'S 
DAVIS — Mrs. Francis H. Davis will be a luncheon hostess Jan- 
uary 25, when she will entertain at the Town and Country 
Club. 
FEIGENBAUM — Mrs. Louis Feigenbaum and Mrs. Morris Frank 
were joint hostesses at a luncheon at the Hotel Richelieu 
and entertained a party of twenty-five friends. The Tally-ho 
room was utilized for the occasion. 
ST. FRANCIS — The delightful Monday luncheon parties brought 
ever so many charming women and members of the debutante 
set to the Hotel St. Francis for luncheon in the Garden and 
Fable room. On Monday Miss Leonora Armsby, considered 
the prettiest of the season's debutantes, wore a frock of dark 
blue that was very becoming to her petite blonde beauty. She 
was with Miss Jean Howard. Miss Josephine Drown and 
Miss Frances Ames were together. Miss Drown was wearing 
a small hat of jade green that matched her coloring per- 
fectly. Mrs. Eugene Murphy and her daughter, Miss Ger- 
trude Murphy, were with a few friends. 
TEAS 
KEESLING — Miss Jacqueline Keesling will give a tea at the 
Francis V. Keesling home on Presidio Terrace on the thir- 
teenth. 
KING — Mrs. Homer King held an informal reception at her 
home "ii Broadway lasi Friday afternoon in honor o£ Mrs, 
John P. Jones. Mrs. Jones, who lias been considered one of 
the favorites in both New York and Washington society, 
has come to California from her home in New York to pass 
the winter as a guest of her sister, Mrs. George J. Bucknail. 



ANDERSON — Mrs. Edilberto Anderson has issued cards for a 
tea to be given this Saturday at the Palace Hotel in honor 
of Miss Frances Moore of Chicago, fiancee of Leslie Taylor, 
brother of the hostess. Mrs. George Merritt Moore will ar- 
rive from Chicago to be here for the Moore-Taylor wedding, 
which is to be in January. 

JENNINGS — Rev. and Mrs. Webster Wardell Jennings enter- 
tained at tea on Saturday afternoon at their home in Pacific 
avenue, when the guests included the members of St. Luke's 
parish and their other friends. The rectory was charmingly 
decorated. Mrs. Louis F. Monteagle and Mrs. James Potter 
Langhorne presided at the tea table. 

WHEELER — Miss Pauline and Miss Catherine Wheeler enter- 
tained at a tea Wednesday afternoon at their home in Broad- 
way. Mrs. Cornells Winkler, the former Miss Dorothea Coon, 
who is visiting with her husband and son at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Irving Coon, was the guest of honor. 

OERSTLE — In honor of Mrs. Edgar Peixotto, Mrs. Mark L. 
Gerstle entertained at an informal tea recently at her home 
in Washington street. Mrs. Peixotto and her daughter. Miss 
Nina Peixotto, will leave for New York and Europe Febru- 
ary 1 and will be away for about six months. They will take 
the Mediterranean trip. 

DINNERS 

DRUM — Mr. and Mrs. John S. Drum will entertain at a din- 
ner at their home in Burlingame on the evening of January 
20, and later with their guests will attend the subscription 
dance at the Burlingame Club. 

SUTTON — Mr. and Mrs. John G. Sutton have postponed the din- 
ner dance which they were to have given Saturday of this 
week in honor of Miss Adrianne Sharp, until Saturday, Feb- 
ruary ?.. The change was occasioned owing to Miss Sharp's 
illness, which is preventing her attendance at social func- 
tions for the present. As was originally intended the dinner 
dance will take place in the San Francisco Golf and Country 
Club at Ingleside and will be one of the brilliant events of 
the winter. 

MAXWELL — Mr. and Mrs. Victor Maxwell chaperoned a party 
of young people at a dinner given on Saturday evening at 
the Woman's Athletic Club. The little group afterward at- 
tended the Club Royal. 

PARROTT — Mr. and Mrs. William Gregory Parrott were hosts 
at a dinner given Friday evening before the benefit cabaret 
at the Burlingame Country Club, which also was in honor 
of Miss Hopkins and Mr. Pond. 

DE LATOUR — Miss Helene de Latour gave a dinner Monday 
evening at her home in Scott street in honor of Miss Frances 
Lent and Mr. Hugh Porter, who were married Wednesday. 

McCREERY — Mr. and Mrs. Richard McCreery were hosts at a 
recent dinner dance party at the Hotel Ritz in Paris, where 
they passed the midwinter holidays. The evening was in 
honor of Field Marshal Lord French of Ypres. Also in tin' 
party was Lady Lister-Kaye, who was here visiting the Mc- 
Creerys two years ago. 

DANCES 

PRESTON — In honor of her granddaughters, Miss Josephine 
Drown and Miss Frances Ames, Mrs. Edgar F. Preston en- 
tertained at a supper dance Friday evening at the San Fran- 
cisco Golf and Country Club. The guests included the other 
debutantes of the winter, as well as a little coterie of the 
other younger contingent in San Francisco society, among 
whom were a number of young married people. The guests 
were seated at fourteen tables. 




Under the guidance of R. II. Collins and his as- 
sociates, the Peerless was bound to l>e a better 
and better Peerless. The public response came 
quickly and is indicated by augmented sales in old 
Peerless strongholds and throughout the country 
in general. 

Pioneer Motor Company 

OP SAN FRANCISCO 

1900 Van Ness Ave., Corner Washington St. 
Telephone Prospect 8800 



January 13, 1923 



AND TAXPAYERS WEEKLY 



13 



CAMERON — Mr. and Mrs. George Cameron and Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Oliver are planning a baby costume party for the night 
of January 27. The fancy dress affair will take place at the 
home of Mr. M. H. de Young in California, street and will 
be attended by a large company. Many amusing frocks are 
being arranged for that evening's entertainment. 
BRIDGE 

DEAMER — A bridge party was given by Miss Helen Deamer for 
Miss Marjory Lovegrove, fiancee of Dohrmann Pischel at her 
home in Berkeley Thursday. 

IN TOWN AND OUT 

CHESEBROUGH — Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Chesebrough and their 
children. Master Jimmy and Master Robert Chesebrough, 
have postponed returning to their home in Newhall and will 
he in San Francisco for the remainder of the month. While 
here the Chesebroughs are the house guests of Mr. Chese- 
brough's father, Mr. William Mayo Newhall, with whom Mr. 
and Mrs. Fentress Hill and their children are also spending 
the winter. 

McNEAR — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick McNeav left for New York 
Wednesday, en route for Paris. They will visit the latter's 
son, Jack Breeden, who is a student at the University of Sor- 
bonne. 

WALLACE — Mr. and Mrs. Bradley Wallace are being cordially 
welcomed on their return from Europe, where they have been 
for several months and where they had a delightful time. They 
arrived home Tuesday and are at their apartments in Web- 
ster street. 

REID — Mrs. Whitelaw Reid arrived this week from New York 
on her annual visit to California. She is accompanied by her 
brother, Mr. Ogden Mills. 

GASSNER — Mr. and Mrs. Louis Gassner sailed on Thursday for 
the Orient and expect to be absent three months. 

McALLISTER — Mr. and Mrs. Hall McAllister will leave the end 
of this month for Mexico City, where they will visit their 
son, Mr. Otis McAllister, a professor at the university in 
Mexico City. 

WALKER — Mr. and Mrs. Willis Walker returned last Friday 
From Pebble Beach, where they had been since before Christ- 
mas. They will be at their apartment in Powell street for 
two or three weeks. 

DONOHOE — Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Donohoe have returned from 
Menlo Park, where they spent the week end at their country 
home. The Donohoes had as their house guests Mrs. Robert 
Kelly and Mr. and Mrs. Wynne van Schaick, who left this 
week for the south, after a ten days' visit in San Francisco. 

JUDGE — Mrs. J. Frank Judge, who has been here on a visit. 
has returned to her home near Salt Lake City. 

Kl'THERFORD — Mr. and Mrs. Alexander II. Rutherford are in 
New York at the Ambassador Hotel. 
INTIMATIONS 

GIBSON — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Gibson are being congratulated 
on the birth of a son, which occurred several days ago. and 
is the second child in the family. Mrs. Gibson, prior to her 
marriage, was Miss Ruth Pollock. 

OTIS — Mrs. Warren Smith I Fredricka Otisl and her small daugh- 
ter, who have been spending the winter with the former's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Otis, at their homo in Broadway, 
will return to her home in Venezuela toward the end of this 
month. 

MAY — Mrs. Margaret May has issued invitations to a musical 
which will he held in the Borgia room of the Hotel St. Francis 
on Saturday afternoon, .lanuai ] 

BLAIR — Mrs. Murray lnnes. Mrs. A. Mct'allutn. Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry P. Mortenson. Mr. and Mrs. George Maxfleld and Miss 
Jennie Blair were among the passengers who sailed on the 
Adriatic for Mediterranean ports last Saturday. Miss Blair 
and her cousin. Mrs. McCallum, will he abroad for most of 
the year. 



AT DEI MONTI'. 

The Pacific Coasl r<>l>> Vssoclatton has notified the Del Monte 

team that it is scheduled to start the California junior polo 
season at San Mateo with games on Friday and Sunday. January 
111 and 11, The following week end. January :* to !! 
Monte will play Midwiek in Pasadena Kadi club on the circuit 
i,, to I'll- week end matches on the fields of other clubs, culmi- 
nating in one big tournament, which will he for the champion- 
ship of the Pacific ("oast 

The first Pacific Coast polo championship has been awarded 
to Pel Monte and the dates of March L 1 :'. to April 1 ."> Ion 
set. There will he three «'"'ks of steady play. This tournament 
will attract the entrj of at least tin teams. There will he con- 
tinuous play throughout the three weeks 



Del Monte's big four will he made up of Harry Hunt, Dick 
Schwerin, Hugh Drury and Eric Pedley. On the junior team 
Willie Crocker will replace Hugh Drury. 

San Mateo has available Willie Tevis, Tom Driscoll, Cyril 
Tobin, George Moore and others and there is a. possibility that 
Elmer Boeseke may also play with San Mateo this season. 



WORTH 

When you think of a man, you seldom think 

Of the knowledge he has of books. 
You seldom think of the clothes he wears, 

His habits, or faults, or looks. 
You seldom think of the car he drives, 

Nor the bonds his gold has bought. 
When you think of a man, you mostly think 

Of some kindness he has wrought. 
You judge him not by his blocks of stocks, 

Nor his power of name or pen: 
You judge a man by the place he's made, 

By the way he has faced the strife, 
And not the amount of the bank account 

He's managed to get in life. 
You think of the friend he's been to man. 

The good that he has done, 
And you judge the sort of a man he is 

By the friends that he has won. 

— By Orrin A. DeMass. 



— It is just fifty years since America's national park policy was 
inaugurated. Half a century ago Congress voted that an im- 
mense tract of land in Wyoming, since called Yellowstone Park, 
should be dedicated as a "public pleasure ground and a game 
preserve." 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 

Van Nprs Ave., at Geary Street SAN FRANCISCO 

Is the most refined family hotel In the city 

— a home unsurpassed 

ELMER M. WOODBURY Manager 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Mnke Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 6180 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



Classy Apartments 
For Sale, $36,000 

Rents $5,280 per annum 



(^ APARTMENTS of 4 rooms each, 
^ hardwood floors, steam heat, wall 
beds; inviting lobby; building in fine 
condition, near Bush and Jones. 



Only $11,000 Cash 

required for these down town 
apartments 

ADDRESS 382 RUSS BUILDING 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 13, 1923 





LFjNANCIAU 




By P. N. BERINGER 



QUITE naturally all the world of busi- 
ness now hangs on what is going to 
transpire as between France and Ger- 
many and Great Britain and Turkey. The sub- 
stance of opinion, among bankers and busi- 
ness men, is to the effect France has agreed 
to let Great Britain have her own way in 
Turkey and that Great Britain has made a 
similar agreement as to the conditions be- 
tween France and Germany. France seems 
determined to move but slowly up to the 
time when she finds it necessary to strike 
and then to move on the Ruhr with every 
ounce of her military strength behind her, 
in case she meets with anything like an 
open opposition on the part of the Germans. 
The business world will continue waiting to 
see the results of the French and the British 
move. In some quarters it is held that Ger- 
many will suffer an immediate and a total 
collapse, and that view is held by some of 
the more astute of the British statesmen, 
but that is not at all the way the French 
look at it. Time alone will tell which of the 
two allies is gifted with a correct apprecia- 
tion of the German situation. As far as 
Turkey is concerned she seems to have a 
war with Greece again impending, as that 
country seems to want to grab Thrace, and 
with a war with Great Britain, as that coun- 
try insists, with the backing of all of the 
allies, that the Straits be kept open to all 
merchant and war ships of all nations as a 
free waterway. In addition the Mosul oil 
lands loom a great issue and the British 
claim these oil lands belong to the Arabs 
and that Great Britain will defend these in 
their right of possession. In the face of all 
of these disquieting conditions, and despite 
them, it may be said that Europe is grad- 
ually re-establishing its financial equilibrium. 
Great Britain has come out with a very defi- 
nite semi-official statement that she will pay 
her war debts without further quibble when 
due. France will, most probably, very cheer- 
fully do the same thing, if Germany can be 
made to pay up promptly. 



Germany's Ability to Pay 

Germany's ability to pay up has been 
doubted by many but this conclusion has 
found lodgment in the public mind only be- 
cause of the great publicity campaign which 
has been sedulously kept up by the Germans. 
Certain countries would like to lend Ger- 
many a sympathetic aid in getting out of as 
much of her payments as possible, on ac- 
count of trade advantages which might ac- 
crue to the nationals of nations thus aiding 
Germany. This charge is being made con- 
stantly against Great Britain. It is doubtful 
if such a charge could be proven a fact and 



it is furthermore doubtful whether Bonar Law 
believes otherwise than he has expressed 
himself as being convinced as to the Ger- 
mans and their ability to pay up. At the 
last moment Uncle Sam seems somewhat dis- 
posed to attempt to stop the proceedings on 
the part of France before these become so 
serious as to be irrevocable. The American 
policy of holding off until some advantage 
may be gained is no policy at all worthy of 
a great nation, while it may be successful 
in making the agony between France and 
Germany last much longer than it would 
under the infliction of the drastic methods 
proposed by the French. 



No Stabilization 
and No Security 

There will be no stabilization of foreign 
currencies and no solid basis for trade or 
confidence until the Germans begin to show 
some responsibility and some desire to make 
good on the reparations now due and to 
become due in the future. The ability of 
Germany to pay must be based on the ability 
of her people to produce, the willingness of 
the German to work. Germany has not 
shown in any way that her people are un- 
willing to work. All she has shown is a very 
clever imitation of total and absolute bank- 
ruptcy. Nothing is calculated more quickly 
to show this to be either true or false than 
the energetic measures to be taken by the 
French war office. 



Mr. Bedford's Conclusions 

A. C. Bedford, the president of the Stand- 
ard Oil Company of New York has written 
thirty-eight very interesting pages on the 
"Problems Confronting the Petroleum Indus- 
try." Mr. Bedford is one of the construc- 
tive captains of industry of the United States 
and he is gifted with a far-seeing eye and 
his delineation of the problems he is writing 
about involve, as he truly says, problems 
confronting every day business in this coun- 
try. He adds that the settlement of these 
problems must have a far-reaching influence 
on the future of America's commercial prog- 
ress. This conclusion of Mr. Bedford's is a 
true one and his small pamphlet is of such 
interest that it deserves a rather lengthy re- 
view, which will be given to it by the News 
Letter in a succeeding issue. 



Against Botulism 

That the business of insurance, from every 
standpoint, is conducted on the most up-to- 
date lines is an admitted fact. Every event 
that in itself shows the possible need for in- 
surance is made use of, as witness the many 
and varied classes of risk that cover can 



now be obtained for. Another instance of 
the watchfulness of the companies for im- 
proving the shining hour is shown in con- 
nection with the case of alleged food pois- 
oning at a Scottish hotel. Proprietors of 
hotels and similar institutions have, because 
of this unfortunate affair, applied for in- 
surance against risks of this nature, con- 
sequently a brisk demand has been set up 
for indemnity policies against similar mis- 
fortunes, and, what is more, underwriters 
have met the demand. The insurance scheme, 
under which protection is given to food man- 
ufacturers, chemists, and grocers to cover 
mishaps has been adapted to meet the needs 
of the present case. Thus, hotel proprietors 
can now for a small premium secure protec- 
tion against the possible occurrence of bot- 
ulism. 



Tonopah Output 

The Tonopah mines output for the year 

1922 was in excess of seven and one-half 
million dollars. The outlook for the year 

1923 is exceedingly bright and individual 
miners predict this to be one of the greatest 
years in mining history in Nevada. The big- 
gest month of the year was that of De- 
cember. 



Tonopah Divide 

The Tonopah Divide is sending its usual 
tonnage to the mill right along. The usual 
satisfactory results are being obtained from 
the milled ore. 



—During 1922 the Y. M. C. A. employ- 
ment department found jobs for 2560 men 
and received 3082 calls for men and boys 
from employers. In the same period George 
H. DeKay, head of the department, and his 
aides held 29,485 vocational and employ- 
ment interviews with men. The Y. M. C. A. 
employment bureau functions without charge 
to association members and to employers. 



A Kind Favor 

Patient — Great Scott, doctor! What an 
awful bill for only one week's treatment! 

Doctor — My dear fellow, if you knew what 
an interesting case yours was, and how 
strongly I was tempted to let it go to a 
post mortem, you wouldn't grumble at a bill 
three times as big as this! — Syracuse Post- 
Standard. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter. Just Out 

370 BuhIi Street 

Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco, Cal. 



January 13, 1923 



AND TAXPAYERS WEEKLY 



15 



Sunfe 



"You look awfully tired, young man," 
said the benevolent looking woman to the 
young man with the books under his arm. 

"Yes, ma'am, I'm studying for a doctor," 
replied the student. 

"It's a shame! Why don't you let the 
doctor study for himself?" 

Dr. Borem took Miss Gushing in to din- 
ner. 

"So you write poems, doctor?" she said. 

"A little — a little; just to kill time," he 
replied. 



"Why?" asked the lady. "Have you 



no 



patients? 



Wifie — And knowing my sentiments on the 
subject, did that odious Mr. Binks insult 
you by offering you a drink? 

Hubby — That's what Mr. Binks did. 

Wifie< — And how did you resent it? 

Hubby — I swallowed the insult! 



"No," replied Grace, "I ain't going." 
"My dear," said her uncle, "you must not 
say, 'I ain't going.' You must say 'I am 
not going'." And he proceeded to give her 
a little lesson in grammar: "You are not 
going. He is not going. We are not going. 
They are not going. Now can you say all 
that?" 

"Course I can," responded Grace, cheerily. 
"There ain't nobody going." 



Hotel Clerk— With or without bath, 
madam? 

The Boy — Get it without, mother. This 
is a pleasure trip. 



"Most men know that nothing can make 
dress goods go up quicker than a mouse. 
— Chula (Kan.) News. 



Simpkins — Oh, I say, you must come home 
with me and see my twins. 

Tompkins — Certainly I will. What are you 
going to call them? 

Simpkins — Peter and Repeater. 

Tompkins — That's good! But supposing 
they had been girls? 

Simpkins — Then I should have called them 
Kate and Duplicate. 



Dean — Why is it that girls like to become 
engaged to several men at once? 

Lean — You know when you have only one 
match it always goes out. — Houston Post. 

The elderly housekeeper asked a young 
maid to run an errand for her, remarking: 
"Your legs are younger than mine." 

The maid, grumbling, replied: "That's all 
very well, but they've got to last longer." 



A Scotsman saw a sixpence lying in the 
road. Disregarding the traffic, he rushed 
forth to secure it. He was run over and 
killed. 

The jury brought in a verdict of "Death 
from natural causes!" 



SMILE A LITTLE 

Smile a little, smile a little. 

As you go along; 
Not alone when life is pleasant, 

But when things go wrong. 
Care delights to see you frowning. 

Loves to hear you sigh; 
Turn a smiling face upon her, 

Quick the dame will fly. 

Smile a little, smile a little, 

All along the road; 
Every life may have its burdens, 

Every heart its load. 
Why sit down in gloom and darkness. 

With your grief to sup? 
Should you drink Fate's bitter tonic, 

Smile across the cup! 

Smile upon the troubled pilgrims 

Whom you pass and meet; 
Frowns are thorns and smiles are blossoms 

Oft, for weary feet. 
Do not make the way seem harder 

By a sullen face; 
Smile a little, smile a little, 

Brighten up the place. 

Smile upon your undone labor; 

Not for one who grieves 
O'er his task, waits wealth or glory; 

He who smiles achieves. 
Though you meet with loss and sorrow 

In the coming years, 
Smile a little, smile a little, 
Even through your tears. 

Smile a little, smile a little. 

All along the way; 
Not alone when skies are sunny, 

But when clouds hang gray. 
Smile a little, smile a little, 

Choose the better part ; 
Keep the home-life always bright with 

Sunshine ir» the heart. 



University professors of Princeton may re- 
tire hereafter on half-pay when they reach 
the age of fifty-five years. Professors can 
continue to teach, if they wish to do so, 
until they are sixty-eight years of age. but 
after that they are to retire automatically. 

A new gas has been developed for aerial 
navigation. It is called currenium and costs 
$100 a thousand cubic feet less than it costs 
to produce helium. It is non-inflammable 
and non-explosive and has a lift about the 
same as pure hydrogen. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

(Tin* San Francisco Bank i 
$26 t \ihf,.M - tranches) - 



F..r the halt 

dlvidero r, " d "' ,he ra,e nf ' oor 

anil onr <in«rt<r «!'■ per cent per annum on 
all deposits, payable on and after January ?nd. 
ed for are added to the 
irn dividend from Janu- 
r before Jan- 
uary 10th, l*.'-3, will earn interest from January 
1st.' ; 

GEO. TOCRJJT, Manager. 



"I beg your pardon, sir, but what is your 
name?" the teller politely asked the man 
presenting a check. 

"Name," echoed the indignant customer, 
"don't you see my signature on the check?" 

"I do," answered the teller. "That's what 
aroused my curiosity." — Hibernia Rabbit. 

DIVIDEND NOTICES 



TH1<; HlIflDKMV SAVINGS AND LOAN 
SOCIETY, corner Market, McAllister and Jones 
streets — For the half-year ending December 31, 
1922, a dividend has been declared at the rate 
of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, 
payable on and after Tuesday, January 2, 1923. 
I >ividends not drawn will be added to deposi- 
tors' accounts, become a part thereof, and will 
earn dividends from January 1, 11.23. Deposits 
made on or before January 10, 1923, will earn 
interest from January 1, l!>2;;. 

It. M. TOBIN. Secretary- 



THE FRENCH AMERICAN RANK (Savings 
Department), 108 Suiter street — For the half 
year ending Decembei 31, 1922. a dividend has 
been declared at the rate of four (4) per cent 
per annum on all deposits, payable on and after 
January 2. 1923. Dividends not called for are 
added to and bear the same rate of interest as 
the principal from January 1. 1923. Deposits 
made on or before January 10, 1923, will earn 
interest from January 1, 192H. 

EE<>.\ BOCQUERAZ, President. 



ITALIAN AMERICAN RANK, S. E, corner 
Montgomery and Sacramento si reets ; North 
Beach Branch, corner Coluuihus avenue and 
Broadway— For the half-year ending December 
31. 1922. a dividend has been declared at the 
rate of four <i> per cent per annum on all sav- 
ings deposits, payable on and after January 2, 
1923. Dividends nut called for will he added tu 

the principal and bear the same rat.' nf interest 

from January 1, 1923. Deposits made on or he- 

January 10, 1928, will earn Interest from 

January 1, 1928. 

A. SBARBi 'K« ., President 



III MHOI.HT SAVINGS RANK, 788 -Market 

street, near Fourth — For the half-year ending 
December 31, 1922, b dh Idend hai bj en de- 
clared at the rate of four <4) I"' cent per an- 
on savings deposits, payable on and after 
January 2, 1 ot < a lied foi 

Interest from January I, 1923. Money deposited 
on or before January 10, 1928, will earn mter- 
POm January 1. L9 

H. •', KI.KVKSA1IL. I 



first FKDBRAL TKOT COMPANY, Cor- 
al and Montgomery m ; ■ ■ 
For the half-year end 1922, 

a dividend has been the rate of 

four i4> per cent per annum Oil all savings de- 
payablfl On and after January 2, 192.1. 
Dividends not called for are added to deposit 
accounts and earn dividend from JanUJU 

iade on or before January 10, 
1988, will earn Interest from January I, I 

M R. CLARK, Cashier 



RANK OF IT ll.Y, Junction Market. Powell 
and Eddv Si 

Montgomery Streel Bi 
and Clay Sts. ; Markel ich. Junction 

Branch. 
Mission SI Itta: Park-Presidio 

Branch, Clement Polk-Van 

N'esa Branch, 1541 Polk St; Eureka 
Branch, oor. 17th and 

Branch, oor, *th Ave and Irving - 

tcelslor 

Branch 

For the half-year ending I> 

B dividend 
fnur < I 

January I 

1 hear 
! from 

I ■ EP< 'SITS M APE T<> A NT) I N't HA I UNO 

JANUARY 'II. EARN INTEREST 
FROM JANUARY t 

P. C KALI 



l mu\ TfcCHT COMPAN1 (»» * \*^ rK\N- 
( IM O, 

- 

dend ha? be 

rt per annu 
ii and aftf r 

Dividends not call* 

the same M' 
Januarv 1. 

January will earn interest from Janu- 

arv 1 

F. J. BRICKWEDEU Cashier. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 13, 1923 




PL/E/ASTJRE/S WAND 



'Obey No Wand but Pleasure's.' 



-Tom Moore. 




Alcazar 

Zoe Akins at her best. This means better 
even than "Declasse" — and when you have 
said that of a play, you have uttered a ver- 
dict indeed. "Daddy's Gone a-Hunting" is 
the title of this clever play now enjoying a 
record run at the Alcazar, and judging from 
the enthusiasm aroused it could fill the thea- 
ter for many weeks to come. Nana Bryant, 
already a prime favorite with Alcazar fans, 
has a role to which her style of acting is 
well suited, and as the wife of Julien Fields 
(played by Dudley Ayres with great effect) 
she makes a good impression. Little Lucille 
Shirpser is acceptable in the part of Janet 
the daughter, but there is something depress- 
ing about a stage child always. Netta Sund- 
erland, Hope Drown, Emmett Vogan and 
Norman Feusier are well cast, and direction 
of Hugh Knox is of unfailing excellence. 



Orpheum Attractions 

Raymond Bone is indulging in a little 
well-deserved rest this week; not having all 
the music directing to attend to he slips 
quietly and unostentatiously from sight while 
Roscoe Ails' orchestra leader waves the baton 
and Ails, the popular dancing comedian, 
with Kate Pullman and Charles Calvert, re- 
gale the audience with their varied and di- 
verting entertainment. Eddie Leonard in the 
second week of "Minstrel's Delight" is the 
recipient of hearty applause. Bert Fitzgib- 
bon is the original "Daffy Dil" and just 
about as funny as a fellow can be. Wil- 
fred Clarke, Grace Menken and a first-rate 
company present the comedy "Now What?" 
with fine effect. Jack Hanley is a comic 
pantomimist, Edward Miller a singer of songs 
and El Rey Sisters are dancers of much 
agility. "The Service Station" with William 
Hallen and Mabel Russell are having an- 
other week of success. 



Granada 

One does not quite know why they call 
it "Heroes of the Street" unless the refer- 



SANFRAHCISCO 



TWE GtST W W N/WDfc^H-Vt 




I 



MA ™ 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted in Dress Circle 
and Iiogea 



ence is to policemen, and they are not sup- 
posed to confine their heroism to the street 
altogether, are they? However, it is not for 
us to quibble. The play starring young Wes- 
ley Barry is a good strong production, with 
scenes of the home life of a New York po- 
liceman that are very appealing. Very plotty. 
too, with blackmailing villains, noble news- 
papermen, mysterious menservants and oc- 
casional comic relief by the clever little lad 
who is playing the leading role. Wesley is 
outgrowing his baby-boyhood and snaggle- 
tooth stage of youth, and he is now a tall 
and lanky youngster with plenty of freck- 
les, a friendly grin, and an earnest desire 
to manage the glycerine tear which must 
trickle ever so often down his pleasant 
young face. The emotional scenes which he 
is put through by a well-meaning but mis- 
taken dramatist, are rather painful, but in 
the rough and tumble ones, the simply af- 
fectionate ones, the regular boy ones, he is 
satisfactory to all his admirers. 



California 

All's grist that comes to the mill of the 
press agent. Wallace Reid's enormous popu- 
larity this week in "Thirty Days" proves the 
statement, for in truth this is a very ordin- 
ary play and Reid is an ordinary young 
actor, good looking, pleasant mannered, to 
be sure, but no great actor, no famous 
comedian to draw the thousands of people 
daily and nightly to see him. No, it is 
not his histronic genius that attracts us. It 
is a devouring curosity to "see how Wally 
looks after the awful experience (you know) 
he has been through." Did friend agent- 
de-press guess it would be thus? Did he? 
He knows a little about human nature, that 
fellow. 



Sequoia 

The presentation of four one-act plays 
opened the new season at the Sequoia Lit- 
tle Theater on Saturday evening. "Com- 
edies from Four Nations" is the intriguing 
classification of this month's plays. Dun- 
sany's delightfully amusing bit, "The Lost 
Silk Hat," headed the bill and represented 
British humor. Blanche Cumming's clever 
and effective "Piety and Pie" gave America 
her place among the keen wits. A French 
farce by Max Maurey, "Rosalie," was typi- 
cal of the light-hearted land. "A Sunny 
Morning," Spanish comedy by Serafin and 
Joaquin Quintero completed a bill of un- 
common merit, showing care and good 
judgment in arrangement and artistic stage 
setting, exquisite in simplicity and effect. 
That these plays showed more skill in the 
selection and the setting than in produc- 
tion and execution was apparent to an au- 
dience both large and discriminating. 



The Fifth Popular Symphony 

The Curran audience gave the symphonic 
orchestra a great amount of praise on Mon- 
day and the leader, Alfred Hertz, gave his 
opening number an extraordinary worth and 
power. This was Beethoven's overture "Eg- 
mont." This masterpiece is based upon the 
stirring events of the struggle of the Nether- 
lands against the Spaniard and this over- 
ture is a synopsis of the events leading up 
to the execution of Egmont. It was a vivid 
and moving reading. The lightness of the 
Mozart concerto was followed by another of 
the wonder pieces of music, the "Entrance 
of the Gods Into Walhalla," from the 
"Rheingold." The second half of the pro- 
gram contained the "Dance Macabre," the 
"Dance of the Hour's Ballet," from "La 
Gioconda," and the "Rakocsy March of 
Berlioz." 



Century 

Little Jackie Coogan, the child with the 
soulful eyes and the enterprising parents, is 
making an epoch in motion picture acting 
with his remarkable portrayal of that classic 
martyr-child figure of fiction, Dickens' 
"Oliver Twist." The performance is a 
noteworthy one throughout, the large cast 
of all the old and fondly familiar Dickens 
characters being selected with unerring 
care, and from pompus Mr. Bundle to puny 
Oliver the types are perfect and true to 
form. Lon Chaney's Fagin is a work of 
genius. The burly and brutal Bill Sykes, 
tragic Nancy, beaming Mr. Brownlow, 
slinking Noah Claypole, the nimble Artful 
Dodger — all the old friends and foes are 
there and ably impersonated. Taylor Graves 



Instruments for the Deaf 
Special Demonstration 

Experts now demonstrating the newest 

: i ml smallest instrument for the deaf, the 

PHONOI'HOB 

Roaring and buzzing sounds eliminated. 
Receiver is worn in the ear and is almost 
Invisible, 

l'OKT-O-I'HONK 

An improved electrical instrument for Hie 
deaf or slightly deaf will be found to be 
a great aid. 

Exclusive Agents. 

W. D. Fennlmore A. R. Fennlmor* 




^ 



se^r 



mtim 



San Francisco - 181 Post, 2508 Mission Sts. 
Berkeley - 2106 Shattuck Avenue 

Oakland ------ 1221 Broadway 



January 13. 1923 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



17 



Jul a i level bil ol s Charley Bates 

one "I Fagio s promising pupils, and made 
one wisli to see him oflenei than we do. 



Symphony Orchestra 

The remarkable young Russian pianist, 
Benno Moieseivitch, will be the guest artist 
at the fourth popular concert of the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra, to be given 
at the Exposition auditorium on Thursday 
evening, February I. When this veritable 
master of technique first played in this city 
some two years ago he created a genuine 
furore, and since that time he has been 
playing with unvarying success in all parts 
of the globe. He recently completed a tri- 
umphant series of recitals in Australia, in 
which every musical country he was ac- 
corded an ovation. The late James Hune- 
ker, a pianist himself, was first attracted 
with Moieseivitch's beautiful touch. He also 
claimed him more than a mere technician, 
but a player with brains and soul, as well 
as with the fleetest of fingers. 

Conductor Alfred Hertz is preparing an- 
other big program for this concert and J, 
Emmet Hayden, chairman of the auditorium 
committee of the board of supervisors, di- 
recting the affair, urges that those who de- 
sire to hear Moieseivitch in conjunction with 
the orchestra make reservation immediately 
at Sherman, Clay & Co. Seats will range in 
price from 25 cents to $1, as usual. 



Popular Lecture by Dr. W. W. Campbell 

Dr. W. W. Campbell, director of the Lick 
Observatory and president-elect of the Uni- 
versity of California, will discuss "The 
Eclipse of the Sun of September 21, 1922," 
at Native Sons' hall on Friday, January 
19, at 8 p. m. This will be the second of 
the present series of free popular illustrated 
lectures to be given under the auspices of 
the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. It 
is not probable that the measurements and 
calculations based on the photographs of the 
eclipse as taken by the Crocker expedition 
at Walla, Australia, will be sufficiently ad- 
vanced to permit Dr. Campbell to speak def- 
initely of the results in relation to the Ein- 
stein theory. But in any event he will ex- 
plain the bearing of the eclipse measure- 
ments on this theory and wherein it is of 
so much importance to science in general. 
The lecture is open to the public. 



Alcazar 

"The Outrageous Mrs. Palmer," Is a some- 
what unusual title of the offering selected 
by Thomas Wilkes as the next Alcazar at- 
traction beginning Sunday matinee. Janu- 
ary 14. It is not what the name would in- 
dicate, a problem play, but on the contrary 
is one of the most unique and altogether 
delightful comedies produced on the Ameri- 
can stage in several seasons. 

The temperamental tributes which most 
persons associate with the average actre-s or 
prima donna is the subject taken by the au- 
thor. Harry Wagstaff Cribble, in creating his 
plot. 



I le has written Ins play around the pel 
sonality of one of the actresses ol the Eng- 
lish speaking stage, 

"The Outrageous Mrs. Palmer" was first 
presented in New York at the Thirty-ninth 
Street theater with Mary Young in the title 
role. It had previously enjoyed a long run 
in Boston and the critics were a unit in prais- 
ing it as a novel and original comedy with 
many unique situations. 



THE TONOPAH NORTH STAR 

The stockholders of the Tonopah North 
Star Tunnel and Development Co. have been 
advised of an assessment on their stock to 
provide for the development and exploration 
of a piece of territory which has been 
deemed advisable to explore on the advice 
of the company's geologist and their engi- 
neers. It is the intent to spend from fifty 
to seventy-five thousand dollars in this work. 
The circular advising the stockholders of the 
assessment is well worth reading as it shows 
advantageous arrangements entered into by 
which a great deal of expense will be saved 
the North Star and the development carried 
on by the Tonopah-Belmont people. 



HOTEL PLA7A 

SAH FRANCISCO 



DINING-ROOM 

Surprisingly good meals 
pleasingly served. Note 
the moderate prices: 

ireakfaat 25c to 75c 

l.ii ml 65c 

Dinner SI. 35 
(A la Carte Service also) 




ALLIANCE FRANCAISE 

The Council of Administration will award 
the prizes which are destined to the scholars 
of the French Alliance on Sunday, the Nth 
of January, at 1:30 in the afternoon. This 
function will take place at Knights of Co- 
lumbus hall. 150 Golden Gate avenue. 



FRANK G. DRUMM IS BETTER 

The report comes that Frank G. Drumm is 
recovering from the effect of an operation. 
He is at the Dante sanitarium. The report 
is that his physicians say he may receive 
visitors in a few days. 



TO BUILD NEW GYM 

The University of Santa Clara will build 
a new gymnasium and swimming pool. The 
J. S. Sampson Company of San Francisco 
are the builders. This building will be 130 
by 98 feet and the pool will be 100 by 40 
feet and 10 feet deep. This pool will 
be situated under the gymnasium proper. Gus 
Petersen, the trainer of the university eleven, 
drew the plans for the tank. 



"It's the little touches that count," said 
the artist. 

"Righto," said the man with a bevy of 
poor relations. 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY 

63 Acres For Sale 



Ideally situated. Gently rolling. Beautiful Las Uvas creek, 
never ending water supply, runs for one-half mile through center 
of property. Bungalow, tank house, small orchard, thousands 
of cords of wood along creek. Forty acres can be cultivated. 
Nine miles from Morgan Hill on Las Uvas road, or twenty- 
one miles from San Jose via Almaden road. 



Price $9000 



Apply Owner, Room 382 
235 Montgomery St., San Francisco 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 13, 1923 





Fred Kahn 

Automotive Engineering in it3 
Entirety 

UNDER ONE ROOF 






General Repairing and Overhauling 

Fender and Ignition 
Radiator Work Welding 
Body Building Brazing 
Woodwork Blacksmithing 
Machine Work Electrical 
t arburetion 






Experts in Every Branch 
1507 SUTTER Telephone West 8296 

Authorized Elgin Parts and Service 





The Automobile 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a little better than seems necessary" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold in similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
37-45 First Street - - San Francisco 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Hoars : 2 till 4, and by Appointment 

Phone Sutler 1718 

REMOVED TO 

Howard Building:, 209 Post Street 

Corner Grant Avenue. San FrancUco 



Quality 1866--66 Years-1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Burltngame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodaide 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Francisco Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 



TYPEWRITERS 

Guaranteed Factory Rebuilt 
All MakeS EBNTBD 

ri.il iTian.co repaired 
See the New Remington Portable 
The Standard Keyboard Portable 

Paper — Ribbons — Carbon — Supplies 
AMERICAN WRITING MACHINE CO. 

506 Market St., Ban Fran. Phone Doug. 649 
308 12th St., Oakland Phone Oakland 2764 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 301 San Francisco 



The Oakland Auto Show 

The big auto show at Oakland bids fair to 
be one of the most successful ever pulled 
off in the west. , This begins on the 1 3th 
and continues until the 20th. Every make 
of automobile and automotive accessory, 
tractors and power driven vehicles as motors 
will be shown. The list of exhibitors and 
their products is like a catalog of all that 
is best in the business. The show itself will 
be most attractive from the standpoint of 
artistic effects and great care will be taken 
to mass the coloring so as to please the eye. 
A complete program of most attractive fea- 
tures will greet the visitor in every direc- 
tion and repay anyone for a visit to the big 
show. 



Motor Advance in War 

The advance into the Ruhr district of 
Germany and the control of the country 
around Essen would have been a task im- 
possible to accomplish if it was not for the 
development that has taken place in the 
motor equipment of cannon and other en- 
gines for warfare by the French and other 
nations in recent years. The commissary 
and quartermaster's department could not 
possibly have advanced fast enough to keep 
up with the army sent by the trainload into 
the occupied country. But by the use of the 
motor truck and the lorrie the stores of these 
departments have kept pace in movement 
with the rest of the army. The great guns, 
which have been moved into the Ruhr coun- 
try, have gone forward on their train car- 
riages but the ammunition necessary to make 
these effective has had to be moved by 
motor truck, too. The motor truck and the 
passenger automobile have taken the place 
of the horse and are just as rapid in their 
movements as are troop trains. 



Those Bay Bridges 

Now that a start has been made in provid- 
ing the bay with bridges through private 
initiative and funds, there should be no diffi- 
culty in getting the bridge built at San 
Francisco. Every owner of an automobile 
or truck is interested in forwarding any 
movement which will guarantee the early 
building of this bridge, or, if necessary, of 
two bridges between the big metropolis and 
Oakland. The building of such a bridge 
will have an almost immediate effect in 
improving the business of both cities and 
this, of itself, should be inducement enough 
to attract the encouraging attention of the 
owner of automobiles for pleasure or for 
trade. Build the bridge now. 



Customer — Can you tell me where I'll find 
misses hose? 

Saleslady — In what department is she? 



"I read somewhere that Chinamen are the 
most honest people on earth." 

"Yes, and they are starving to death." 




Heavens! 
John/ 





PRICES 

1 t,\ A SET 

tight Can 

S20 

Mrdium H'fltht 

Curj SSO 
Ihuu, Wtilhl 



Don't drive so fast.l nearly 
hit the roof ! n 
You can drive as fast as 
your conscience permits 
over any road and you 
won't hear any murmurs 
from the rear seat if you 
let us equip your car with 
Star Rebound Controllers. 

CTA n REBOUND 
9 JLr»« CONTROLLER 

J. P. SCHILLER COMPANY 

933 Geary Street 
Pros. 587 San Francisco 



LEE S. DOLSON CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per (lay; 87.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
$1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinner* 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



Suits Preyed by Hand, Only — 
SaitM Called fur and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 
433 Manon St. Phone Franklin 2510 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint jot guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3419 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 30th, 1922 

Assets $80,671,392.53 

Deposits 76,921,392.53 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,750,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 400,613.61 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAICHT STREET BRANCH Haipht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter 

(4J4) P er cent per annum was declared for the six 

months ending December 31st, 1922. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 
Anglo-London-Paris Company 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 5600 
San Francisco, Calif. 



RECOMMENDS 



Irrigation District Bonds 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE niore secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 

first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6 3 4% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION" DISTRICT BOND 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Jlj.000.000 Rmivf Fond 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

486 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager 



450 CALIFORNL1 STREET 

W. J. COVMHAKO, Assistant Manager 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to II p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



Electrical Repairs, Making ami 

Spraying, Electrical Fixtures, 

Wiring, Supplies 

Goldberg Electric Co. 

KI.Kl Title ' \ I, ( 'OXTIt.M T( IKS 

•2<)M Polk Street 
Phone Prospect 7528 



s\\ FRANCISCO 



< \MF. 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.).... 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Bandars and Holidays. $1. 75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enl.ircr*! and Improved 

•Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 



STATEMENT 
Of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

HIBERNIA BANK 
Dated San Francisco, December 30, 1922 

ASSETS 

1 — Bonds of the United States ($13,449,900.00) of the State of Cali- 
fornia and the Counties. Cities and School Districts thereof 
($1S,595,200.00), of the State of New York ($2,149,000.00), 
of the City of New York ( $1,139, 000. 00) , of the State of Massa- 
chusetts ($1,162,000.00), of the State of Nevada ($100,000.00), 
of the State of Michigan ($60,000.00), of the State of Oregon 
($51,000.00), of the County of Lane, Or. ($200,000.00), of 
the County of Bergen, N. J. ($160,000.00), of the County of 
Douglas, Or. ($147,000.00), of the County of Jackson, Or. 
($S4,000.00), of the County of Clackamas, Or. ($73,950.00), 
of the County of Cuyahoga, Ohio ($23,000.00), of the City 
of Chicago, 111. ($643,000.00), of the City of Philadelphia, 
Penn. ($350,000.00), of the City of Cincinnati, Ohio ($250,- 
000.00), of the City of Cleveland, Ohio ($205,000.00), of 
the City of Albany, N. Y. ($200, 000. 00), of the City of St. 
Paul, Minn. ($100,000.00), of the City of San Antonio, Texas 
($62,000.00), of the City of Jersey City, N. J. ($50,000.00), 
of the City of Detroit, Mich. ($50,000.00), of the City of Port- 
land, Or. ($50,000.00), of the City of Daytou, Ohio ($25,- 
000.00), the actual value of which is $38,773,778.70 

2 — Miscellaneous Bonds comprising Steam Railway Bonds ($1,768,- 
000.00), Street Railway Bonds ($994,000.00), Quasi-Public 
Corporation Bonds ($2,136,000.00), and Bank Stocks ($21,- 
125.00), the actual value of which is 4,464,430.87 

3 — Cash on Hand , 3,633,517.44 

4 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the actual value 

of which is 29,713,515.50 

Said Promissory Notes are all existing Contracts, owned by 
said Corporation, and the payment thereof is secured by First 
Mortgages on Real Estate within this State, and the States of 
Oregon, Nevada, Washington and Utah. 

5 — Promissory Xotes and the debts thereby secured, the actual value 

of which is 304,855.00 

Said Promissory Notes are all exis.ing Contracts, owned by 
said Corporation, and are payable at its office and the payment 
thereof is secured by pledge of Bonds and other securities. 

6 — (a) Beal Estate situated in the City and County of San Francisco 
($445,417.19), and in the Counties of San Mateo ($1.00), 
Contra Costa ($32,073.05), Monterey ($65,203.13), and San 
Luis Obispo ($93,147.33), in this State, the actual value of 

which is 635,841.70 

(b) The Land and Building in which said Corporation keeps its 

said office, the actual value of which is 953,423.75 

Total Assets $78,569,362.96 

LIABILITIES 

1 — Said Corporation owes Deposits amounting to and the actual value 

of which is $74,619,119.90 

2 — Reserve Fund 3,950,243.06 

Total Liabilities $78,569,362.90 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

By E. J. TOBIN, President. 
THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
By R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 
STATE OF CALIFORNIA, 
City and County of San Francisco — ss. 

E. J. TOBIN and R. M. TOBIN, being each duly sworn, each for himself says: 
That said E. J. TOBIN is President and that said R. M. TOBIN is Secretary of 
THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, the Corporation above men- 
tioned, and that the foregoing statement is true. 

E. J. TOBIN, President. 
R. M. TOBIN. Secretary. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 3rd day of January, 1923. 

CHAS. T. STANLEY, 
Notary Public in and for the City and County of 
San Francisco, State of California. 



Jl 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



California Advertiser 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1923 



$5.00 PER YEAR 
LOS ANGELES 




Sailing Close 
to the Wind m 
San Francisco 
Bay 




The Mother Goose 
Confections 

Here is Something G JS[ew! 

A confection made of California's most 
perfect fruits and berries, scientifically pro- 
cessed, chocolate-coated or "candied" in 
tneir own juices. 

The natural sugar of the fruits produces a 
PERFECT Candy. 

Dipped in chocolate perpetuates the nat- 
ural exquisite flavor and fragrance. 

ioo Varieties, jc to $1.50 Each 

( >ne pound box by mail postpaid, $1.00. 

Send a box to your eastern friends. 

Visit our Art Gallery of Mother Goose 
painting's by Chas. A. Holland, the world's 
famed artist. 

^Mother Cjoose Confection Co., Inc. 

1214 Market St., San Francisco 



Another Guaranteed Gardner 




We extend to the 19 23 Gardner a one-year 
WRITTEN GUARANTEE 

— Because it is a Four, with the assured economy found 
in Fours alone. 

— Because the FIVE-BEARING CRANKSHAFT, a fea- 
ture found in no other four-cylinder motor, makes 
possible exceptional power and flexibility without 
the vibration that shortens the life of engines less 
well built. 

— Because it is a car of BALANCED VALUE, with a 
sturdy chassis; well-built, comfortable body; last- 
ing finish — a car made for long and trouble-free 
service. 

— Because it is the product of an organization that has 
served the public with dependable transportation for 
more than 40 years. 

Let us demonstrate the 1923 Gardner. The story is best 
told on the road 

J. W. FRAWLEY, Inc. 

1135 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Prospect 9160 



1 



r 



Fill in and mail this blank to Mr. I 
Hill. No obligation entailed. i 



Name 

Address 

Age nearest birthday. 



[_. 



.J 



It isn't the amount that's saved that 
COUNTS; it's the HABIT. Celebrate this 
Thrift Week by STARTING to SAVE 10 
cents a day and GUARANTEE 

YOURSELF $1,000 if you LIVE; 
Your BENEFICIARY $1,000 if 
you DIE 

ARTHUR J. HILL 

California Manager 
State Life Insurance Company of Indiana 

l(i2i> .Market St., San Francisco 




Announcing the Completion 

of the Red Square 

Vacuum Cup Cord Line! 

We are positive no tire ever introduced was accepted 
with the whole-hearted enthusiasm that marked the an- 
nouncement of Pennsylvania Red Square Vacuum Cup 
Cord Tires in Ford sizes. 

The reasons are obvious: 

Cord tires which strictly maintain the Penn- 
sylvania standard of highest quality; 

Cord tires readily interchangeable with the 
thousands of fabric tires now in use; 

Cord tires selling at prices so moderate as to 
make the change from fabric to cord equip- 
ment a matter of actual economy. 

TANSEY- CROWE COMPANY 

1233 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Prospect 2000 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 186 6 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. CII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1923 



No. 3 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott. 3 82 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets. 
San Francisco. Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco. 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



— What our soldier boys are singing in Germany: "The Rhine 

may be fine, but a cold stein for mine 

¥ * * 

— "Roumania begins mobilization as Balkan States seethe in un- 
rest." Well, what else can be expected from such balky creatures? 

* * # 

- Our troops are being recalled from the Rhine. They should 
have been recalled just five years, two months and nine days ago. 

— Senator Slater urges an appropriation to encourage county 
fairs, and to stimulate better agriculture and horticulture and the 
breeding of live stock, all of which The News Letter endorses. 

— "I can easily understand," said a visitor from Southern Cali- 
fornia the other day, as she struggled up one of our highest hills, 
"why goat gland transplanting would appeal to a San Franciscan. 

— The numerous parodies that are appearing every day in the 
press upon Coue's famous lines: "Every day, in every way, etc,, 
show that at least we have not lost one remnant of Americanism — 

our national sense of humor. 

* * ¥ 

— At a recent school dedication in a suburb of San Francisco 
one of the orators of the afternoon expressed himself as follows, 
in comparing the educational advantages of our time with those 
of the pioneer days of California: "Them pore fore-fathers of 
ours," he said feelingly, "they certainly had their trials and trib- 
utes." 

* * * 

— Which reminds me of a story which a friend told lately of a 
prominent attorney's wife, who was describing, over tea cups, a 
house which one of her acquaintances was having erected. "It is 
to be built with a big patois," she said enthusiastically, "in the 
Spanish style." "You mean patio, don't you?" inquired one of 
the listeners. "I mean just what I said," was the indignant answer: 

"Patois!" 

* * * 

— Coue is now being compared by Dr. Percy Stickney Grant, 
rector of the fashionable Episcopal church of the Ascension in 
New York, to Jesus Christ, and is raising a storm thereby. We en- 
dorse the remark of Conan Doyle, in regard to Mrs. Eddy, whose 
teachings were more or less on the auto-suggestive lines: "I have 
two things against Mrs. Eddy." he has said; "one is. that she be- 
came very rich, and the other is that she died." 



— The 20 cent postage stamps advocated by Senators Shortridge 
and Johnson, whereon San Francisco's skyline, ferry tower and the 
Golden Gate will be portrayed, is a splendid mode of advertising 
our section of the state, and has the approval of the San Francisco 
News Letter. Gradually the people of this section are becoming 
more alive to the value and necessity of boosting Northern Cali- 
fornia. 

— Mme. Maeterlinck, who has made the very sweeping state- 
ment that "American women are angels," has come to a different 
conclusion than the one with which a fellow countryman of her's 
summed up women in general. He said: "There are four kinds 
of women in the world: the good women and the bad women and 
the good bad women and the bad good women." We are inclined 
to agree with the latter's opinion. 

— In this present age of jazz, all our most treasured illusions 
are being shattered. William Dean Howell tells us in his "Venetian 
Life," that the only class of Venetians who have not good voices 
are the Gondoliers. After all the romantic tales that we have de- 
voured describing honeymoons on the Grand Canal, and the bride 
and bridegroom listening to the plaintively exquisite songs of the 
Gondoliers! 

* * * 

— Apropos of the little tiff which Badaracco, the moist states- 
man from San Francisco, and Joe Burns (who, like his poet name- 
sake, evidently believes in a "wee drappit") had with T. M. Wright, 
the arid patriot, over a bottle of lacteal fluid at the senate session 
now being held in Sacramento, in the "Cave of the Winds" — they 
should have appreciated the scene in the "Young Rajah." where 
Valentino, as host at a college supper, pours forth Omar's nectar 
from a lot of very innocent looking and white milk bottles. 

* * * 

When prohibition first went into effect (of course it never has 
been in effect, but you know what we mean) someone who was 
in a position to know whereof he spoke, informed us that the liquor 
interests were backing this so-called prohibition measure. This 
statement was laughed to scorn at the time. Since then events 
have certainly proved the truth of his words. We wonder if the 
liquor interests would welcome back the days of the old regime, 
when whisky could be bought for 85 cents a quart and good red 
wine for $1 a gallon! 

* * * 

— We are always prone to assume airs of superiority in talking 
of atrocities which happened in other periods of time, forgetting 
that the present age. although wonderfully progressive as regards 
its inventions, is hardly less barbarous in its attitude toward hu- 
manity than in the days before the French revolution. Then the 
carriages of the nobility would mow down the "canaille" who were 
not quick enough to get out of the way of prancing hoofs, al- 
most as recklessly and thoughtlessly as the motorist of today knocks 
down the unfortunate pedestrian. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 20, 1923 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




When any organization of citizens does 
A Grateful Community things, which result in benefit to the entire 
population of a town or city, regardless 
of affiliation or belief, and this good is manifested in the wider and 
more frequent circulation of the dollar among the people, while 
at the same time establishing a truth then it is time for the com- 
munity so benefited to give thanks to such an organization. 

Reference is here had to the work accomplished and the prin- 
ciples firmly fixed through practice by the Industrial Association of 
the city of San Francisco. This association is responsible for the 
introduction in San Francisco's industrial life of the principles under 
which the American plan is operated in the relations between the 
employed and the employer. It has been said a popular error exists 
that such relations usually have nothing to do with any question 
except that of the wage, which is to be paid and the popular idea 
still does exist in some quarters that the Industrial Association fixes 
the wages in all crafts, regardless of the demands or the rights of 
labor whether this be organized labor or free. 

Nothing, we are told, could be farther from the truth. It is true 
that those who are members have a very clear idea as to what 
wage should be paid but that wage is really a factor which is de- 
cided by demand and supply. For instance, the wages being paid 
today on construction work is in nearly every instance higher than 
that set by individual contractors carrying on the construction work. 
The demand for labor being far in excess of the supply the wage 
dictated by the circumstances is higher than any set wage which 
could be arrived at by the employer and the reverse will be true 
should the demand become less than the supply and then, of course, 
wages will quite logically drop. 

The employed may not quarrel with the law of supply and de- 
mand with any more success than may the employer. 



The American plan has been a great boon 
The American Plan to the people of San Francisco and the grati- 
tude of the community is due those who have 
banded themselves together to assure to all a chance to work for 
a living at a living wage and to enable the employer to have a 
voice that will be effective in ensuring a just settlement of all labor 
disputes. 

The one great thing accomplished by the Industrial Association 
has been the establishment of an industrial peace, which has 
now lasted for more than a year. During that year everyone 
who was willing to work has been employed at a wage that has 
been higher than that established by the labor board. 

The future seems to guarantee a continuance of like conditions, 
in the building line especially, and there is to be an extraordinary 
activity in every direction. Not the least of many benefits accruing 
to this American plan community has been the lifting of the repu- 
tation off of San Francisco of being a town "ridden arbitrarily and 
tyrannically by the labor unions" and "by the labor union bosses." 
There are just as many unions as ever in San Francisco but they 
seem to be busy attending to their business legitimately and their 
members are, in many instances, working amicably side by side 
with free men and women, who do not belong to the unions. This 
condition in industrial circles has had the result of bringing to 
San Francisco many more free workers, who have hitherto shunned 
it as a "union city." The presence of these men and women and 
their families has not, as was freely predicted, lowered the wage 
scale in many instances. Everyone seems to be contented and there 



is no "strong-arm union gang" going around slugging the free 
workers or harassing them in their homes and in private life. 

The condition in industrial circles, as to the employed and the 
employer, approaches the ideal and it is the aim of a great ma- 
jority of the people to keep conditions in such a shape that union 
members, and those who are not in the unions, may peacefully 
pursue their callings. We are told that the Industrial Association 
is growing in strength, by virtue of new members who are being 
added to its rolls. Certainly no association, and there has been a 
number of them, has ever reached the number of members given 
as being in this association. It is said that this membership amounts 
to more than 10,000 and that this membership comprises people in 
every kind of business and in every sort of manufacturing enter- 
prise. 

The treasury is, quite naturally on account of this membership, 
in a very healthy condition and this is the main deterrent which 
prevents any union from rushing headlong into a strike when any 
difference arising may quite easily be settled in some other more 
profitable and more peaceful way. 

The strike and the boycott, with that other relic of older and 
more barbarous times, the lock-out, should no longer be used, and 
if the American plan continues to function with the success which 
has attended its establishment in San Francisco we may say good- 
bye to these bungling instruments in industrial settlements forever. 
The strike never has paid any union using it against the employer 
and the boycott is a brutal and stupid way to arrive at anything 
like a solution of labor troubles. 

We are now looking forward under the American plan to a pros- 
perous year in San Francisco and it is hoped the principles under- 
lying the use of the plan may be incorporated in every activity 
in this city where labor is employed. Adopting the American plan 
is about the only way to ensure for any length of time the con- 
tinuance of prosperity to all callings. 



The feeling now existing in San Francisco has 
Industrial Peace not been felt in years. It used to be that, despite 

any effort on the part of those who pay the bills 
and employ labor, the conditions under which any kind of work, 
and especially that of building construction, were dictated by the 
active and more militant of the unions, through active and mili- 
tantly inclined labor leaders who seemed to take the greatest of 
pleasure in befogging a situation and making it as difficult as pos- 
sible to arrive at a just settlement, except under arbitrary terms, 
arrived at in advance by the labor leaders. 

By far the worst part of the situation under union rule was the 
fact that courts of the city, with but few exceptions, most of 
them were fearful of action to be taken by the unions at the time 
of elections. And because of this it was almost impossible to find 
judges who would deal fairly as between man and man in a labor 
quarrel. The so-called "strike-breaker" became a professional and 
he was hunted by the union men and he in turn hunted the union 
man, whenever the chance came his way. This was an intolerable 
situation, one that was accepted by union men because there seemed 
to be no escape from it. The non-union man accepted this situa- 
tion, too, because it paid him to so do and he then worked as a 
strike breaker. Now, that we have industrial peace the strike 
breaker, of the professional variety, is no longer in evidence and 
the free worker has taken his place. This class of worker is on 
the increase in nearly every large American city where the American 
plan has been given a chance to show what it could do for the 



January 20. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



people and the same is true of San Francisco. The American plan 
has increased our population with a lot of newcomers who have 
elected to make San Francisco their permanent place of abode. 



Private Employment 
Agencies 



In the senate session now being held at Sac- 
ramento Senator Charles W. Godsil of San 
Francisco advocates amending the code regu- 
lating private employment agencies; prohibiting 
any charge for registration and assessing from $250 to $1000 for 
licenses. 

The writer has had every opportunity for studying the employ- 
ment agent in his native lair; every chance to become familiar with 
all his "tricks and manners"; his exhorbitant charges, his usually 
utter lack of discrimination toward the people whom he sends out 
for positions. 

Lack of a national employment bureau for clerical workers, and 
also lack of time on the part of the employer, are the two good 
reasons which have brought the private employment agency into 
prominence as a medium between the ones who hire help and the 
help themselves. We have no personal animosity toward the em- 
ployment agent as a man or a woman; as a rule we found him 
or her courteous, helpful and quite human. We are merely deploring 
the circumstances which allow him or her to live and flourish at the 
expense of the working class. 

The ordinary business man finds that it takes less time to ring 
up an agency, describe the sort of employe he wants, and interview 
two or three, or more, if he happens to be of a particular turn of 
mind, than it would take him to write out an advertisement, insert 
it in the newspaper, and perhaps have to meet and talk with the 
scores who would answer it. 

We can look at it from his standpoint, and thoroughly appreciate 
these facts. We can also understand that the employment agent 
has many and sometimes heavy expenses to meet; the up-keep of 
his offices, the salaries of his assistants, the publishing of his bulle- 
tins. Sometimes he comes into contact with applicants who are 
clever enough to beat him out of his commission; men and women 
who take positions out of town, and from whom he never hears 
again. But such instances are the exception, not the rule, and the 
private employment agent as a rule has the advantage every time. 
The ordinary working woman is an honest creature — or she wouldn't 
be working! 

The fact remains that the employment agent, at present, under 
the existing circumstances, appears to be a necessary evil. He is 
an evil, though, which could be eliminated. If the federal or state 
government will not come forward and institute a bureau of em- 
ployment for all vocational workers in all cities, with a nominal 
fee to be charged, then the municipal government of all cities should 
be compelled by its citizens to open up such agencies, charging a 
10 per cent commission to be paid upon acceptance of position. The 
usual fee that is charged at present by the private employment 
agent is 25 per cent of the first month's wages, if paid at once. 
30 or 35 per cent if paid within a month's time, and an extra 25 
per cent is added to this if the applicant takes more than a month 
to pay. 

It appears to the writer that the newspapers themselves are rather 
blind to the fact that if all employers were obliged to advertise for 
all their employes it would mean a much bigger revenue than they 
now gain by advertising the employment agencies. Even should a 
municipal employment bureau be established, it would be obliged 
to advertise its positions, just as the private concerns do now. and 
there would still be plenty of employers who would prefer to ad- 
vertise direct for their help. 

In any event, it would appear that Senator Godsil's measure is 
one which is not going to bring about the desired good to the 
working masses, for an increased license tax placed on the private 
employment agency means, in the end, an increased acceptance fee 



put upon the applicant. As regards the registration fee, of which 
the senator speaks, we have not, in our numerous peregrinations, 
come across any agency so far which charges a "registration fee." 
The fee that is charged is the acceptance fee, and we have always 
found that that was quite enough! 

Senator Godsil, in our opinion, has not found a remedy in his 
proposed amendment. The only remedy for the private employ- 
ment agency evil is to institute a municipal employment bureau 
for all vocational workers, with a 10 per cent fee. 



Act/on Needed on the 
Question of Transportation 



As street railway facilities now exist 
in San Francisco, the would-be pas- 
senger on Market street is in danger 
of losing his life every time he at- 
tempts to board a Market Street Railway Company car, for the cars 
of the Municipal railway intervene at every safety (?) station, 
forcing him to either dart in front of the Municipal car or in the 
rear, or, if he should wait until the Municipal car passes he is very 
apt to see the Market Street Railway car, which he desires to board, 
start off on its unconcerned way without him. 

Then again, a stranger in the city lands at the Third and Town- 
send street depot and wishes to reach the ferry. He boards either 
the Ellis street car or the Third and Kearny street car, and gets 
off at Market street. Unaware of our eccentric railway system, he 
takes the first Market street car that comes along, which would 
naturally be the car on the outside track, only to be informed that 
his transfer is not good on the Municipal line. 

At the last election the people of San Francisco approved the 
sale of the Market Street Railways to the city. The mayor was 
to appoint a committee to meet the officials of the Market Street 
Railway Company and have a price put upon the holdings of this 
company, the price decided upon then to be put up for the peo- 
ple's sanction. 

That the Municipal railway is making money is shown by its 
receipts, which are published periodically and by its proposed ex- 
tensions. One of the extensions became a fact only last Sunday, 
when the first car over the new Taraval street line, from Thirty- 
third avenue to the ocean, was operated by Mayor Rolph as motor- 
man, and David J. Tobin as conductor. This line was built at a 
cost of $120,000, and provides direct transportation to the beach 
from the ferry, by way of Twin Peaks tunnel and Taraval street, 
and is designated as line "L" 

Some action should be taken at once upon this matter of street 
car transportation for San Francisco. It is of vital importance to 
every citizen in our environs, and also to the visiting stranger. 



— A sad commentary on the League of Nation* is this: "Reports 
from Memel today indicate that fighting between the French and 
the Lithuians lasted most of the day. Officials fear for the fate of 
the 200 poilus in the area. Memel, a territory of 20,000 inhabi- 
tants, has been under protection of the League of Nations since 
the war. It was captured from Germany in 1915. and then evacu- 
ated. French soldiers have been holding the territory for the League 
of Nations." 



The Sweetness 



The Bitterness 



of Low Prices e r qu> of Poor Quality 



We combine Quality. Price and Service 

JOHNSON BROS., Grocers 

Fillmore St. a( S»rr«ni*nt»— A I lour ( nmniind Plume We«t H9 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 20, 1923 



!i x x xxxrx X x xxx x xx'X x'xx'xxx. x X X XX X xxx XXx X X xx'xx x x gxx XXX XXX X X X X X XX x x x'x v. xxxxxX xxxX'X'm XX X X:X mSiIkSS* x u>u-i 

Vigilantes for the Angelic City | ▼ I 



txxxxxxxxxx x x xxxxxx x x x x x x x xx xx x X: x x x x x x x: XX mxiSl.xmSMx, 



BY J. M. SCANLAND 



AT last Los Angeles has awakened. The people have evidently 
lost confidence in the courts, prohibition enforcement, the 
sheriff's office, and in the police, who are supposed to guard their 
homes and persons from robbery. Ten of the most prominent busi- 
ness men in the city have organized an anti-vice society. Five of 
these are publishers of the five daily newspapers in the city. All 
men in favor of law and order are invited to become members. 
It is stated that committees will be appointed to supervise the con- 
duct of the courts and officials, and if it is found that they are 
evading their official duties the society "will know why," and act 
accordingly. This is plain talk, and if backed by action Los An- 
geles will no longer be the "roughest city in the United States." 
Three "mysterious murders" and several holdups in the streets, in 
the day time, recently led to this action on the part of the ten men. 
These day time robberies were similar to those of frontier days 
when robbers picked men up on the streets, slugged and robbed 
them and rode away. Only the holdups now are conducted in auto- 
mobiles. 

Another reason given for the proposed formation of this society 
is the existence of a gambling ring. At a recent session of the 
city council Mr. Criswell boldly charged that "$5000 a day is paid 
by the gamblers for protection." This is about $1,800,000 a year. 
That is better than a gold mine. The aggressive councilman did 
not say who got the graft, but said that no well meaning police 
official could remain ignorant of the gaming conditions in the city. 
If he did he was incompetent for the position. Another council- 
man asked him why he did not give that evidence to the district 
attorney. To which the stinging reply was given: "You are a 
bunch of prunes to think that anything would come from submit- 
ting this matter to the district attorney's office." 

When such a bold accusation is made publicly by an official against 
officials sworn to protect the lives and property of the people it is 
evidently time for the people to act. The militant councilman fur- 
ther stated that in a recent raid by the police on a gaming house 
about 200 men were seen playing craps, blackjack and other games. 
The games did not even stop when the officers entered. But, a 
flashlight picture was taken of the crowd, the police arrested one 
man, and then proudly marched out. 

Councilman Allan re-enforced Councilman Criswell with the state- 
ment that he "knew of a blind pig right around the corner from 
the Federal building, in which the prohibition officers roost, and 
that this blind pig is running night and day, and among its regular 
customers are several police officers." Notwithstanding this direct 
charge, the council passed a bill allowing the police department 
$15,000 to pay extra officers to look for blind pigs. 

This criticism of the district attorney's office by the councilmen 
is partly based on the numerous criminal cases dismissed for lack 
of evidence sufficient to convict. Two cases are cited, the accused 
persons being charged with murder, and bail denied. Judge Mon- 
roe recently added his disapproval to the practice of the district at- 
torney's office when a motion was made to dismiss a criminal case 
for the alleged lack of convicting evidence. The judge severely criti- 
cized such practice and stated that the office was cluttering up the 
business of the court by such tactics. 

In addition, the district attorney is under fire and there is a 
movement asking for a recall vote, but it will result in nothing. 



Sometime ago the district attorney had trouble with his stenog- 
rapher, and dismissed her. She then publicly charged him with "con- 
tributing to her moral delinquency," and started the recall petition. 
She is backed by two or three of the women's clubs. No doubt 
this charge had some effect on District Attorney Woolwine's recent 
candidacy for the governorship. It is possible, however that he may 
resign and go into the movies. Such is the published report. 
* * * 

With the above as basis for action, the ten leading business men 
have formed the nucleus for a vigilance committee. It is stated that 
every applicant for membership must furnish his record. Only 
men of well known respectability will be admitted, thus preventing 
the criminal element from getting control of the committee. It is 
announced that they do not intend, at present, to take official action, 
but will merely supervise the conduct of the courts and officials. With 
this censor board over them, the officials may see the hand writing 
in the air. It is shown that most of the courts are negligent and 
too lenient to criminals. Sentences that do not fit the crime are 
imposed, and very often the sentences are suspended. There are 
twenty-two courts in the city, the dockets are over crowded, and 
the over-worked judges are clamoring for additional courts. The 
taxpayers insist that the courts should sit longer than six hours a 
day, and should work six days, as the judges are paid for every 
working day. The leniency of the judges in granting low bail is 
also referred to; also their many oversights in the matter of straw- 
bail. The sessions of the justices' courts are referred to as one-act 
farces. That is, farces except as to the color blindness of most of 
the justices in favor of criminals. Heavy and increasing taxes is 
an important element in this move for a reform in all judicial and 
police departments. Again, the Angelic city is losing much of its 
attractiveness as a resort or dwelling place, and the published re- 
ports in the eastern cities and in the coast cities are counteracting 
much of the boom literature that is sent out. 

The committee of ten referred to the over-crowded condition of 
that all-the-year-resort, otherwise the county jail. That sanitarium 
for criminals will be strictly investigated. As an instance of the 
free-and-easy manner in which it is conducted a select committee 
of prisoners, recently handed to the sheriff a collection of fifteen 
hack-saws, with the satirical explanation that they were not needed, 
as the prisoners had changed their minds and would not saw their 
way out. They did not explain why they had decided to remain, 
but the inference is that they are so well treated that they prefer 
the county jail to the state prison. They do not care to risk a trial, 
for they may be convicted, accidently. Here they can remain in- 
definitely at public expense until witnesses die, or their cases are 
dismissed for the "lack of sufficient evidence to convict." But, if 
it comes to the worst, they can walk out as others have done, so 
why use hack-saws? This sounds like a joke, but it is a published 
fact, and not denied by the jailors that the hack-saws were handed 
over to the sheriff. The fact that fifteen such instruments can be 
smuggled into jail evidently calls for drastic action, and the com- 
mittee proposes to fully investigate that institution. 

It has been nearly fifty years since Los Angeles had a vigilance 
committee, and, according to history, murders and robberies are 
more numerous now than in the frontier days, considering the pop- 
ulation of the town at those periods. 



January 20. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



I lave You Heard It? 







Sg_S S >< ~ « ~ a a « = : = ?!»:!«»»;: k.*»[S.k k",;: ; .» ~ :; .!:;:<«:»!!:» :t :< aWHBlBH 



— Here is the latest "Charlie Chaplin" story. On his way to the 
studio one morning recently "Charlie" discovered he was late tor 
an appointment, and told Kono, his Japanese chauffeur, to "hurry 
up a bit." The road stretched perfectly clear for quite a mile 
ahead, with no tricky curves or intersections that could possibly 
have involved the famous little comedian in a charge of manslaughter. 
Suddenly from nowhere there materialized a traffic cop on a motor 
bike. With a fine outburst of profanity he accused the comedian of 

"speeding," and demanded to know where the he thought he 

was driving to. "Charlie" raised his expressive eyebrows in protest 
and surprise, and reprimanded the man severely for his lack of 
self-control. "I shall of course have to report you for using such 
language," he said in conclusion. Then in a very grand manner: 
"And now, officer, do your duty." As the officer, however, seemed 
on the verge of an apoplectic fit and showed no signs of entering 
names and addresses, "Charlie" raised his hat politely, wished him 
a dignified "Good morning," and continued on his way. 

— Mr. Pett Ridge tells a story regarding a man who always wran- 
gled with his wife about the money he brought home on pay night. 
When his wife was especially troublesome about the smallness of 
the amount he handed over to her for housekeeping he always 
threatened to go and hang himself. His wife at last grew tired of 
the mere threat, so on one occasion she told him to go and hang 
himself. She even offered him the rope to do it with, and, looking 
very determined, he took it from her and departed. Sometime aft- 
erwards she found him in an outhouse. He had tied one end of 
the rope to a rafter, and with the other tied around his waist was 
revolving gently in mid-air. "What are you doin?" she asked. 
"Hanging myself," he told her sternly. "Oh," she said, as though 
only mildly interested, "but you ought to tie it round your neck 
and not round your waist." Calling as much dignity to his aid as 
was possible under the circumstances, he replied, "Well, I tried it 

that way and I couldn't breathe." 

* ■ .a 

— "Norah," said Mrs. Deadbeat, from the top of the stairs, "tell 
the man who is ringing the bell that I am not receiving today!" 

The servant girl went to the door and said something to the man; 
then she stepped into the hall and called upstairs: 

"I told him you were not receivin' today, ma'am, but he says 
he ain't deliverin', he's collectin'." 

* ♦ * 

— A teacher was endeavoring to explain a few facts about the 
wind to her class. "Now," she said, "as I was coming up in the 
train this morning, the door of the carriage suddenly opened, some- 
thing came in very softly, and kissed me gently on the cheek. What 
do you suppose that was?" Immediately the cry went up in unison, 
"Please, teacher, the conductor." 



— The following story is told regarding Harry Lauder, who says that 
his greatest bores are strangers who claim old friendship with him. 
On one occasion he was pressed to have a cigar by an individual 
of this description, and, while smoking, he tore the thin red band 
off and threw it away. "Those cigar bands are very valuable," 
protested the giver, "for 200 of them you can get a gramophone 
free." 

"My dear sir," answered the famous comedian, "if ah used 200 
of these smokes ah wudna want a gramophone; but," he added, 
looking toward the skies, "ah wud want a harp." 
* •¥ ¥ 

— The small girl was kneeling beside her bed solemnly saying her 
prayers, when her brother stole softly up behind her and tugged 
her hair. Without turning her head, the child paused and said, 
"Please, Lord, excuse me while I smack Bobbie." 



Mardi Gras 
at New Orleans 



Feb. 8th to 13th 






Feb. 8: Krewe of Momus, Tableaux 
and Ball. 

Feb. 10: "The Assembly" Carnival 
Ball. 

Feb. 12: Krewe of Proteus, Street 
Parade, Tableaux and Ball. 

Feb. 13: Mardi Gras — Public masking 
on streets all day — Rex Street Pa- 
rade — Tableaux and Ball presided 
over by the King and Queen of 
Carnival. 



A ten-da) stop over at New Orleans is allowed on .-ill 
tickets via the 

Sunset Route 

i in mi nil New Orlejuu 
SUNSET LIMITED LEAVES SAN FRANCISCO 

(Tliiril-Street Station) Daily ill .IMMJ p. in. 

null arrives New Orleans 7:85 i>. m. third day 
Our agents will gladly give yon detailed Information, 

Southern Pacific 

50 Pott St Ferry Station Third St. Station 

or Phone Sutter 4000 



Quality 1866-66 Years-192! Quantify 

Our Service Includes Following Places : 

Rurhnf ame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo woodslde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Ofti re ami Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

Kan Franolnro Phone Market VIS 

Nan Mateo Phone San Mateo llll 

Economy DnrablUty 



Smith and Brown began quarrelling about 
their strength. Said Smith: "Do you see 
that muscle } I could stop a train with my 
right arm." 

Brown : "Then you must be a professional 
athlete." 

Smith: "No; I'm an engine-driver." 



"Did that cubist artist inherit his gift?" 
"Presumably. His grandmother was a 
great hand for making crazy-quilts." 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a Utile better than «ffmi nrrf?-n»ry" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold In similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple nook showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
.t7-4."> First Street - - San Francisco 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 20, 1923 




mm 






— Time was when the creation of the naval base at this port 
would have roused the most hearty enthusiasm and we should have 
looked forward to a period of lasting festivity. But festivity has a 
hollow sound these days. The best that we can offer the navy is 
a course in university extension. 

— San Francisco may think the claims of Los Angeles to share 
in the state university ridiculous. That won't go at all. Los An- 
geles is itself ridiculous but manages to survive very well in spite 
of that. Some fine morning we shall see the university at Los An- 
geles unless some local energy is shown. 

— How far we have gone in so short a time. This scribe saw 
a polo game down the peninsula on Saturday, as brilliant and beau- 
tiful as any game anywhere, even in historic Hurlingham, and within 
a generation where they played was mere pasture. It takes much 
shorter than one would think to produce an aristocracy, but to keep 
it, that is another story. 

— Twenty-one Japanese silk merchants in town at the same time, 
and all guests of the Chamber of Commerce, sitting at the same 
table and eating the same food with our merchants, and every- 
body putting themselves out to make them happy. Race antagon- 
isms may make pretty violent reading but economic interest is very 
harmonizing. Bank books seem to be more eloquent than buncombe 
after all. 

— Ferris Hartman tells of the return to favor of comic opera. 
Good comic opera, like Hartman himself, never was out of favor. 
Even the most beautiful have their off days, and the grotesque, 
being a form of beauty, must expect no more. But they come back, 
surely. 

* * * 

— The women of the city, with Mrs. Genevieve Allen at their 
head, are all agog over the community property law. The last 
was defeated upon the ground that it interfered with the security 
necessary for the transaction of business. As for the present law 
we don't know, but it cannot be denied that the ability of mere 
men to meet the requirements of married life is being tried. Mar- 
riage is actually becoming an indiscretion. 

* # * 

— Who would be a publisher? It is quite noticeable how little 
the death of a man like James A. Carey, late of the Adjuster, af- 
fects the community in which he has lived and for which he has 
devoted his efforts. No end of less important people receive more 
notice, and few are really of as great value to a business com- 
munity such as ours. 

¥ * St. 

— The number of buildings increase day by day, but it seems 
to have no effect upon the rents. Either there is a development of 
population of which the news gives no account or there is a prac- 
tical understanding among property owners which offsets the law 
of supply and demand. We trust it is the former but we have our 
doubts. 

* * * 

— A very appropriate name for any part of Europe just now — 
Ouch-yl 



— The prohibition agents report Los Angeles chemically pure 
as regards beverages. Still only a few days ago in a Los Angeles 
restaurant of note the Town Crier saw more pocket flasks in use 
in an hour than he has seen in San Francisco in a month. "Better 
the sight of eyes that see than the yearning of desire." 

— Our future mayor, Harvey H. Toy, has returned from Los 
Angeles, where he was domiciled at the Hotel Rosslyn. From mayor 
of San Francisco to governor of California is not such a high jump 
for Harvey, who is well versed in the art of making himself popu- 
lar, and who is becoming better and better known as an advocate 
of measures that all mean prosperity for our beloved state. 



ROADS MUST BURY THE HATCHET 

The business world, and those who travel, may now breathe 
more freely; an adjustment and an agreement, which seems to be 
agreeable to all and the news of which has been enthusiastically 
received in San Francisco and all over the state, by which the 
roads are to remain separate identities but the control of the Union 
Pacific and the Southern Pacific Company is to be vested in the 
officials of the latter line. The report is that the president of the 
Union Pacific road had accepted the arrangement and that every- 
thing had been agreed to except the arrangement of minor traffic 
details. The plan is one which was suggested to the railroad officials 
by the Interstate Commerce Commission. Omaha thus loses a chance 
to have a road of its own from that city to San Francisco. 

The struggle for the control of the Central lines by the two roads 
has been long and hard and it is pleasing to everyone concerned 
that it is at length so amicably arranged by the commission. 

This rail arrangement is by far the most importan* event in rail 
and commercial history which has transpired in the west in a very 
long time and the merchandising world has received the news with 

joy- 



Figure What Road 
Vibration Costs! 

Take the motor out of your automobile. 
Put in on a solid foundation. Let it run. 
You'll have no starter or generator 
trouble. You'll have no expensive repairs 
to make. You'll get years of service. 
For it isn't the running, but the punish- 
ing vibration of the road that makes your 
upkeep high. 

And it js this unceasing road vibration 
that Gruss Air Springs absorb. 
Figure what road vibration costs you. 
Then figure how much cheaper it would 
be to install Gruss Air Springs. 



GRUSS AIR SPRING COMPANY 

865 Post St. 
San Francisco, Calif. 




zi 




rzf 






January 20, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




FILM FLICKS 



RONDEAU 

It isn't fair, to me, when you're away. 

In vain the clouds their brightest hues display, 
Sweet summer dons in vain her gladdest guise- 
The vision falls but coldly on my eyes; 

The sky seems draped in melancholy gray. 

Though never bloomed the roses half so gay. 
Though never half so radiant shone the day. 
This loveliness my stubborn heart denies; 
It isn't fair. 

And do you, also, sing a minor lay? 

Do you to bitter yearnings fall a prey? 
"Well, no," frank Echo honestly replies, 
"In fact, it is distinctly otherwise." 

And that, my dear, is why again I say 
It isn't fair. 



— D. P. 



(From Life) 



RAINY NIGHT IN A TAXICAB 

Slipping down the avenue 

On a nighf of wind and rain, 

Velvet darkness, dancing lights. 
Raindrops on the windowpane. 

Sheen of pearl and amethyst 
Floating mist like silver lace, 

Little figures gray and dim. 
Now and then a woman's face. 

In the car a stealing warmth, 

In your hand your heart's strong beat 
As you go, now fast, now slow, 

Down the wet and gleaming street. 

Somewhere sorrow waits for us. 

Some day Love may wing his flight; 

What care we for Azracl! 

Life and Love are ours — tonight! 

Beauty is our avatar. 

Gay adventuring our role. 
All the world our splendid stage. 

Happiness our captured goal! 

Slipping down the avenue 

In our swift and silent flight. 
Hidden from the world are we, 

^ el tin world is ,.ni - tonight! 

— Elizabeth Newport Hepburn. 

(From Ainslee's) 



BY AGNES KERR CRAWFORD 

Jackie Coogan, highest paid child star of the silver screen, with 

his mother, came to San Francisco Monday for a short stay. They 

are guests of Jackie's grandmother, as the family, being sensible 

folks, feel that home life rather than a hotel is much better and 

happier for a little boy, even if he is a star. 
* * * 

Last Thursday, on the S. S. Equadore, a most interesting and 
unusual picture-making expedition started for South America. It 
consisted of fourteen men, and was equipped and sent by the North- 
ern California Photoplay Corporation, with general offices in the 
Phelan building. They expect to explore in South American terri- 
tory much of which no white man has ever seen, and to take scenic 
and educational pictures of the country, native tribes, beasts, birds 
and reptiles and they will also capture wild animals to be sent north 
to zoos. Jerry Bolton, formerly of the Francis Lord studios in Los 
Angeles, is at the head of the party, and J. J. Don Q., noted curator 
of reptiles, formerly of the Selig zoo, will act as guide. Chariot 
Molina, matador from Spain, is also of the party, and will aid in 
staging bull fights to be made into pictures in several of the im- 
portant cities of South America. 



IN MEMORIUM 
Passing of Two Veteran Writers 

James A. Carey, satirist and poet, and Edwin H. Clough, news- 
paper writer, have passed on within the last week. 

The former was for thirty years editor and publisher of the Ad- 
juster, an insurance journal of this city, and author of "The Idylls 
of the North." For several years he was associated with the San 
Francisco News Letter as the writer of the Town Crier department, 
and his many friends and literary associates mourn his passing. 
Carey was born in Maine. 

Edwin H. Clough for nearly forty years had written for various 
Pacific Coast papers. Since 1912 he had been associated with the 
San Diego Union and Evening Tribune, in an editorial capacity. 
Clough worked on the Chronicle, and later on the Call, and the 
Examiner. He was also associated with the San Francisco News 
Letter and was for many years a close friend of the publisher's 
boyhood days. 

So pass two old-time writers. 
Passing of Percy Neymann 

Percy Neymann, art photographer of exceptional merit, who has 
contributed to the San Francisco News Letter in its Christmas issues, 
died suddenly within the last few days, and has requested in his 
will that his ashes be scattered on the bay. 
Auto Salesman Dies Suddenly 

James R. Ryall. well known in automobile and club circles, died 
suddenly in his room at the St. Francis hotel, evidently from heart 
trouble. Ryall served during the war as a captain in the army, and 
was a member of the Olympic Club. He was thirty-five years old, 
very popular and leaves scores of friends who will miss him. 
John N. Luning Passes 

John N. Luning, son of the late Nicholas Luning, and brother 
of Mrs. George S. Fife. Mrs. George Whittell. Mrs. J. A. Folger and 
Oscar T. Luning. passed away in New York City on January 13. 
1923. 

Death of Frank J. Gedge 

Frank J. Gedge passed away in this city on January 13. 1923. 
leaving his wife. Isabella M Gedge. his son. Dr. H. Edward Gedge. 
three brother-. Harry P.. William K. and Dr. Donald M. C. Gedge. 
and two sisters. Mrs. Andrew Fuller and Mrs. George McReynolds, 
besides a host of friends to mourn his passing. 



10 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

'wl«sISISSSiSfi'aISS?IISlS.lir:"ISiSiSIg«SISlSgISa 8 a a .a gag's aa "g g a a a a a a a a aggag agagg;* 



January 20, 1923 




The Wonder City 



^p 



@ 

m 
::.:K?j:5j_jj«! S.SSiSSiJ! a a :: :: a a a a a a a a a a a .: a aaaaa a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a ia 

BY HAMILTON PEABODY 



THOSE who boast of their home place, the city where they 
live, are to be excused on the plea that any such boast is al- 
most always a commendable expression of patriotism. We can ac- 
custom ourselves to the idea of seeing loveliness in that which is 
unlovely and we can very easily make ourselves feel that, accord- 
ing to the standard we have imagined for ourselves, the worst is 
sometimes like the best. 

California has been heralded to the world at large as being that 
"land of perfect climate." When one considers how California has 



In the north of California we have San Francisco and what has 
come to be known as the "bay country." This section of the state 
of California has a climate which does not have its counter-part in 
any portion of the world. It is neither too hot nor too cold. It 
has its long season of sunshine and it has its winter supply of rain. 
It is a climate to which the new-comer must become acquainted and 
take the time in which to do so. It takes some time to get used to, and 
when you do get used to it you are so infatuated with it that you 
will never find real comfortable ease anywhere else on earth. It is 




ft 






■V .. 







7a i 1 1 ■•<•' iiitTi j " 












Picturesque Scenes Around the Water Front, and in San Francisco's Chinatown 



been gifted with climates of all kinds and varieties it is a puzzle how 
that kind of an idea as to perfection came to be so generally be- 
lieved at home and abroad. We have in California every climate of 
the world except the extremely humid variety. We have stupen- 
dous snow falls and we have regions with a climate which is almost 
a counter-part of that of Minnesota. We have the climate of the 
dry desert, lands in which the rainfall, except in cloud bursts, is 
almost a negligible quantity. We have hot climates, too; we have 
the southland, where the sun shines nearly all of the time, and 
where any one critically inclined may find the heat sometimes too 
much to bear. 



never too hot anywhere in this "bay country" and it is rarely too 
cold. In the shade it is chilly for the new-comer, but everywhere 
and under any conditions it is exhilarating and each day it brings 
to the resident a feeling of invigoration with which to meet the battle 
of life. 

And right in the midst of this wonderful climate we have the 
wonder city — San Francisco. San Francisco could not be elsewhere 
and the spirit of San Francisco could exist nowhere else. Here is 
a city rebuilt by its people after it had been devastated as no city 
ever was. Here is a city which has withstood every sort of attack 
politically and which has risen to give evidence that it is one of the 



January 20. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 



best governed in this country. San Francisco is the great money 
mart of this American Pacific Coast. It is the great port of the 
Balboan seas and none other than Hongkong may compare with 
it in that regard. It is becoming, together with Oakland and all of 
the bay cities, an industrial center of great importance. 

From the standpoint of the picturesque and the artistic it has 
more to show than may be offered by any other large city on the 
coast. Its water views are majestic, its beach is unrivalled, its 
parks are some of the most beautiful in the land, its hills line the 
city about, and, over in Marin county, San Francisco has its own 
mountain — Tamalpais. It has near at hand magnificent forests of 
Sequoyas and its natural attractions in every other way surpass 
those of other localities. 

Its street car system is perfect and the means of communica- 
tion by rail and boat with the world at large are unrivalled. It 
is truly the "wonder city" — it is wonderful because it is what it 
is when one considers what it has had to go through, and it seems 
that it could not be what it is except that it is the capital of 
wonderland — California. 

The question now arises is whether this is boasting or whether 
the boasting is justified by the facts? There is but one way to 
find out if this article is true or not true, and that is by coming 
here to live with us a while, to look about you and to feel the 
fraternity feeling and the wealth of welcome that will be given you. 

To particularize it would be necessary to fill a volume with de- 
scriptions of the various attractive and picturesque features of the 
city by the Golden Gate and its environs. San Francisco has always 
had the greatest number of clubs and societies of all kinds. San 
Francisco bay, and the cities and hamlets lining its shores, offers 
a chance for excursions that will give the greatest pleasure; and 
to realize the beauty and the charm of this bay region a drive 



should be taken through the Presidio of San Francisco, past the 
Cliff House and Sutro Heights, and along the Ocean boulevard. 
The Cliff House is an historical landmark that has had to be re- 
newed three times in as many generations; Golden Gate Park, a 
reclaimed waste spot, reclaimed to such an extent that it is one 
of the most magnificent of all the parks of the world in point of 
size and in point of beauty. It comprises 1013 acres and it is a 
magnificent tribute to the minds of those who so steadfastly carried 
out their plans. 

For more than 1 30 years the old Mission Dolores has stood as 
one of the oldest buildings in San Francisco and for all of that 
time services have been held within its walls. This mission has been 
splendidly preserved and its interior is practically just as it was when 
completed so many years ago. 

Chinatown is a gorgeous dream which has been transformed into 
an actuality. The usual squalor and dirt is missing and instead the 
beauty and the color of China is found here. It is a fascinating 
city in itself, comprising twelve blocks square. 

The two peaks, properly named Twin Peaks, which overlook 
the city, and which attain a height of 900 feet, afford a daylight 
and nighttime view of the big city that cannot be compared to the 
view of any city anywhere. This is especially true if the city is 
viewed from the peaks on a dark and starry night and the myriads 
of electric lights are seen ablaze below denoting the streets and 
the great centers of activity. 

The De Young Museum in Golden Gate Park is well worth de- 
voting a great deal of time to visit. 

The Palace of Fine Arts is well worth the visit of anyone. Noth- 
ing finer as to conception artistically is to be found in San Francisco. 
It is only to be regretted that this structure and the surroundings 
were not so designed with material to endure all time. 



VISIT 

"The 
Catacombs" 

AT 

CYPRESS LAWN 
CEMETERY 

City Office: 

995 Market St. 

San Francisco 



PHONES: 



SUTTER 695 
DOUGLAS 4772 



TYPEWRITERS 

tiiutranteed Factory Kelt ul 11 

All Makes ■&»"» 

See the New Remington Portable 
The Standard Keyboard Portable 

Paper — Ribbons — Carbon — Supplies 
AMERICAN WRITING MACHINE CO. 

BOO Mark«1 M , Vin Kruti. Phunr Dour. 649 
SOB 1 .'Hi Bt., Onklnn.1 I'll. .1... Oakland |?M 



St Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the' Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



For particulars addresa 

SISTER SUPERIOR 



— ANNUAL MEETING — 
THK JOSHUA BENDY IKON WORKS 

The regular annual meeting of the stock- 
holders of Tlio .Toshua Hendy Iron Works 
will he held at the office of the Corpora- 
tion. No 75 Fremont Street. San Fran- 
cisco. California, on Tuesday, the 13th day 
of February. 1923, at the hour of 10 
o'clock a. ni . for the purpose of electing 
a Board of Directors to serve for the en- 
sulng year, and the transaction of such 
other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

CHAS C. GARDNER. Secretary 

Office. 75 Fremont Street, San Francisco. 

Cat. 



Cafe Marquard 

GEARY AND MASON* STREETS 
Telephone Prospect 61 

VUilom In San Francisco Orlicht In the 
Gar Bohemian Almonplifrf, the Enter- 
tainment and Dancing, the Rare Quality 
of Food and Courteous Service 



IINTHEON 

Continental Style 

Twenty-six Delicious Dishes. Prepared 

and Served So Differently 



DIN Nl K 



Every Evening — Six to Nine 
Also Select a la Carte 



Dancing and Cabaret 



INVENTIONS COMMERCIALIZED 

ntfd or un- 
Pomplete f;< What have 

ADAM FISHER MM.. CO. 



..in- 



Mo 



ECZEMA 

IS ONLY SKIN DEEP 



and can be Instantly relieved and quickly 
heated by the use of CRANOLENE. the suc- 
cessful cranberry cream treatment for stub- 
born akin troubles. At drug stores, 35c and 
11.00. or writ* for Free Test Treatment to 
0%noJM»eComp»u>y, Pep*. ? _Girard J _K*a— 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 20, 1923 




ociot 




BUSY (l I'll) 

TROWBRIDGE-KIRK — Invitations are out for the wedding of 
Miss Miriam Trowbridge, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Christopher Trowbridge, and Mrs. .1. Paul Kirk of Los An- 
geles. The nuptials will be solemnized at St. Luke's Church 
in Van Ness avenue, at 8:30 o'clock on the evening of Wed- 
nesday February 7. Following the ceremony a reception will 
be held at the Bohemian Club, when the guests will include 
the immediate relatives of both families and a very few very 
intimate friends. Miss Trowbridge has chosen her sister. Miss 
Edith Trowbridge, as her maid of honor, and the bridesmaids 
will be: Miss Katherine Stoney, Miss Marie Louise Meyer, 
Miss Azalene Eaton, Miss Barbara Sesnon, Miss Agnes Weston, 
and Miss Annette Rolph. Mr. Ralph Cromwell will act as 
the groom's best man, and the ushers will be: Mr. Charles 
Christopher Trowbridge Jr., a brother of the bride; Mr. James 
H. Brassett. Mr. Frederick W. Mahl Jr., Mr. Albert F. Craw, 
Mr. George N. Nash Jr. and Mr. John Earle Jardine Jr., the 
latter five being fraternity brothers of the groom. 

Bl'CKBEE — Miss Margaret Buckee has changed the date of her 
marriage from April 4. which was the original date set, to 
April 2. The wedding will be held at St. Luke's Episcopal 
Church in Van Ness avenue, and will be followed by a re- 
ception at the home of the bride in Pacific avenue. Further 
details of the wedding have not yet been decided on, but 
there will be a number of bridal attendants, and the event 
will be one of the brilliant affairs of the after-Lenten season. 

PORTER — Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Porter (Frances Lent), whose 
marriage was an event of last week, are spending their 
honeymoon in the southern part of the state. They left Santa 
Barbara, where they passed the early part of their honey- 
moon at the Hotel Samarkand, and are motoring to Los 
Angeles. From that city there is a possibility that they will 
go on to Coronado, and on their way north will again stop at 
Santa Barbara. 

WORMSER-LIEBES — An interesting little home wedding sol- 
emnized Sunday was that of Miss Edith Wormser, daughter 
of Mrs. May Wormser, and Mr. George Julien Liebes, son 
of Mrs. Julien Liebes. The wedding took place at the home 
of the bride's cousin, Mrs. Sidney Herzog, 1919 Octavia street, 
at 3 o'clock. The young couple have gone south for their 
honeymoon and will be away for two weeks. On their return 
they will live at the Hotel Fielding. 

NUGENT-STOW — Announcement is made of the engagement of 
Miss Virginia Nugent, daughter of Baroness Alice Younger 
Nugent and the late Baron La Val Nugent de Delvin of 
Hungary, to Ashfield Ellis Stow, son of Mrs. Vanderlynn 
Stow and the late Vanderlynn Stow of the this city. The 
bride-elect, who is a granddaughter of Mrs. William J. 
Younger and the late Dr. William J. Younger of San Fran- 
cisco and of Paris, received her education in Europe. She 
is a niece of Miss Maud Younger, Mrs. Burns Macdonald 
and of Dr. Edward J. Y'ounger. Miss Nugent's father, the late 
Baron de Delvin, is a direct descendant of the Earl of West- 
meath of England. Baroness Nugent plans to make her per- 
manent home in California. With her sister, Mrs. Burns 
Macdonald, she has just taken possession of a house on Scott 
street, which they bought recently. Her grandmother, Mrs. 
W. J. Y'ounger, will return from Paris for the wedding. Miss 
Nugent's fiance is well known in law and club circles in San 
Francisco. He is a member of the Pacific Union and Univers- 
ity Clubs of San Francisco. 

D1LLINGHAM-SQUIRE — Formal announcement is made of the 
engagement of Mrs. Julia Dillingham and Mr. George Francis 
Squire, formerly of New Y'ork but now residing in this city. 
The wedding will take place in the spring. Mrs. Dillingham 
is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Dillingham and a 
sister of Mr. Matthew Dillingham. Her father was for many 
years in the American consular service and was consul in 
several European countries, and her grandfather, the late 
Mr. Paul Dillingham, was for Iwo terms governor of Ver- 
mont. On her mother's side she is a granddaughter of the 
late Mr. and Mis. Richard George Sneath. Mr. Squire is a 
cousin of Mr. Frederick Hope Beaver, Mrs. John dishing, 
Mrs. Horace Van Sicklin and Mrs. Victor Cooley. He has 
lived in San Francisco for nine years. 



WARREN-GILLESPIE — The marriage of Mrs. Claudine Cotton 
Warren and Mr. Alfred E. Gillespie was solemnized Tues- 
day evening in the Swedenborgian Church in Lyon street. 
Rev. Van Nuys officiating. The ceremony was followed by 
an informal supper at the home of the bride. Mrs. Warren 
was given in marriage by her brother, Mr. Aylett R. Cotton. 
Mrs. Alice Sallee Ellinwood attended her as matron of honor. 
Miss Claudine Warren and Miss Sallee Ellinwood were the 
flower girls. Mr. Sidney Hauptman was best man. Mr. and 
Mrs. Gillespie went south on their honeymoon and on their 
return they will make their home in Mr. Gillespie's residence 
in Green street. 

LUNCHEONS 
ROOS — Madam A. Roos gave an elaborate luncheon in the Red 
room at the Fairmont Monday and entertained a party of 
forty friends. 
TAYLOR — Complimenting Miss Lillian Hopkins, who will be a 
bride of the month. Miss Edna Taylor gave a luncheon Tues- 
day afternoon at her home at Pierce and Vallejo streets. Her 
guests included Miss Hopkins, Miss Josephine Grant, Miss 
Edith Grant, Miss Alice Retina, Miss Jane Carrigan, Miss 
Mary Julia Crocker, Miss Aileen Mcintosh, Miss Lawton Filer, 
Miss Eleanor Spreckels and Miss Helene de Latour . 
HOWARD — In honor of Miss Lillian Hopkins and Edwards Bates 
Pond, who are to be married on Saturday, January 27. Mr. 
and Mrs. George H. Howard gave a handsome luncheon at 
the Burlingame Country Club Monday afternoon. Henry How- 
ard, son of the hosts, is to be best man at the wedding. 
GIBBONS — In honor of Miss Kate Boardman, who with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. T. Danforth Boardman, is leaving Febru- 
ary 1 for Europe, Miss Beulah Gibbons, daughter of Dr. and 
Mrs. Morton H. Gibbons, gave a luncheon at the Women's 
Athletic Club on Saturday afternoon. 
I1AYNE — Mrs. Richard Bayne entertained a few intimate friends 

at luncheon at her home in Jordan Park last Friday. 
XORRIS — In honor of Miss Jeanette Norris, the charming young 
daughter of Mrs. Frank Preston of Medford, Ore., and the 
late Frank Norris. novelist. Mrs. Charles Gilman Norris en- 
tertained at a luncheon Monday at the Hotel St. Francis. 
Miss Norris recently arrived from her home in the north to 
spend the remainder of the winter in San Francisco as the 
guest oi her uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Norris. 
FRANKLIN-HALL — One of the most delightful and interesting 
events of this week was the bridge and Mah Jongg party 
at which Mrs. Walter Scott Franklin and Mrs. James Lowe 
Hall entertained on Wednesday at the Francisca Club. There 
were three tables of each and preceding the games the group 
of friends accepted the hospitality of the hostesses at lunch- 
eon. 

TF.AS 
ROBBINS — Mrs. Milo Robbins entertained at an informal tea 
Tuesday afternoon at her home. A score of guests accepted 
her hospitality. 
KEESLING — Miss Jacqueline Keesling. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Francis V. Keesling. entertained at tea at her home in Pre- 
sidio Terrace on Saturday afternoon, having as her guests 
several score of her schoolgirl friends, many of whom will 
be numbered among next year's debutantes. Mrs. Keesling 
received with her daughter. Those assisting at tea were: 
.Misses Dorothy Clark, Katherine Chace. Dorothy Meyer, Flor- 
ence Hellman, Beatrice Horst, Isabelle Bishop, Elizabeth Doz- 
ier, Dorcas Jackson, Florence Bostwick. 




Under the guidance of R. IF. Collins ami his as- 
sociates, the Peerless was bound to he a hetter 
and better Peerless. The public response came 
quickly and is indicated by augmented sales in old 
Peerless strongholds and throughout the country 
in general. 

Pioneer Motor Company 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

1900 Van Ness Ave., Corner Washington St. 
Telephone Prospect 8800 



January 20. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



BRADLEY — Mrs. Frederick W. Bradley entertained at a tea at 
her home on Pacific avenue on Saturday afternoon fop her 
mother, Mrs. Mary P. Park, and her mother-in-law, Mrs. 
Virginia S. Bradley. Saturday's affair was given also to wel- 
come Philip Bradley, a brother of Frederick W. Bradley, 
who is being greeted upon his return from Alaska after a 
long absence. 

SCOTT — The laurel court of the Fairmont Hotel was the scene 
of an enjoyable tea given on Saturday afternoon by Mrs. 
A. W. Scott in honor of Mrs. George Douglas, a recent bride, 
who will leave in a few days for Shanghai, China, where she 
will join her husband, who was obliged to leave for the Orient 
very shortly after the marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Douglas will 
make their home in Shanghai. 

BERNHEIM — In honor of Mrs. Terry P. Bull, who left on Sun- 
day with Major Bull for his new station at EI Paso, Tex., 
Mrs. Julien R. Bernheim entertained at a bridge tea last 
week. 

DINNERS 

THORNE — Mr. and Mrs. Julian Thorne entertained at a dinner 
at their home on Friday evening and later with their guests 
they attended the Quatres Arts ball at the Hotel Fairmont. 

AMES — Miss Frances Ames entertained informally at dinner 
Tuesday evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Scott 
in Divisadero street. Miss Hopkins and Mr. Edward Pond 
were the guests of honor. 

KAHN — Mrs. Ira Kahn was a dinner hostess at the Fairmont 
on Sunday evening and entertained a party of twelve friends. 

KOSHLAND — Elaborate in detail and original in conception was 
the dinner given on Saturday evening by Mr. and Mrs. Mar- 
cus Koshland at their residence in Washington street. The 
ballroom in which the 100 guests were entertained was ar- 
ranged to appear a miniature replica of the Columbia theater. 
Even the decorations carried out the theater effect and were 
garlands of fruits and ivy. During the entire dinner a clever 
coterie of guests took part in an original vaudeville and 
kept up a running bristling, intimate patter aimed at the 
hosts and guests. There were tableaux depicting the fad 
dreams and hopes of those present and a specially made 
moving picture entitled "One Day," which represented the 
usual routine of one of the host's days, who, by the way, 
was celebrating his birthday. After dinner the guests played 
Mali .longg or bridge as their fancy dictated. 

HOPKINS — In honor of Miss Lillian Hopkins and her fiance, 
Mr. Edward Pond, whose marriage will be an event of the 
latter part of this month, Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. Hopkins 
entertained at a dinner Monday evening at their home in 
California street, later attending the theater with their guests. 
Those who enjoyed their hospitality included: Miss Hopkins, 
Mr. and Mrs. William Gregory Parrott, Miss Edna Taylor, 
Miss Helene de Latour, Mr. Edward Pond, Mr. Cyril McNear, 
and Mr. Paul Kennedy. 

STERN — Mrs. Hattie Stern gave a very delightful little dinner 
Friday evening at the Hotel Richelieu and entertained a 
party of ten friends. 

BAZET — Dr. and Mrs. Louis Bazet had some of their friends in 
for dinner on Monday evening at their home to meet Mme. 
Calve, the noted French singer, who is visiting here on her 
concert tour. 

ODDIE — Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Oddle entertained at a dinner 
Wednesday evening at their home. The affair marked the 
anniversary of their marriage and it was enjoyed by a group 
of their closer friends, several of whom were present at tin- 
wedding of the former Miss Alice Treanor and Mr. Oddie 
many years ago. 

SPRECKELS — Miss Eleanor Sprockets will give a dinner Janu- 
ary 27 at her home in Pacific avenue. Later in the evening 
the hostess and her guests will attend the "baby'' parly which 
Mr. and Mrs. George Cameron and Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Oliver 
Tobin will give at the De Young home in California street for 
Miss Frances Ames and Miss Josephine Drown. 

MOFFITT- Dr. and Mrs. Herbert Moffltl have issued cards to 
a dinner dance which they will give al their home in Broad- 
way January -I. The debutantes of the last two seasons and 
their eseorls will be invited. 

FLEISCHER — Sunday evening Mr, and Mrs. Benjamin Fleischer 
entertained ten friends at dinner at the Hotel Richelieu. 



MORRIS — Mrs, Oregon E. Morris entertained a group of friends 
at dinner in her apartments at the Hotel Cecil recently, hav- 
ing as her guests of honor Mrs. Ella Pierce Breyfogle and her 
niece. Mrs. Raymond Russ. The other guests were Mr. and 
Mrs. John V. Rounsefell, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Rulofson and 
Mr. and Mrs. Hiram K. Defendorf. 

DANCES 

BACHELORS BALL — The bachelors of San Francisco are ar- 
ranging to hold a ball at the San Francisco Golf and Country 
Club at Ingleside on the evening of February 9, in com- 
pliment to the debutantes of this season and the young girls 
who have included them in their parties throughout the win- 
ter. 

MARDI GRAS — Approximately the same coterie of women who 
in the past years have managed the destinies of the annual 
Mardi Gras ball will give a fancy dress dance at the Burlin- 
game Country Club on Shrove Tuesday, February 13. The 
decision to abandon the annual Mardi Gras ball, which for 
fifteen years has been given for the Children's hospital, cre- 
ated so much disappointment that it was decided to give a 
Mardi Gras ball anyway. For 192 4 the Civic auditorium has 
been leased for Shrove Tuesday evening, for it is felt that 
probably by that time events will have changed to make 
such a ball a part of the city's social program again. 
INTIMATIONS 

KELLY — Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Kelly are expected in San Fran- 
cisco for a few days' visit following their tour of the south. 
They will be guests of the bride's mother, Mrs. William 
Sproule. 

BARRON — Mrs. Edward Barron has returned to her home in 
San Mateo from San Francisco, where she has been at the 
Dante Sanatorium for several weeks. Miss Evelyn Barron, 
who was at the Hotel Fairmont during her mother's illness, 
is also home again. 

d'AUDIFFRET — Countess d'Audiffret of Paris, who has been so- 
journing in San Francisco for some time and is making her 
home at the Fairmont hotel, is taking a ten days' rest cure 
at the French hospital. 

CROCKER — Mrs. William H. Crocker and her daughter. Miss 
Ethel Crocker, will leave toward the last of this month for 
New York, and after visiting there, plan to go abroad for 
the spring and summer months. 

REDINGTON — Miss Sarah Redington will arrive from Santa 
Barbara this week for a brief visit in San Francisco. She 
will be entertained at the William Redington home on Scott 
street, as well as at the home of her brother and sister-in- 
law. Mr and Mrs. Arthur Redington. in San Mateo. 

WELCH — Mr. Raymond Welch will return shortly from a visit 
in the northwest, where he went last week. 

HUFF — Lieutenant Commander and Mrs Karle P. Huff, whose 
marriage was an event of the midwinter in New York, have 
gone to Boston to reside They will be joined early in the 
summer by Mrs Huff's daughter. Miss Azalea Adelaide 
Kierulff. who is in school in Berkeley 

MILLER — Mr and Mrs Robert Miller are receiving the con- 
gratulations of their friends on the birth of a little son. which 
occurred Tuesday. The young mother was formerly Miss 
Elizabeth Folger. the elder daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest 
Folger. 

POLO 

SAX MATEo — The Del Monte polo ponies will arrive in San 
Mateo Tuesday morning for the San Mateo-Del Monte polo 
tournament at the San Mateo field over the week end. There 
are to be games on Friday afternoon as well as on Sunday 
afternoon of next week, and the teams are leaving on Wed- 
nesday of the following week for Southern California to play 
in l.os Angeles and in Pasadena with the Midwick and Pasa- 
dena polo teams. 

OKI. MONTE 

HOLLINS- Miss Marion Hollins of New York paid a visit to 
Pebble Beach last week. She spent much time in company 
with Mr and Mrs William (' Van Antwerp and Mrs. Charles 
W Clark Miss Hollins is perhaps one of the best known 
sportswomen in America She was a former national woman's 
golf champion and is a polo player of ability. 

MHOON — Mrs Frank Hall Mhoon and Mrs. Frederick Magee 
of Piedmont are among visitors now at Del Monte. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 

\r-s \vr„ h! t.rHl-v Street 9AS PKAX CISCO 

the most refined family h.>ti>i in the city 
— a home unsurpae 
I i MSB M. WOODB1 H\ .unftirr 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

Ml Crocker Building 

Telephone Suiter <■>• tnrier Management CARL S STANLEY 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 20, 1923 





LF1NANCIAU 




By P. N. 

I T IS an astonishing fact that while those 
X who would like to see the utmost leniency 
extended the Germans in the matter of the 
reparations payments are crying out the 
French actions, in the so-called German in- 
vasion, will hurt world business, the ex- 
changes and bourses of the world have been 
but slightly affected and in fact in most cases 
after a slight recession the slow advance 
which was being maintained has been kept 
up. New York last week had a somewhat 
phenomenal stock and bond sale and prices 
of commodities, instead of falling off are on 
the rise. There is no rapid advance and noth- 
ing .very hectic in the upward movement, 
but all of the conditions are healthy ones. 



The Hungarian Rumpus 

The rumpus in Hungary between that 
country and Roumania is on a par with the 
trouble between France, Belgium and Italy 
and Germany. It is simply an echo of the 
German pot-pourri. Memel is another at- 
tempt to befog the general issue and to keep 
the allies busy with as many troops and 
warships as possible to keep the peace. Tur- 
key is standing on the brink of serious trou- 
ble with Great Britain and eventually with 
the other allies. 



BERINGER 

to do so will benefit San Francisco and today, 
as far as the metropolis and the northern end 
of the state is concerned, we are bottled up 
and effectually cut off from doing business 
along the lines of the least resistance. Be- 
cause of this the new ferry line has been 
doing an enormous business and the bridge 
will in the future assist everyone in doing a 
still greater amount of trade with the upper 
state section. The two towers, upholding the 
cantilever sections of the bridge, will be 
taller than the celebrated Eiffel Tower at 
Paris. The bridge will be the largest struc- 
ture of the kind in the world. The middle 
section will be a suspension bridge, swung 
from the ends of the cantilever sections. 
There will be street car tracks over the mid< 
die roadway and one way automobile streets 
on either side, and these in turn are to be 
flanked by a foot bridge. 



Europe and Asia 

The situation in Europe and in Asia is 
steadily improving, despite the invasions and 
near-revolutions. Time will show that the 
French appreciation of the situation is the 
correct one and that the action by France 
in bringing an intolerable situation to a head 
may eventually mean the salvation of every- 
one concerned. This is particularly true of 
the German common classes, who have been 
used as pawns in a great game by those 
who are behind the big commercial and in- 
dustrial interests of the German nation. Of 
course all of these national distempers have 
their economic effect, beneficial and detri- 
mental. 



The Golden Gate Bridge 

Few of the people of this great city com- 
paratively and of the country, in the north- 
ern part of California, realize what a won- 
derful project is the Golden Gate bridge 
and what vast benefits will accrue to the 
city and that northern section through this 
construction. Perhaps, it is of value to state 
the country to the north of us is not nearly 
as well known as the country to the south 
and that, in point of fact, it is much more 
valuable to San Francisco because it is es- 
sentially tributary to this city in every way, 
Whatever will develop this territory or help 



A Warm Enthusiasm 

A warm enthusiasm pervades the whole 
of the northern section of the state as to 
the construction of the bridge and a meet- 
ing held Saturday at Santa Rosa testified 
to the unanimity with which the people have 
responded in interest in the project. Nearly 
300 representative men met and voiced their 
sentiments and all were favorable. The re- 
sult of this meeting was a resolution to adopt 
a slogan of "get busy." When the bridge is 
built it will be the biggest advertisement ever 
devised for San Francisco and Northern Cali- 
fornia. 



Bank Business 

Bank business is in a healthv condition 
in San Francisco and the banks are, for 
the most part, doing a much better business 
than at the same period of 1922. The be- 
ginning of that year showed the effects of 
having left the previous year behind as a 
very gloomy one indeed. No such feeling 
exists today. The banks have been able to 
carry on the business of the city and the 
state without having to have recourse to 
the Federal Reserve bank. 



The Building Operations 

The building operations increasingly mani- 
fest themselves on both sides of the bay and 
northward in Marin, and other nearby coun- 
ties. Real estate operations are, of course, 
in a much healthier condition than they have 
been for months and there is a movement in 
realtor circles in every direction. Numerous 
transactions, in which large value holdings 
in San Francisco prop-rty have been the 
case, show how confident a feeling exists 
among investors. 



A Million Dollar Home 

A million dollar home is projected for the 
Elks on the north side of Post street, be- 
tween Powell and Mason. One and a quar- 
ter million dollars is reported as having been 
spent in St. Francis' Wood in 1922; the 
new seven-story building of the Spring Val- 
ley Water Company, on the west side of 
Mason street, now under construction, will 
soon be finished; the big building of the 
Matson Navigation Company on lower Mar- 
ket street is neanng completion, while op- 
erations are begun to complete the block, 
with the big structure which is to house the 
headquarters of the P. G. and E. Sales of 
property are reported in every direction. The 
United States Lines has leased the building 
on the southeast corner of Montgomery and 
Pine streets, and the entire structure is being 
remodelled. These few items are mentioned 
to show the marked activity in realty and 
sales circles in the last few days. And out- 
side property, farm lands, is not inactive 
and large transactions and small ones have 
been the order of the day. California and 
San Francisco is ready for a big year in 
1923. 



New Car Line 

A new extension of the Municipal line 
was opened to the public this week with 
appropriate ceremonies. If the Municipal line 
was placed in a position where it could im- 
mediately acquire the Market Street system, 
many new extensions would be made. The 
new line will cater to a fast growing sec- 
tion of the city and the meeting at Thirty- 
fourth and Taraval streets showed great en- 
thusiasm at the ceremony. 



A Legislative Production 

From the news coming to this city from 
Sacramento, it seems there is to be a veritable 
record output of new laws. There is to be 
a revision of the motor law and the wets 
and the drys are sure to have innings, but 
apart from these two great questions, the 
rtatesmen are ready each of them with a 
Det bill. 



The Brotherhoods 

The rail brotherhoods are busy at this 
time with their legal advsors trying to frame 
new laws to present in Congress with a view 
cf hampering the railroad corporations in 
the running of their lines. It is too bad that 
these over-restricted corporations should once 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 



COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 



Send for Our MurkM Letter, Just Out 



370 BllHll Street 
Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco. Cal. 



January 20, 1923 

again be made the victims of a legislative 
onslaught, finding its initiative in a desire for 
vengeance on the part of their employes. 
Why not let well enough alone? 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Gravel Mining in California 

Gravel mining has always been a prolific 
yielder of treasure in this state. The State 
Mining Bureau gives the data showing that 
the year 1922 was not a backward one with 
gravel miners in this state. 



The Comstock Lode 

There is much activity and there has 
been a great many purchases made of mines 
in the Comstock Lode region. 



California Oil 

California is now producing more oil than 
at any time in its entire history. There is 
a veritable oil boom on in Southern Cali- 
fornia. The people seem to have simply 
gone wild on oil in the Los Angeles dis- 
trict, and for that matter, all over the state. 
But it is in the Los Angeles district the scenes 
attendant on the oil booms of Oklahoma 
and Texas are being reproduced. And, de- 
spite the fact that oil is being produced in 
quantities that have never been approached 
before, there does not seem to be the slight- 
est effect on the price of the product. 



The Quicksilver Industry 

The Almaden mines are producing and the 
St. John, at Vallejo, will soon be reopened 
and operated. This will give employment to 
a large number of men. 

There is a movement on foot throughout 
the state to reopen all of the quicksilver 
mines. The tariff, recently imposed by Con- 
gress, has put a stop to the large shipments 
into this country of quicksilver from Itaiy 
and from Mexico. Already forty-five tons of 
the metal are being treated daily at New 
fMmaden. The mines are producing about 
250 flasks of quicksilver a month. The 
Guadelupe quicksilver mines, which are lo- 
cated but a few miles from the New Almaden, 
and which are in the hands of the estate 
of Theodore Bell, are to be opened up, it is 
said, as soon as possible. 



A Wage Bonus 

Sutro 6t Co. presented each of its em- 
ployes with a month's salary as a wage 
bonus. Investment and banking institutions 
in San Francisco gave their employes quite 
generally a bonus during the holiday week. 
Blyth, Witter & Co. gave their employes 
bonuses ranging from 10 to 25 per cent of 
their annual salaries. Cyrus Peirce & Co. 
announced a cash distribution of 10 per cent 
of the annual salary of each employe with 
a cash bonus in addition, based on length 
of service. 

Mining 

Preparations are being made to carry on 
a much greater amount of development work 
in the mines of California and Nevada than 
was ever projected in recent years. This 
year will see a much greater activity and the 
investment of large capital in all of the gold 



Few People Take Proper Care of Their Teeth 

Some think that a vignrouH brushing once 
nr twice a day In taking; very good care 
«f them. Brushing Is only a part of the 
proceHN. Many things <an happen to your 
teeth which only a competent dentist can 
take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They muy not be as sound as you Imagine. 
A toothache means trouble; do not wait 
for the uohe. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy 
teeth faster than decay. Are your teeth 
sore? I>o your gums bleed? Call In today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My 
nerve blocking system blocks off all nerves 
and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Garfield 835 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; 
Seir Cleansing Bridges; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



Enroll Now in 



COSGROVE'S SCHOOL 

of 

Hair Dressing 

and 

Beauty Culture 

A course in the above makes you in- 
dependent. See 

MR. AND MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Kearny 2842 



Mayerle's 




Expert Optical Service and 

Scientific Eye Examinations 

960 Market Street 

29 Years in San Francisco 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



15 



and silver mines of both the big mineral 
producing states. Tonopah and Goldfield and 
the mines of Northern California will see 
the influx of a very healthy flow of new capi- 
tal. The last year has not been an unprofit- 
able one in the mining business but much 
more might have been accomplished had 
there been a more enthusiastic participation 
by men of money. This, under the circum- 
stances, was perhaps not to be expected. At 
any rate, with legislation which will make 
the lot of the miner easier and with a greater 
willingness on the man of means to engage 
in mining, much will be done in 1923. 



RAILWAY EXPENDITURE 

That the railways of the United States, if 
financial and other conditions are favorable, 
will make larger expenditures for equipment 
and improvements in 1923 than for several 
years, is shown by information published in 
the annual statical number of the Railway 
Age this week. Twenty-seven railways with 
an aggregate mileage of about 95,000 miles 
have given to the Railway Age details of 
plans for 1923, providing for expenditures 
for equipment and improvements that will 
amount to over $350,000,000. These rail- 
ways have less than 40 per cent of the mile- 
age of the country, and their officers indicate 
that they will make even larger capital ex- 
penditures than those now definitely planned 
if conditions are favorable. 

"It may be assumed that an equal amount 
will be spent by railways having the rest 
of the mileage of the country," says the 
Railway Age, "the total expenditure for 
equipment and improvements will exceed 
$700,000,000. The significance of this is in- 
dicated by the fact that in only one year 
(1917) during the last ten have the records 
of the Interstate Commerce Commission 
shown an investment in road and equipment 
exceeding $700,000,000. while the average 
annual investment during this period has 
been less than $500,000,000. The money ap- 
prcpriated will go for new lines, for second 
track, for new yards and terminals, for 
freight and passenger stations, for equip- 
ment, for signaling for locomotives and cars, 
and for other facilities which make up rail- 
way property." 



Rich Dad — My son is a writer. 

Friend — You mean he writes for money? 

Rich Dad (grimly) — Exactly. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



8>an iFrattrtBrn (Eltrnmrl? 



Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 

A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for SI. 15 a month — 

Including Sunday editions 

Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 20, 1923 




PLyEASURE/S WAND 



"Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




Tellegen at the Orpheum 

"Blind Youth," the playlet in which Lou 
Tellegen appears during the current engage- 
ment in San Francisco, is a highly con- 
densed version of his three-act drama, hav- 
ing been reduced in size by the actor him- 
self, and being now perfectly adapted to 
vaudeville purposes. The revision work is 
cleveily done and much of the real essence 
of the play retained. Tellegen's celebrated 
good looks are still his drawing card; his 
acting is acceptable. It is an interesting per- 
sonality, rich and restrained, artistic and 
spartan, passionate and pure. On the bill 
with this famous head-liner are Eddie Leon- 
ard, who continues to make us all laugh 
in "The Minstrel's Delight," and Bert Fitz- 
gibbon, the "Original Daffy Dill," receives 
his full share of applause. Howard Lang- 
ford and Ina Frederick do a very funny 
shopping act. Chester Spencer and Lola 
Williams in song and dance bits make a 
favorable impression. The Misses Miller ex- 
cel in their line, also musical and terpsi- 
chorean. A clever chap with cards is Allan 
Shaw; he also displays astonishing dexter- 
ity in the matter of disappearing and reap- 
pearing coins. 



Columbia 

The revival of "The Merry Widow" seems 
to have struck a popular chord, and every 
one yearns to hear once more the melodies 
that fill the score of this most tuneful of 
light operas. Apparently they have never 
been forgotten, but lying all these years in 
a remote corner of the music-memory, ready 
to pop out and set us dancing again, just 
as in the days when hair and skirts were 
longer and hats and hips were wider. Henry 
Savage has revived the classic in a praise- 
worthy manner, with pretty Marie Wells in 
the title role and James Liddy as Prince 
Danilo. The selection of Jefferson De An- 
gelis for the role .of Nish was a stroke of 
genius on Mr. Savage's part. And the Mer- 
ry Widow Waltz, with all its thrills and lures. 




MA ™ 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted in Dress Circle 
and Loges 




Lou Tellegen, an "Exotic Cosmopolite" 



very charmingly done by Fred Easter and 
Ruth Hazelton, was received with tumultuous 
enthusiasm and asked for again and again. 
A Columbia first-night is always a delight- 
ful occasion, and certain it is that the Merry 
Widow numbers among her old friends some 
of the best bachelors in this town. At least, 
I suppose they were bachelors, for they came 
in debcnnair, evening-dressed, detached and 
carefree groups that laughed and joked and 
enjoyed the show in a fashion quite un- 
hampered. 



Tivoli 

The second week of the run of "Fury" 
with Richard Barthelmess shows an increase 
of interest on the part of the public in this 
dramatic picture and the fine acting of the 
star. Barthelmess' art is of the kind that 
grows better with every part he plays. The 
improvement is not accidental, nor is it due 
to the particular picture in which he ap- 
pears; it is the development of a talent 
through conscientious care and studious at- 
tention to the higher phases of his profes- 
sion. The facial mobility of this young actor 
makes him eminently fitted for the film, and 
his temperament adapts him to the wide va- 
riety of characters that he has played. "Fury" 
is a terrific sort of thing, filled with ad- 
venture and emotional incidents, but withal 
a logical enough piece, and uncommonly 
well acted by a company including Dorothy 
Gish, Tyrone Power and Pat Hartigan. The 



superior direction of Henry King has much 
to do with the success of this and other 
Barthelmess productions. 
Alcazar 

"The Outrageous Mrs. Palmer" proves to 
be another Wilkes success. It is one of the 
best comedies seen at the Alcazar this sea- 
son and affords a wonderful opportunity 
for both Nana Bryant and Dudley Ayres to 
shew how clever they are. The rest of the 
company are well cast, and the performance 
is one of finished excellence, reflecting credit 
on the management. This must not be read 
as mere perfunctory comment. Often it is the 
impression of the evening as a whole that 
the critic brings away with him, rather than 
one of details, and when this is harmonious 
and satisfying that means that a good di- 
rector and a good company have demon- 
strated good team work. 



Jack Pickford and Dr. Coue 
At California 

The title of the picture, "Garrison's Fin- 
ish," has become almost synonymous with 
intense and suspended interest in the racing 
world. To those who love to go from thrill 
to thrill, to hold their breath till it bursts 
from them in gusty relief, to sit on the edge 
of their seats and clutch the arms of their 
chairs, and in short to be so carried along 
by exciting incidents that everything is for- 
gotten save the fate of the dashing young 
hero, here's a picture of endless delight. 
Jack Pickford has a congenial role, that of 
a jockey, and he does some noble riding. 
Madge Bellamy gives him good support. 
Clarence Burton and Charles Ogle are also 
in the cast. Ben Black's band is very much 
in the spotlight. In the International News 
film we have a glimpse of Dr. Emile Coue, 



Instruments for the Deaf 
Special Demonstration 

Experts now demonstrating the newest 

and smallest instrument for the deaf, the 

I'HONOI'HOK 

Roaring and buzzing sounds eliminated. 

Receiver is worn in the ear and is almost 
Invisible. 

PORT-O-PHONE 

An improved electrical instrument for the 
deal' or slightly deaf will be found to be 

a great aid. 

Exclusive Agents. 

W. I). Fennimore A. B. Fennimor« 

J. W. D«vli 




mmm 



San Francisco - 181 Post, 2608 MUilon SU. 
Berkeley - - 2106 Shattack Avenue 

Oakland ------ 1221 Broadway 



January 20, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 

ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 

Fourth Populiir Concert 

EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 

Thurs. Eve., Feb. 1, 8:20 

Last San Kraneiseo Appearance o£ 

BENNO 

MOISEIVITCH 

The Fiimmis Russiiui Pianist, (Juest ArtiHt 

Reserved Seats $1, 75c. 50c and 25c 

(No war tax) 

Now "a Salt- at Sherman. Clay & Co.'S 

Direction Auditorium Committee, 
Board of Supervisors 



the little Frenchman whose fame is founded 
upon his jingle, "Every day in every way I 
am getting better and better." Said in 
French, the language in which it was first 
conceived, the jargon is even more intrigu- 
ing. 



Granada 

"Kick In" is better known as a stage 
play, the author, Willard Mack, having made 
his great success with it in this form. George 
Fitzmaurice, however, with his remarkable 
screen version, is going to establish its pop- 
ularity among the motion picture public. The 
picture makes a strong appeal, and in the 
capable cast are Bert Lytell, May McAvoy, 
Gareth Hughes and Betty Compson — four 
names to conjure with! There is some ex- 
cellent acting done and the interest is held 
taunt throughout. Paul Ash is caught funny 
again, this time in Holland, with lots of 
dancing and singing. A Felix comedy is 
genuinely amusing, and Wallace at the organ 
furnishes a pleasant musical interlude. 



Curran 

Kolb and Dill complete their prolonged 
engagement this week, and with "Now and 
Then" will leave San Francisco for a whole 




The 

HOTEL 

gTfRANCIS 

Hotel St. Prmncli l>r»nr«* Orchestra 
Directed by 

FRANK ELLIS 

^Dancing Every Evening 
IN THE GARDEN 

DINNER AFTER THEATRE 

THOS. J.COLEMAN 

MANAGER 



year to languish and long for their return. 
The enthusiastic following of this pair of 
comedians lost no opportunity to demon- 
strate to them both the fact that their popu- 
larity in this city is impregnable. Next week 
arrives "The Bat," another favorite, tried 
and true. It would seem that nearly every 
theatergoer has seen "The Bat," a play that 
once seen is shorn of its chief feature, that 
is to say the mystery becomes known. But 
the sale of seats has already begun and so 
great is the demand that "The Bat" prom- 
ises to fill the Curran throughout its stay. 



Symphony Orchestra 

The fourth popular concert of the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra, Alfred 
Hertz, conductor, is to be given at the Ex- 
position auditorium on Thursday evening, 
February 1. The fact that San Francisco 
has been giving concerts of this nature, at 
which the audiences average about 9000 
music lovers, is traveling all over the musical 
world and this city. 

Conductor Hertz has chosen as the sym- 
phony for the evening Beethoven's Fifth, 
in C Minor, which he recently played twice 
at the Curran theater with compelling effect. 
Another orchestral number will be the Dance 
of the Blessed Spirits from "Orpheus," by 
Gluck, in which the flute obligato will be 
played by Anthony Linden. Tschaikowsky's 
Italian Caprice will conclude the program. 

The guest artist for the evening will be 
Benno Moiseivitch, the famous Russian pian- 
ist, whose remarkable technique has won him 
world fame. Technically he dazzles and mu- 
sically he charms with the very ease and 
clarity of his interpretations. His number 
with the orchestra will be Liszt's Concerto 
for the Pianoforte, No. I, in E Flat, and he 
will also play a group of solos. 

Reserved seats, as usual, are prices from 
25 cents to $1, and J. Emmet Hayden. chair- 
man of the auditorium committee of the 
board of supervisors, in charge of the con- 
certs, advises that music lovers make their 
bookings early at Sherman. Clay & Co.'s. 

Alcazar 

Richard Walton Tully's triumph success, 
"The Bird of Paradise." with its lure of en- 
chanting seas and mystic isles, and its song 
of far Hawaii, will be produced at the Al- 
cazar as it next attraction, beginning Sun- 
day matinee. January 21. 

"The Bird of Paradise" is a play of un- 
usual fascination. It has a hold on the 
American public, unique in the annals of the 
stage. It has been seen in San Francisco 
several times, and those who have missed 
seeing it in the past have a real treat in 
store. 

Nana Bryant is ideally suited to the role 
of Luana. the winsome little Hawaiian her- 
oine, and those who heard her sing in a 
recent production will appreciate how well 
she may be expected to render the delight- 
ful musical numbers that are interspersed. 

An especially engaged group of Hawaiian 
singers and dancers will add to the charm 



HOTEL PLA7A 

San francisco 



DINING-ROOM 

Surprisingly good meals 
pleasingly served. Note 
t h e moderate prices : 

Jreal ( r a »t 25c to 75c 
Luncheon 65c 
Dinner SI. 26 

(A la Carte Service alao) 




of the production. The play requires the 
full slrength of the regular company, to- 
gether with a dozen extra players. 



" 'A burnt child dreads the fire,' " an- 
nounced the teacher during the lessons in 
proverbs. "Now give me a sentence different 
in wording but meaning the same thing." 

A grimy hand shot up from the back of 
the class. 

"Please, teacher," came a small voice, 
"A washed child dreads the water." 











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IREPROOF STORAG 

CKING MOVII 

SHIPPING 


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VILSON BROS. CO., he 


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IA90-taSH M.irkrt BtfYfi 

ll»M« eva 1 rnnklln »nrf fimifli 

TolrplM.nr* rark 271 



Edoson Radio Phones 

Adostabte Diaphragm Clearance 



C*m Mfl, ■ | 



£desonPboneCa68«ciS..Dcp<. A 9 




18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 20, 1923 



Fred Kahn 



Automotive Engineering in its 
Entirety 

UNDER ONE ROOF 



General Repairing and Overhauling 


Fender and 
Radiator Work 
Body Building 
Woodwork 
Machine Work 


Ignition 

Welding 

Krazing 

Blacksmithing 

Electrical 


Carbu 


•etion 



Experts in Every Branch 
1507 SUTTER Telephone West 8296 

Authorized Elgin Parts and Service 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint jot guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Tour investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3419 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

II mi r* : 2 till 4, and by Appointment 

Phone Suiter 1718 

REMOVED TO 

Howard Build in?, 209 Post Street 

Corner Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



1 The Automobile 8 

i II 

ISH!KBS!gHBHMH'SHgBHBHHB[B3BH!liSB®3 
A Tax on Gasoline 
Chief Thomas M. MacDonald, of the U. 
S. Bureau of Public Road's, urges the na- 
tionalization of taxation system based on 
gasoline consumption by motorists, as a rev- 
enue for keeping highways and automobile 
roads in good condition. Seventeen states 
have this system in operation, and it is 
growing in favor all over the country. Mac- 
Donald figures that it is possible to raise 
a revenue of $40,000,000 annually for good 
roads by imposing a tax of 1 cent per gal- 
lon for gasoline consumed. In England the 
legislators are seriously considering the re- 
introduction of such a system, which was 
discarded two years ago in favor of the 
American plan of taxation by horsepower. 



Billboards 

The American Automobile Association's 
attack on the billboard as an eyesore, and 
the cause of accidents, has brought forth 
a protest from Maurice Switzer, vice presi- 
dent of the Kelly-Springfield Tire Company, 
who is directing the campaigns of one of 
the largest users of billboards. 

Following the publication of the utterances 
of President George C. Diehl, the trade has 
soundly rapped the Three A's for what is 
termed an unworthy attack. Diehl takes ex- 
ception to the large signboards placed in the 
curves of the road, contending that the per- 
son driving desires to see what is around 
the curve much more than he wants to look 
at an advertising sign, while Switzer, on the 
other hand, says he knows of instances where 
headlights, falling on a brilliantly painted 
board, has saved the motorist from going 
over the embankment. 

From the standpoint of a publisher, sign- 
boards along traveled roads are the means 
of taking just so much business away from 
his publication, besides being an eyesore to 
the traveler, and a detriment as regards the 
beauty of the scene. 



Peerless Values Firmly Established 

Since the introduction of its new line the 
Peerless Motor Car Company has been mark- 
edly successful in associating in the public 
mind the idea of value with the identity of 
its product. So firmly is the line established, 
therefore, that any immediate change in its 
status is unlooked for. Present agitation of 
the price question renders this conclusion im- 
portant. It is confirmed by official word 
from the company itself to the effect that 
present costs of material and labor will not 
permit price reductions. 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



me ^ 

MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEX EON 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



1140 Geary Street 



Tel. Franklin 3685 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining tu Automobiles 
Oxy- Acetylene Welding — Blacksmithing 

H. XV. Culver M. Daberer E. Johnson 



LEE S. DOLSON 



CHAS. J. EVANS 



Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

05 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 

$1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Olnners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Salts Pressed by Hand, Only — 
1 Suits Called for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 
433 Mason St. Phone Franklin 2510 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 






I Compensation 

General 
Liability 

Plate Glass 




Piilelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Accident and 
Health 

Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR . . Manager 

105 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. ■ 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY^ 

NEW YORK 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Company in America" 

FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, WINDSTORM, 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 

REASONABLE RATES 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings 

Banks ot San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 30th, 1922 

Assets $80,671,392.53 

Deposits 76,921,392.53 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,750,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 400,613.61 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement Si. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haightand Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter 

(4' i ) per cent per annum was declared for the six 

months ending December 31 st, 1922. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 
Anglo-London-Paris Company 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 5 600 
San Francisco. Calif 



RECOMMENDS 



Irrigation District Bonds 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because (hoy r:ink abend of 

first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6 3 4% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOND 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid Op C»plt*l » I .-..000.000 tlj.000.000 Imm Fond 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

486 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG.: NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.: SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD. Assistant Manager 



1 sa^rV" '*»*^» ' »* *A/**+* 




N. W. CORNER 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to II p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno I 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



Electrical Repairs, Making and 

Bprajring, Electrical Fixtures, 

Wiring, Supplies 

Goldberg Electric Co. 

ELECTRICAL CONTR ICTORS 

•Jir.Ui Polk Street 
Phone Prospect 7528 



^\\ FRANCISCO 



- c XI. IF. 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin !» 
No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon ( 1 1 :.10 to 2 p. m.) .... 76c 
Dinner, Weak Bajn »i.50 

DtaBflr, Sundays and Holidays 91.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

'Half Dollar' Specials 
for the Busy Man 



151 Powell Strem 






is H 



P> 



^^ECHANICALLY The Larkins 
Top is guaranteed for the life of 
your car. It combines beauty of line 
with mechanical perfection. 




3700 Geary Str 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Jarkins Auto mobile Pai nting Iast s Jonger 



gggj 



..».(»><.. 



Home of the Ry-namel Finish 







PRICE 10 CENTS " $5.00 PER YEAR 

California Advertiser 



SAN FRANCISCO 



fURDAY, JANUARY 27, 192 




OS ANGELES 



"N Ht lire i- «•» rr l"\ M> : all hrr mood- 
\rc hut tlic i>iii" ir.( -> mboU of it grrmt 
Vnil mv'i' HJ " ■ 'lion> tlmt «»»*r H 
With rwsflll* nn ■ ie*« man'- own oti»te." 



Greatest Comfort at 
Lowest Cost! 

Gruss Air Springs are engineered Pneu- 
matic Shock Absorbers, built by exclu- 
sive shock absorber manufacturers. 

They interpose generous cushions of air 
between road and load. They link to- 
gether supreme passenger comfort and 
greatest operating economy. 

They make any car an easier riding car. 
The tire and motor savings they effect 
are soon larger than their first cost. 

Let us prove this — today. 




GRUSS AIR SPRING COMPANY gS 



865 Post St. 
San Francisco, Calif. 



£*3 



GrussA|T$prings 

"MakoM^ads Voulevardr 



w 







— ask any expert 




Mil*! 


VK&r 




Motor Longevity 




is NOT Luck 




Th? ite or a motor is not a pro- 
blerr of chance. It is purely a matter 
of vise ireatrnent Correct lubri- 
catior will eliminate 50% of all 
engine troubles Correct lubrication 
15 Monoerarr lubrication 




Instead of buying a new car next 
season use Monogram Oils and 
Grease this season 




New Vor.k Lubricating Oil Company 




UAiiAnn 111 

■■l OILS ANO CREASES \MM 




flunuuif/iPl 


Si's your %>lor'sJlfe insurance 







Another Guaranteed Gardner 



<Tr 



nan 




We extend to the 192 3 Gardner a one-year 
WRITTEN GUARANTEE 

— Because it is a Four, with the assured economy found 
in Fours alone. 

— Because the FIVE-BEARING CRANKSHAFT, a fea- 
ture found in no other four-cylinder motor, makes 
possible exceptional power and flexibility without 
the vibration that shortens the life of engines less 
well built. 

— Because it is a car of BALANCED VALUE, with a 
sturdy chassis: well-built, comfortable body: last- 
ing finish — a car made for long and trouble-free 
service. 

— Because it is the product of an organization that has 
served the public with dependable transportation for 
more than 40 years. 

Let us demonstrate the 192 3 Gardner. The story is best 
told on the road 

J. W. FRAWLEY, Inc. 

1135 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Prospect 9160 




Announcing the Completion 

of the Red Square 

Vacuum Cup Cord Line! 

We are positive no tire ever introduced was accepted 
with the whole-hearted enthusiasm that marked the an- 
nouncement of Pennsylvania Red Square Vacuum Cup 
Cord Tires in Ford sizes. 

The reasons are obvious: 

Cord tires which strictly maintain the Penn- 
sylvania standard of highest quality; 

Cord tires readily interchangeable with the 
thousands of fabric tires now in use; 

Cord tires selling at prices so moderate as to 
make the change from fabric to cord equip- 
ment a matter of actual economy. 

TANSEY- CROWE COMPANY 

1233 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Prospect 2000 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1856 








Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. CII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1923 



No. 4 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building. Bush and Montgomery Streets. 
San Francisco. Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco. 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill. E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year. $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit Action and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



— It was commonly called the "Quarts Ball," which, after all, 
was expressing it mildly. 

— We know a woman who is such a perfect lady that she should 
be put away safely in a museum, and labeled, along with the Dodo 
and other extinct birds. 

— Just as a woman learns how to love she finds herself too old 
to attract a lover, which may be paraphrasing Emerson, who said 
that just as we learn how to live we die. 

— Politics are the husks, the outer wrappings of the kernel, or 
the state. Through what devious and deceptive unwindings we 
must go to arrive at the fundamental principles! 

— "Amongst the events of the past, there is little upon which to 
congratulate ourselves," says the new statesman of England. "It 
has been a year of failure and futility, ending in a situation which 
is as melancholy as it well could be." 

* * * 

— In looking over English publications, one of the qualities we find 
most admirable is their frank and unprejudiced criticism of their 
government, their people, and themselves. The English race is apt 
to be super-critical of others, but at least they take their own medi- 
cine. 

— Former Secretary of Treasury William Gibbs McAdoo is going 
to establish a motor bus system in Los Angeles, similar to those 
operated in New York. Chicago, Detroit, and other large east- 
ern cities. It is to be hoped that he makes more of a financial success 
of this line than he did when he was running the railroads of the 
United States. 

— Here is Dr. Frederick W. D'Evelyn coming out as an apostle 
of the doctrines of Baha. Time works wonders and people take 
strange and unexpected paths as the years go by. Here is the 
doughty doctor, veteran of the Boer war in which he lost a leg 
and used to delight in telling how a dog ran through the camp 
with it after it was amputated, the exponent of the value of force 
and the upholder of imperialism, now devoting his declining years 
to the teachings of the gentle mystic of Mount Carmel. Verily, 
we none of us know where we shall end up. 



— Just as business in the United States is reaching a normal 
condition, it looks as if Wilson's dangerous precedent was going 
to drag us into battle smoke again. 

— Farington, the English writer, in his diary mentions the fact 
that at a sale of paintings, "Gainsborough's picture of a boy in a 
blue Van Dyke dress, sold for thirty-five guineas." Compare this 
price to the amount that the "Blue Boy" brought last year! The 
good in art still endures. 

— The California and Hyde Street Railway Company should 
run several extra cars during the rush hours. In taking the steep 
hills on Jones street and on California street, the smell of a smok- 
ing cable, straining under an overloaded car, is enough to make 
the most self-composed nervous. 

— The European press is impressing upon us that the Prince of 
Wales is going to marry for love. The day is past, it is stated, 
when governments pick out an eligible bride for the male members 
of the royal family. Under the old regime, it is astonishing that 
the royal families possess any physical or mental health at all. 

* * * 

— A Minnesota court ruling to the effect that a man not heard 
from for seven years, is legally dead, opens up the way for easier 
annulments of marriages, besides complications in the way of con- 
testing last wills and testaments. But taking all this into considera- 
tion, it seems a wise ruling. What woman, in these days of eman- 
cipation, is going to wait more than seven years for a man? Or 
seven weeks, for that matter? 

* * * 

— It seems strange, does it not. that all the nations of the world 
are today deploring war. and trying to lay the blame of war 
upon their neighbor's shoulders, even while the red banner of 
battle is waving over a good part of the globe? "Five wealthy men 
of the world are responsible for all wars," we were once told. Can 
this be true? Are the billions of men and women swarming over 
the earth just the puppets of "five wealthy men"? 

* * * 

— Johnson's amendment introduced at the present assembly, re- 
lating to the bill regarding defrauding innkeepers and merchants, 
wherein a person obtaining food and clothing or credit or accom- 
modation at a hotel, or inn. etc.. is guilty of a misdemeanor, seems 
at first reading to be quite reasonable, and a good way in which 
to deal with the ordinary "dead beat": but this law, if put into 
effect, might be the means of conditions becoming as hideous as 
those which existed in England, when a man could be imprisoned 
for debt, but his corpse could be held by the magistrate should 
he die in the meantime. Personally, we do not see what advantage 
this would be to the creditor, but it certainly would be the means 
of making a most unpleasant situation for all concerned. 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




Out of the moiling mass of problems 
The European Condition standing forth for solution in Europe of 

course the important one of the payment 
of the German reparation money to France juts forth as the most 
serious and crying loudest for a just solution. It is necessary, be- 
fore expressing an opinion to know exactly what is the situation be- 
tween the Germans and the allied nations against whom she so re- 
cently waged a most devastating and horrid war. 



When the allied nations and Germany finally 
The Versailles Award came to an inconclusive peace, at the time 

of the armistice, there were plenty of econo- 
mists and others who predicted exactly the conditions which have 
followed. It was felt in Europe that Germany had no intention 
whatever, unless FORCED so to do, to live up to any of the condi- 
tions imposed upon her through the Versailles conferences. 



The mistakes which have been made since that 
One Mistake time by all nations involved in the settlement have 

After the Other been so numerous it is useless to mention them 

here. Great Britain has lead in piling these one 
upon the other. Lloyd George has been accused of many things 
and among these the charge is made of trying to winnow a harvest 
of larger trade for Great Britain out of the misfortunes of others. 



The French, it must be admitted, know 
France and Her Viewpoint more of Germany's economic position 

than do any of the other nations. France 
has suffered more than has any other nation. To the Frenchman 
it is a hideous idea that she should not only have to stand the 
losses inflicted upon her by Germany, the losses in destroyed homes, 
the wholesale carrying off of her machinery, the utter destruction 
of her coal mines by explosions, the broadcast poisoning of her 
fields to the absolute impossibility of raising crops for years to 
come, the pollution of her water supplies, the annihilation of her 
means of subsistence for nearly one-third of her national area. Shall 
nothing be said of the destruction of her man power and the re- 
moval of her young womanhood? The killing of her youth? 

In such as the latter the reparation by an attacking nation, when 
it is finally brought to a stand, is impossible. But for material dam- 
age Germany IS and must be made responsible. And the French 
say she should be made to pay and they also claim the right to 
say so when all other nations should be silent or approve whatever 
action may be taken to make Germany pay. 



And the action has been taken by France to 
The Action Taken carry out the Versailles award to make her an- 
cient enemy pay. France claims Germany has 
been malingering. France claims she knows that Germany can pay 
and must be made to pay. France claims that those who stand 
afar off and take the position France is precipitating another war 
are wrong and the Frenchman cannot understand how it is that 
people of other nations are even now arguing against France and 
her methods. France denies that she wishes any intervention and, 
if necessary, says she will carry the war to Berlin and there dictate 
the peace that should have been long ago. 



The other side to this question is taking a very 
The Other Side vehement stand that the French are entering the 

heart of a country and that it is practically war, 
which is now being waged against the Germans. They deplore such 



action and they seem to forget the great war, and all of the de- 
vastation wrought by the Germans when . they threw their gray- 
green hordes into the fair fields of Belgium and France. The claim 
is made that "some other way" should be found to settle these 
matters. The only way that would be satisfactory to the German 
people would be to absolve them of all debts to anyone whatsoever, 
because the German believes fundamentally and fully that he was 
never wrong, and never has been beaten. He claims he was not 
beaten militarily and now he is going to prove, if he is allowed to 
so do, that he cannot be beaten at the economic game. 



It is folly to argue a great many 
The Good American Citizen Americans are in favor of letting Ger- 
many entirely out of paying the repa- 
rations and it is equally foolish to say the Americans are in any 
very large proportion of them pro-Germans. But it is true that, 
taking the position of protesting against the so-called French in- 
vasion, a great many people are simply aiding the Germans in evad- 
ing making any kind of reparation at all without, in any way, sug- 
gesting any better method of forcing the Germans to make these 
payments than is now being employed by the French. They pre- 
dict a full and complete failure of the French method. 



The situation in Europe before the invasion 
The Situation was one of stalemate, and no one was gain- 

Before the Invasion ing any ground, while the situation in Ger- 
many was getting worse and worse with every 
day. The people of Germany were being exploited to a fare-you- 
well by the rich men of Germany and these men were marketing 
the products paid for with worthless German paper marks in the 
world at large and they were collecting for this product in gold and 
depositing this gold NOT IN GERMANY but in Swiss and English 
and Holland banks "where it would be safe." France was attempt- 
ing to make its own way without the help it should have had from 
Germany, and Belgium was bravely doing the same thing. France 
claims that every sort of a business arrangement suggested to Ger- 
many was turned down with the statement "we are broke and can- 
not pay." Now France proposes to go right down into the aggre- 
gate German pocket and into Germany's productive possibilities and 
drag out the money which she claims is justly due. 



You may know these by their records. 
Certain American Politicians Look at these records ever since the 

Germans precipitated the war into Bel- 
gium and France. We have one notable senator who is making him- 
self very much heard from these days. He lives, and has his votes, 
in a Missouri district where, in some places, only the German lan- 
guage is spoken. We have other kinds of politicians, too, and these 
are opposed to any "mixing in European politics" at all and they 
want no soldiers of ours on the Rhine or anywhere else in Europe. 
They want us out of it altogether and they believe we should never 
have been in it at all. Which would have meant a German victory! 



A new section proposed by Mr. Heisinger at 
Another Blue Law the present state assembly provides that no 

marriage license shall be issued by the county 
clerk of any county to any woman under the age of forty-five years, 
or man of any age except to marry a woman over the age of forty- 
five, without the presentation by applicant of a certificate executed 
within fifteen days from the time of the presentation of said cer- 
tificate to the county clerk, showing the non-existence of any vener- 



January 27, 1923 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



eal disease, the non-existence of tuberculosis in the infectious stages, 
the non-existence of scrofula, and that the applicant is not an epi- 
leptic, feeble-minded person or idiot; such certificate to be executed 
by a reputable physician. Any person violating any of the pro- 
visions of this section, etc., to be punished by a fine of not more 
than $500, or by imprisonment in the county jail for not more than 
thirty days. 

The above proposed amendment, if put into effect, would seem 
at first glance to be a law that would tend toward the betterment 
and advancement of the human race. It is a law that certainly 
must have the backing of the bloodless Eugenics Cult, of all the 
aggressively earnest, thin-lipped reformers in this land of rapidly 
increasing arch-angels. 

We have a vision before us of human beings as perfect physically 
and (possibly) mentally, as the athletic and esthetic Grecians of 
the Olympian days. The possibilities of human perfection in a state 
enforcing such a law, would seem illimitable. We visualize our- 
selves bidding a long adieu to disease, of either mind or body, to 
poverty, which is the consequence of prolific and indescriminate 
breeding, to everything else that is sordid and ugly in a world that 
was originally made for beauty. 

There is another aspect, however, to this enthralling picture. This 
condition of things might be worked out in a theoretical way, but 
there are hard, unromantic facts that are to be reckoned with. The 
reputable physician of today will tell you that tuberculosis and 
syphilis exist to some degree in the majority of human beings. W e 
have personally heard the verdict of a medical clinic in this city 
upon a woman of our acquaintance of irreproachable morals, ex- 
quisitely clean, smooth-skinned, with no visible sign of any blood 
disease. And the verdict pronounced her a victim of syphilis! Later 
on, consulting other physicians, she was told that she was simply 
"run down from too much worry; at a critical time of life; and 
only needed building up and rest." 

This, no doubt, is only one case in many. If human beings are 
dependent upon such mistaken diagnoses, when they wish to as- 
sume the matrimonial yoke, we contemplate with anxiety the grad- 
ual extinction of poor, defrauded Hymen! Looking at it from the 
viewpoint of human emotions — hate, jealousy, love — we could 
prophesy these emotions entering into some tangle in which the 
physician's personal feelings might dominate; for after all, phy- 
sicians are only human, and have all a human's failings! 

A state law of such radical quality, could bring about numerous 
interstate complications. For instance, there would be nothing to 
prevent a man in California, condemned as unfit for marriage, 
joining in "holy wedlock" the woman of his choice in Nevada or 
Mexico, or any place over the border, and bringing her back as 
his lawfully wedded wife. Marriages outside the three-mile limit in 
the Pacific, or up in a balloon, will increase accordingly. A law 
of this sort might work out satisfactorily on a desert island, never 
visited by ship or airplane. It is a measure instituted by idealists, 
very admirable, but doomed to failure, just as the Volstead act is 
doomed, and like the latter amendment, its instigators fail to take 
into consideration the fact that human beings are human, and not 
automatons. 



Adequacy of transportation facilities is a true 
Need of Adequate measure of a city's prosperity and is its insurance 
Transportation for its future growth. Population comes only 

when adequate transportation is assured. Most 
of our urban population is dependent on our street cars for their 
means of getting to and from their homes and businesses. It is 
for this reason that we are so much interested as citizens in any- 
thing that betters our street car facilities. 

There is great demand for extensions and the city is urged from 
many sources to extend our present municipal street car system 



into our undeveloped districts so as to provide for their better de- 
velopment. Our city needs street car extensions and must have 
them if she expects to grow. The question is what is the best way 
to get them. It seems to be the opinion of the larger organized 
bodies in the various districts of the city that proper extensions 
could be more quickly, surely and better accomplished and a greater 
amount of expense eliminated if the city should take over the prop- 
erties of the Market Street Railway Company, to be paid for out 
of their earnings, as provided for in the charter amendment passed 
by an overwhelming majority at the last election. In such an event 
the proposed extensions could be provided for at a much less cost 
than under the present plan of extending the Municipal railway, 
and a more economical method of operation could be adopted by 
rerouting and consolidating the various lines of our several street 
car systems under a unified management and control. Extensions 
would be more likely to be obtained under these conditions than 
at present. 

We are committed to the policy of municipal ownership of public 
utilities and it is so prescribed by our city charter. Our Municipal 
railway has been a great success during its ten years of existence 
and there seems to be no reason why we should not completely 
unify our street car system under city ownership and get the bene- 
fits immediately of a unified street car transportation system, such 
as improved street car service on existing lines; needed extensions 
into outlying districts; through cars without change; universal trans- 
fers; shorter and more direct routes to all parts of our city. 



It seems a great pity that a city as large as ours, 
San Franc sco with bank clearings steadily on the increase every 
Stage Guild week, with our boasted "independent and intelli- 

gent audiences," our love of beauty and all that 
is fine in the various arts, cannot support an institution as excellent 
as the San Francisco Stage Guild for a second season of plays. 

We have supported and enjoyed a splendid symphony orchestra 
for several years. Is our love of the legitimate drama not as strong 
as our musical inclinations) Are we becoming so "movie mad" that 
we can experience no thrill in clever plays like "Enter Madam"? 
Or in tragedies like "The Doll's House"? 

The success or failure of the San Francisco Stage Guild, and its 
earnest and talented members, is in the hollow of the hands of our 
wealthy San Francisco patrons of the drama. 



— Senator Victor Canepa has faithfully and consistently spoken 
for an aquatic park on our water front; preferably located on that 
part of the bay east of Fort Mason, as being the most sheltered 
section. Anyone watching the intrepid bathers who plunge into 
the waters from the South End Boat Club, even on the most chilly 
day. would realize the success of such a pleasure ground. This 
is one of the fourteen bills offered on the first call for introduction 
of new measures in the senate session, and it should go through. 
San Francisco is woefully lacking in places of amusement for a 
city of its size. 



The Sweetness 
of Low Prices 



Never Equals 



The Bitterness 
of Poor Quality 



We combine Quality, Price and Service 

JOHNSON BROS., Grocers 

Fillmore St. at Sacramento— At Yoor Command Phone Weit t*« 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 27. 1923 



I W DtiWimH I * 



sHSSagS'SSSSSHaaKSKaaa^^ 




Lonely Ladies 



3,SI¥SaI » III » IS.a » ».» » it a ?S? « « SS » "« .? »!?;«?» a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a aiaS a" .a aaS MMJi!!: :x a a :t sain a" a a a 

By ELEANORE F. ROSS 




THERE was an abrupt hush in the room of busily sewing women, 
when Miss Anstruther came in, which was felt at once by that 
sensitive soul, and resented. In the old-fashioned sewing circle of 
the suburban church which she and her sister had originated, she 
was respected by every member, and also loved. But occasionally 
she perceived that these women pushed her outside their intimacies, 
in spite of the very evident affection in which they held her. 

If they had been asked the reason for this spiritual isolation they 
might have been puzzled for an answer. "Miss Anice is so reserved, 
so refined, — well, different from most women," possibly would have 
been the reply of certain ladies; "And of course she has never 
been married, and being the only single woman, you know " 

The joy of the spring day which had thrilled Anice as she had 
walked along the tree-lined streets of the village to the rose-em- 
bowered church, was spoiled in a measure at the very entrance of 
the guild room. Why was she always placed in the position of an 
outsider? Hadn't she tried to take a keen interest in all of the 
affairs of the little church and its parishioners? Suddenly a re- 
solve to break into this unexplained and irritating barrier took pos- 
session of her usually timid soul, and she cleared her throat pre- 
emptorily. 

"Won't you take me into the conference which 1 have evidently 
interrupted?" she asked in her pleasantly soft voice; "I am sure 
it was about something interesting." 

Everyone turned to the minister's wife, a self-satisfied, importantly 
sociable woman, past her first youth, but showing in every man- 
nerism her desire to "head the procession" in all matters pertain- 
ing to the activities of village life, social and political. 

An embarrassing silence ensued, and then Mrs. White took her 
handkerchief from her beaded bag (a Christmas gift from the ladies 
of the congregation), wiped her glasses, perched them on a thin 
and aristocratic nose, and spoke : 

"Well, Miss Anstruther, we had not thought of bothering you 
with this village scandal, but since you insist, it's about my maid 
Jessie, you know her, I believe? She has gotten into trouble, and 
of course I must get rid of her. She has no relatives, and we are 
all anxious as regards the best thing to do about her. I cannot 
keep her — there are Glen and Alice. She won't tell the man's name; 
very stubborn, I call it. If we could find him, I'm sure something 
could be done! But as it is, I have told her that she must leave 
by Sunday. This is Wednesday — " her voice trailed off in unusual 
confusion, under Miss Anice's look, a mingling of bewilderment, 
trouble, indignation, even contempt. 

A picture of Jessie, as she had last seen the girl, came into her 
mind. She had taken a cross cut through a neighbor's meadow, 
and had come upon her, standing knee deep in clover and poppies, 
buttercups and cream cups, all the profusion of California wild 
flowers in spring. How like a flower she had looked that day, 
with cheeks like wild roses, eyes like blue lupine, and blown tresses 
as yellow as the buttercups at her feet. 

In trouble? What sordid earthly touch had been laid upon this 
delicate little creature? Anice knew the comparative slavery of 
a maid's position in Mrs. White's employ. Jessie was dishwasher, 
cook's helper, chambermaid, seamstress. How often she had won- 
dered how the girl, performing all of these menial tasks, could re- 
tain her freshness and beauty. And now, what fresh indignity had 



been heaped upon her, to at last conquer the resilience of youth? 

She came back sharply to the present — the gathering of women, 
a few expressing concern, sadness, trouble, sympathy; others disap- 
proval, smug contempt, a guilty but avid interest — the usual relish 
which a provincial community evinces in anything of a scandalous 
nature. Something must be done before this (for the most part) 
narrow-minded tribunal could bring judgment upon the erring one 
of their own sex. 

It meant courage of a sort for Anice to speak unreservably to 
this assemblage. This incident came as a shock in her old-maidenly, 
quiet, humdrum life. She and her sister Beulah, (Beulah, her anti- 
thesis in almost everything fundamental, a brisk and practical house- 
wife, not at all given to day-dreams as Anice was — always, so to 
speak, "reducing things to their least common multiple," as her 
sister said laughingly), lived in a small cottage "across the tracks," 
and outside of the "smart" part of town, but because of their 
breeding, the tradition of their family, possibly because of their 
apparent indifference to the acceptance or rejection of the "400" 
of the little town, generally sought for in all social matters. 

Into this simple life the occurance came as nothing short of trag- 
edy, and a sordid and repellant tragedy at that. Anice had read 
of such occurances, with the usual distaste of the well-bred, well- 
thinking, repressed and undeveloped spinster. Of course, that sort 
of thing did happen — to other people! But it was appalling to 
think that it should touch even the outside rim of the small circle 
in which she moved. 

To face Mrs. White, the social arbiter, and strive to show her 
where her treatment of the girl was at fault was a task that might 
make the boldest woman hesitate, and to Anice it was doubly diffi- 
cult. Nevertheless, she set her small jaw and spoke. 

"It was good of you in the beginning to take Jessie in, Mrs. 
White, unknown as she was, and penniless," she began bravely; 
"but all your good work will be undone, if you let her go now. 
This may be an experience that she will outgrow. She is so young, 
she has never known a mother ; there are so many extenuating 
circumstances to plead for her. Cannot we all subscribe a sum to 
see her through this? Send her away somewhere for a while; per- 
haps find a home for the — child; Beulah and I will help — " 

Mrs. While broke in harshly: "I consider that all my good work 
is already undone," she exclaimed angrily; "as for not having a 
mother, why, I have been the same as a mother to her for years. 
And how can any woman, Miss Anice, 'outgrow an experience' of 
this kind? You speak from the goodness of your heart, no doubt, 
but you are unversed in these matters." Her thin lips closed in a 
straight line. 

"Then you intend to let Jessie go?" Miss Anice felt it absolutely 
useless to say more. 

"I certainly do." The ultimatum came sharp and cold. " I can- 
not have an example of this kind before my two children!" 

Anice's answer came back, sharply and clearly: "Then send Jessie 
to me, please!" 

* * * 

The Anstruther cottage nestled under the big Eucalyptus trees on 
Burlingame avenue, that straight white road which leads from the 
depot to the bay. There was always an old-time flavor in its atmos- 
phere, a faint whispering of the gay and profligate days of the 



January 27, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



early eighties, when elegance rather than noisy ostentation ruled 
the smart set of the peninsula. One could imagine stately "coach 
and four" with clip-clipping of horse's hoofs, sweeping past. Across 
the meadow, which had once been a racetrack, rose the ramshackle 
judge's eyrie, long fallen into disuse and decay, a symbol of the 
merry days before an insensate and crime-breeding wave of reform 
had struck the "golden state" from the east. 

Anice Anstruther loved this road. The "other side of the tracks" 
was prettier, and the houses among the hills more desirable, but 
that section smacked of newness, and this, of comparative age and 
tradition. She thought that no sight was ever lovelier, more roman- 
tic, or alluring than moon-light filtering down amongst the Eucalyp- 
tus leaves, onto the white and silent road; no sound sweeter than 
the wind among the trees, or the faint splash of mimic waves on 
the pebbly shore. 

Tonight she had much to ponder over, but gradually the spell 
of the moon swept all problems and deliberation from her mind, 
leaving it wistfully tranquil and introspective. 

This affair of Jessie's stirred her as nothing had done since her 
one and only love affair so many gray years ago. It brought into 
being again the old lonliness, the old rebellion. No casual observer, 
looking at the woman's faded rose of a face, could read in it any- 
thing but a placid pride of race, a sweet but impersonal sympathy; 
a resolve to never allow emotion to rule. He or she could not 
see back of the big gray eyes, the longing and urge for life, life, 
life! Not the sedate and narrow life of a suburban town, but the 
vitality involved in the struggle of big cities; big enterprises, big 
spaces of the world. 

"Beulah is different," Anice would often tell herself. "She can 
find real interest in sewing circles, pies for church sociables, and 
raising asparagus. Why couldn't I have had her placid nature?" 

Life! The more one experienced of it, the more one became 
entangled in trouble and pain. Still, wasn't it worth it all? Even 
poor little Jessie had had her day, for which she might be called 
upon to suffer for the rest of her existence. 

Irrelevantly Anice's thoughts switched to the last dance given 
in the guild room of the church, and her refusal to dance with 
a certain man who "clerked" in one of the town shops. He was 
one of the few eligibles of Burlingame; that is, in the set in which 
the Anstruthers moved. He was a member of one of the "old" 
but reduced peninsula families, but as a man behind a counter 
he failed to elicit the social patronage of the sisters. His hurt look 
came to Miss Anice's mind, hurt, but as proud as her own. He 
had never, since that occurrance, spoken an unnecessary word to 
her. 

Suddenly she felt there in the quiet silver of the night, very 

small, very lonely and very silly. 

* * ¥ 

A great mass of hyacinths, rose-colored, pale pink, purple and 
white, greeted Anice from the center of the breakfast table that 
morning as she came into the sun-flooded kitchen. The small alcove 
in which the two sisters served their meals, looked out onto trim 
lawns and flower beds that were the delight of the younger woman's 
soul; while the practical Beulah spent her gardening efforts on 
the vegetables, now thriving behind a vine-covered trellis in the 
rear of the lot. Beulah's task was to prepare the meals, and Anice's 
to "wash up." 

"My sister never will come out of the clouds long enough to 
see whether the butcher is giving her chops from the shoulder or 
the rib," Beulah explained to her associates; "so I do the cooking 
and marketing, and Anice the cleaning. In this way we each do 
the things which we can do the best, and that generally brings har- 
mony." 

Anice had decided to "sleep on the question" which had come 
into her usually placid life, before telling her sister of her propo- 



sition. In the bright light of the spring dawn, it seemed very far 
off, unreal and strange. The courage of the moment had forsaken 
her, and the thought of bringing a poor little sinner into her dainty 
home filled her with trepidation. How could she approach the sub- 
ject to good, unimaginative Beulah? Alas! Good people were often 
so difficult! So dense at grasping the cause of mistakes; so nar- 
row in their judgment! Had she not taken a great deal upon her- 
self, in this arranging of Jessie's life? What confliction this arrange- 
ment might make in their quiet home! 

She gulped a little over her morning prunes, and for once found 
breakfast an arduous repast. 

And then the conviction came upon her that the easiest way to 
settle it all was to have Beulah see Jessie when the latter called 
that afternoon. Let the girl tell her own story, plead her own cause; 
surely that would be the best course to pursue to enlist Beulah's 
sympathy. 

Both sisters, as it happened, were in the garden when the slight 
figure came up the path toward them. Anice motioned the girl 
inside the small summer house. Inexperienced as she was in life's 
climaxes, she did not realize how painful she had made the sit- 
uation to Jessie, to her sister, or in fact, to herself. 

Jessie sat down on the rustic bench, folded her hands, fixed her 
blue eyes on Anice's face; mute, miserable, dog-like. Beulah looked 
inquiringly from the girl to her sister, and Anice stared back be- 
wilderedly at Jessie. 

The garden seemed very quiet to the three sitting there; remote 
and isolated from the rest of the world. Just the rustle of the 
yellowed passion flower leaves on the wooden floor; the light splash 
of the sprinkler on the lawn; the twitter of sparrows; the far-off 
bark of a dog; the sound of their own beating hearts; the strange 
lull which comes before life's storms, and after. 

"Beulah," Anice began; "I hardly know how to tell you. I — we — 
never had anything in our lives like this before. Please do not make 



1 



Are you GAMBLING with the comfort 
of your WIFE, the education of your 
CHILDREN, 

the future of your BUSINESS? You may win 
for a time, but in the end you are BOUND 
TO LOSE! 50c a day saved while you LIVE 
will GUARANTEE $5000 when you DIE. 

ARTHUR J. HILL 

California Manager 

State Life Insurance Company of Indiana 

1026 Market St., San Francisco 



r 



■~i 



Ask Mr Hill about it. Mail him this 
blank. No obligation entailed. 



Name 



Address 



_ I 



A(te nearest birthday 



.J 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 27, 1923 



it any harder for me, — but, well, we must both do something for 
Jessie." 

"Do something! Why, of course!" Beulah was all interested and 
brisk attention. Perhaps the child wanted help on a new frock; 
possibly her mistress had been unduly stern to her in regard to 
some neglected duty; maybe Jessie needed a vacation; she did 
look rather pale. Of course, Beulah would do all in her power 
to help her out, in any way! 

"It's not any of the little things that you think, dear," Anice's 
voice broke; "it's a big thing; almost too big for me to grasp yet, 
but we both want your help. Jessie is in serious trouble, and Mrs. 
White is going to send her away. Out of her house; think of it! 
Out onto the streets, perhaps!" 

"Out onto the streets, perhaps!" Jessie repeated, dazedly. The 
streets of the pretty town were pleasant streets; she was quite used 
to them. What did Miss Anice mean? 

The older sister started. Little Jessie! Only a few years ago, it 
seemed, when she first made her appearance among them; fragile, 
appealing. She had been a beautiful child. Too bad that her way 
had opened into such a hard road. She looked at the slight figure, 
just budding into womanhood. It seemed a pity to place upon that 
slim form, reminding her of a beautiful chalice, the grim and ugly 
lines of expectant motherhood! To her own astonishment, she could 
not reconcile the thought of sin and Jessie. A strange intuition crept 
into her heart. This condition had been eventually forced upon the 
child. She felt it; and the girl's pride sealed her lips. 

Anice, still staring, heard a faint gasp from her sister, as Jessie 
dropped upon a bench at Beulah's feet and buried her yellow head 
in the woman's lap. 

"You have each other, Miss Beulah," she sobbed; "You and Miss 
Anice; you don't know how it is to be alone in the world! Of 
course you can't forgive me; I don't expect you to; you are both 
so good!" She choked, and then went on, as if the words had been 
forced from her. "I tried to be good, but I was so lonely, and she 
was so mean to me; and I thought Glen cared for me. And I 
was so lonely. Miss Beulah! None of the other girls would have 
anything to do with me. I was so lonely, lonely lonely!" Her voice 
ended in a wail. 

Beulah gathered the shrinking form into her capable embrace, 
and over the bowed head, met her sister's eyes. Something of the 
great lonliness of the universe spoke through the gray eyes and the 
brown. 

"The little soul that is coming will never be lonely," vowed 
Beulah, softly, "if we can help it I" 



BRIEFLETS 

The $15,000 bond of William D. Haywood, convicted I. W. W. 
leader, has been ordered forfeited and deputies ordered to collect 
the bonds. Haywood fled to Russia and has never returned. 

The hurdy-gurdy grinders of New York City rent their pianos 
by the day. These pianos are stored in a warehouse and the peo- 
ple who rent them are up at dawn, for the first to arrive are the 
first to be permitted to get the best instruments, and the latest tunes. 
They rarely make more than $3 a day and must pay $2 a day rental 
for the instrument. 

In 1916 the total daily attendance at motion picture shows in 
the United States was 20,000,000. This year the daily attendance 
has dropped to 10,000,000 to the great alarm of the motion picture 
controllers. 

A tunnel more than six miles long will be built through the Con- 
tinental Divide in Colorado. This will shorten the distance between 
Salt Lake City and Denver 1 73 miles and shorten the time on 
passenger trains between the two points six hours. 



g s .§ -Eg = =ss = gSESSS & 2 ~ ~ ~ a ~ - ~~ ~ s - s . s ~ ~ " . s 



Have You Heard It? j 

iHSISlHlHiaHBliSBSEHHBHiHlBHiaSlliHilllHSlHHS a « »»««"* 

— Among the many stories apropos the "extras" made by some 
of the New York car conductors: The conductors all carried a 
registering machine on their breasts, and for every fare collected 
they were supposed to pull down the bell, and thus not only register 
the actual receipts, but the number of passengers carried per jour- 
ney. One day an inspector jumped on a car and inquired of a new 
conductor, who had only been on duty three days, "How are you 
getting on, my lad?" "Fine, sir," replied the conductor. "So I 
think," dryly remarked the inspector. "I see you've only registered 
eight fares since starting your journey, and there's fifteen people 
on the car." "Is that so?" was the cool reply. "We'll soon make 
that right." Then, looking inside the car, he shouted out, "Here, 
you chaps in there, seven of ye haven't paid yer fares, an'll have 
to get off." 

— A man, on returning home from his travels in Palestine, brought 
with him some water from the River Jordan for the christening of 
the latest addition to his family. The only receptacle he had handy 
was a spirit flask, and this was filled with the precious liquid. On 
the day appointed for the christening ceremony he sought out the 
minister with the intention of giving him the Jordan water. After 
chatting with the minister about the arrangements, he produced the 
flask from his pocket, but before he could say a word the minister 
held up his hands in shocked surprise. "No, no, sir," he exclaimed 
with a horror-stricken expression, "I couldn't take anything." Then 
putting his hand before his mouth, he whispered confidentially, "but 
ask me again after church is out." 

— A clergyman tells an amusing story against himself. One Sun- 
day morning he was accosted by an old lady, who said to him, 
"I want to tell you, sir, how much I enjoy going to church on the 
days when you preach." "Oh," replied the clergyman, "I'm very 
gratified to hear it." "Yes," she went on with appalling candour, 
"I get such a good seat then. 



train journey a man dashed down the corridor and 



— During 
put his head in at the door of a compartment. 

"Has anyone any whisky?" he asked; "a lady has fainted in the 
next carriage." 

A flask was handed to him. 

He took a good drink, and then said, calmly, "It always upsets 
me to see a lady faint." 

Then he went back to his compartment. 

— Percy was not exactly an Owen Nares, but he wanted to see 
the play all the same. His view of the stage was obstructed by the 
hat of the girl sitting immediately in front of him, and Percy de- 
cided on a mild protest. 

"I say," he said, leaning forward, "I want to look as well as you." 
"Really!" retorted the girl. "Then I'm afraid you will have to 
go home and change your face." 

— Two young men were coming away from a party where the 
principal subject of conversation had been Italian art and artists. 
Said one to the other: "You rather showed your ignorance, old 
chap, didn't you, when you were asked whether you like Rotti- 
celli, and you replied that you preferred Chianti?" 

"Well, what was wrong about that?" inquired the other. 

"Why, you silly ass," was the illuminating reply, "Botticelli isn't 
a wine, it's a cheese." 



January 27. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




I WILL TAKE THE LONE PATH 

I will take the lone path 

That leads up from the sea — 

The dark path on the hillside, 
That winds eternally. 

I will take the still way — 
The quiet way and long, 
Where there's neither laughter, 
Happy love, nor song. 

But though I take the dark lane 

Within the cypress gloom, 
I know there waits me somewhere 

April's scented bloom! 

— Blanche Shoemaker Wagstaff 



COSMIC FRIENDS 

Three sisters have I loved — 

April and May and June; 
And four wild brothers that blow 

Across the hills the moon. 

North, south, and east and west they blow 

The blossom of the moon, 

Making a merry tune; 
Four wild brothers that go ' 
Forever to and fro — 
Arctic, antarctic, snow, 

And tropic noon and noon. 

Seven seas have I for friends, 
That flash along the lonely ends 

Of frozen cape and palm-fringed shore, 
Singing and singing evermore; 
And tossing to and fro the stars. 
And floating worlds and broken spars. 

Sisters three, and wild winds four, 
And seven seas — I ask no more 
For friends of mine. 
Save in the sky the sun to shine! 

■ — Richard Le Callienne. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

A serial story, entitled "The Ranch of the Witch's Head," by 
Eleanor F. Ross, will begin in next week's News Letter, and will 
run for several weeks. This story, with its description of the vicis- 
situdes of a city-bred family on a California ranch, will have no dull 
moments for the reader. It is whimsical, humorous, and. so the 
author says, "absolutely true." 



FILM FLICKS 

BY AGNES KERR CRAWFORD 

FEW people know that today San Francisco boasts ten local 
moving picture corporations, besides the big Pacific Coast Stu- 
dios at San Mateo, and two companies in Oakland, with one at 
Fairfax, Marin county. Several of these corporations are actually 
at work and the rest are all making preparations to begin shooting 
in the very near future, so with the coming of spring there will 
be great activity in and around San Francisco. 

Paul Gerson, head of the Gerson Film Corporation, has recently 
purchased the old Montague studios at 1924 Page street, had them 
enlarged and repaired and in future they will be known as the Gerson 
studios. One unit under the direction of Craig Hutchinson is al- 
ready at work there, and they are doing the first of a series of 
twelve two-reel pictures, made from some of Peter B. Kyne's stories 
published in the Saturday Evening Post. The first picture is called 
"The Blind Goddess," and in it Orral Humphrey is being featured, 
with a cast including Evelyn Nelson, Freeman Wood, George Web- 
ster, Rupert Brunn and others. 

At the old Gerson studio on Tenth street a company with Dan 
Mason of "Tunnieville Trolley" fame as its star, are just finishing 
a year's work. They have made twelve two-reel comedies called 
"The Plum Center Comedies." The town of Belmont has been used 
for the exteriors and will be known to fame in the future as "Plum 
Center." Wilna Hervey, leading lady of the company, is a dear little 
thing, who tips the scales at 300 pounds, and is well over six feet 
tall. Also a not unimportant member of the cast is Wildfire, the 
only laughing race horse in the world. 

Eric Von Stroheim, made famous by his production of "Foolish 
Wives" and other big feature pictures, and now connected with the 
Goldwyn Corporation, is in San Francisco hard at work on the 
continuity for his next picture. It is to be a screen version of Frank 
Norris' famous book "McTeague." and actual work on the picture 
will be begun in the very near future. The scene of the story is 
all in San Francisco, and nearby places, so practically the entire 
picture will be made here. Ernest Traxler, production manager, and 
Capt. Richard Day, art director for Goldwyn, are also in town get- 
ting locations, and arranging production details. Though it is thirty 
years since Frank Norris wrote the book, and the original house 
where McTeague was supposed to have lived at Bush and Polk 
streets was destroyed in the fire, they have had the unusual luck 
of find many of the other scenes absolutely as they were in Mr. 
Norris' own day, so the picture will be wonderfully true to life. 



Horses work up to their necks in the waters of the lower Columbu 
River, Oregon, drawing the great seines with the catches of tons of 
salmon. Many of the animals have little hair left. Immersion in 
salt water seems to kill it. 



ART EXHIBIT AT THE BOHEMIAN CLUB 

A particularly interesting art exhibit will open Monday, January 
29 at the Bohemian Club, closing February 10. The hours are 
from 2:30 until 5:30 p. m.. It will also be open from 7:30 to 
10 p. m. on Saturday. February 10. There will be a private view 
for members and their guests on Saturday evening. January 27. 

The exhibit will consist of etchings, sculpture and paintings by 
numerous local artists, among them the following: 

Homer Ansley, Arthur Beckwith. A. W. Best. Ray Boynton. 
Ferdinand BurgdorfT. Arthur Cahill. Earl Cummings. Chas. J. Dick- 
man. Maynard Dixon, John M. Gamble. Clarke Hobart. C. A. Jor- 
gensen. L. P. Latimer. Haig Patigan. F. J. McComas, Chas. Rollo 
Peters, Mateo Sandona. Theodore Wores, and many others. The 
hanging committee consists of the following: H. S. Fonda. C A. 
Jorgensen. Spencer Mackay. James Swinnerton and Arthur Beck- 
with. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 27, 1923 




mm 



'Har&Gxr<Hbt>llrJn-l*i Urn'' 
'Ooe&tlwiltfkf (Aedkn/Mr.iaAjiK 

— I wonder if we could find a Mussolini in San Francisco should 
the occasion demand. And the occasion does demand a man who 
at least can speak out on the espionage and pussy footing that 
goes on in the city until one's liberty of action is a matter far 
removed from the realm of reality. Mrs. Gerould, in an article in 
the Harper's Magazine for this month on "Freedom on the land of 
the Free," shows how far we have retrograded from our former 
attitude on individual liberty and contrasts us, much to our det- 
riment, with our Canadian neighbors. But in the course of the arti- 
cle she refers to San Franciscans as the only Americans who walk 
the streets with an air of happiness and some approach to human 
dignity. She attributes this apparent absence of conspicuous thral- 
dom to the generosity of our climate which removes so many fetters 
from our freedom of physical movement. We had not noticed it. 
On the contrary those of us who have spent our lives here are more 
struck with the comparatively preoccupied and heavily laden air of 
our fellow townsmen. If we are superior, what about the others? 
Oh, for some one who would stand up and say what is in him and 
shame the devil, some one who does not fear the hostility which 
such freedom brings. We have had them in our day but now we 
are confronted with a barren acquiescence, the most debilitating 
of public qualities. Next to the rule of the mob the morals of the 
mob are more depressing and degrading, and we are under the 
moral compulsion of the mob. 

— Now for the suggested improvement of Market street, which, 
according to Mayor Rolph and the Civic League Improvement 
Clubs, should have four blocks, from Jones to Van Ness, removed 
in order to complete the civic center. Of course that means com- 
mercial loss — there is no doubt at all about that. But does it mean 
artistic gain? That depends upon the carrying out of the idea. 
Commercial loss can and often is offset by artistic gain so that 
commercial gain actually follows. And the opportunities for the 
cultivation of esthetic values in a growing city are rare and fleeting. 
We lost the wonderful boulevard which Mr. Phelan had designed 
and the measure of our loss is only just beginning to make itself 
felt. We don't pretend to settle the question, but one thing is certain, 
and that is that our worthy mayor will never let purely esthetic values 
destroy his sense of commercial proportion. 

— Why does Judge Graham yearn for the federal bench? He 
occupies such a position in the community that he can never hope 
to duplicate in the cold isolation of that particular glacial chamber 
where sit the judges who preside over the interests of justice in 
the federal courts. To see him mount the city hall steps in the 
morning or come down them in the evening is a sight worth going 
out to see. Such an air of genialty, such a handshaking, such laugh- 
ter, such gales of boisterous fun as are seldom heard in the purlieus 
of the judgment-factories. And then to think of the grim, stiff 
primness of those clean corridors in the post office building, of 
the stolid correctness of its denizens, of the low voiced mirthless 
conversation. I don't know how anyone so human can even think 
of transferring himself to so polar a climate. 

— Frank P. Deering the other day, in a speech to the Bar As- 
sociation, made a very clever statement of the difficulties that await 
a speaker who is at one and the same time charged with the duty 
of speeding the departing incumbents and welcoming the incoming 



successors. How would it do to say, he asked, "Tis better to endure 
the ills we have than to fly to others that we know not of." Judge 
Sullivan, to whom he suggested that method of treating the matter, 
was vehement in his disapproval. But leave it to Deering for social 
cleverness. He made an excellent speech which pleased all parties 
and actually seemed to satisfy the departing justices. At least 
Justice Shurtleff expressed his satisfaction at again being a mem- 
ber of the bar. Here again one is tempted to ask, is the satisfaction 
of Judge Shurtleff also regarded with general satisfaction? 

— What is back of this new sensation that is agitating the town 
on the narcotic question? Probably nothing more than the love 
of excitement which must find new horrors on which to expatiate. 
That there is a narcotic question nobody will deny. But that the 
school children are affected in the proportion of more than 50 per 
cent, as stated by a legislator in Sacramento, is a cruel and inex- 
cusable lie. To harrow the public with such stories is a diabolical 
work and the short-haired sisters and hysterical preachers who 
gratify their starved souls with sensational atrocity should be met 
by an inflexible public demand for the actual facts. There is noth- 
ing like a fact for sticking a sensationalist. 

— Among all the questions raised by the Quartr'z Art ball is the 
one. Why did Harry Lafler's crowd come as goats? All sorts of 
answers have been given, some of them rather more worthy of the 
Paris background than belonging to our sedate society. But after 
all what more appropriate disguise could have been found for the 
denizens of Telegraph Hill, where the goats dispute possession with 
Harry Lafler himself? Goats and wine and the revelry of the artists 
are the main distinction of the Telegraph Hill group. But the goat 
girls, that is something else. No wonder the artists like Telegraph 
Hill if they can be herded by such loveliness. Who would not be 
a goat, actually or merely imitative, under such conditions? 



The Mother Goose 
Confections 

Here is Something a I^ew! 

A confection made of California's most 
perfect fruits and berries, scientifically pro- 
cessed, chocolate-coated or "candied" in 
their own jnices. 

The natural sugar of the fruits produces a 
PERFECT Candy. 

Dipped in chocolate perpetuates the nat- 
ural exquisite flavor and fragrance. 

ioo Varieties, jc to $1.50 Each 

< ine pound box by mail postpaid, $1.00. 

Send a box to your eastern friends. 

Visit our Art Gallery of Mother Goose 
paintings by Chas. A. Holland, the world's 
famed artist. 

^Mother Qoose Confection Co., Inc. 

1214 Market St., San Francisco 



»»M;»!IM»!l!H 



XXXh :: h m :: it's'";* 



January 27, 1923 AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER II 

r. :■.:■. r. S it n :: g :: v. :: x »«BBHHBBBS@SBBBH>tBBBBBB81MBBBBBBBBBBBBBS8BBH[§HHBSSBEHBBBBBSBHBH[>3l 

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The French Art Exhibition ! ▼ 

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IBBSBHBBBSSHBBBBHaBHBSBBBaSBEHBBBHBiaHBBBaSSBBMBSBBBBBBHBgBaSBaBBBKHBBBBBeaBBSBBBslBHBBBBBBBBJl 




(EDITOR'S NOTE — San Francisco has never been favored before New York in the matter 
of exhibitions, especially as regards such a one now taking place at the auditorium. M. d'Oelsnitz, 
who is in charge, brought his collection of paintings and sculpture first to the Orient from 
Pai-is. because he had traveled in the Orient and knew its possibilities, and from the Orient, 
San Francisco loomed in view as the nearest great American city. That is why we have 
been fortunate enough to secure this symposium of art in advance of any other city in America.) 




FTER the appearance of the impressionists in the 19th 
century, as represented by Dracroix, Courbet, Monet, 
Pissarro, Sisley and Renoir, a new school appeared 
known as the neo-impressionists. After that, many isms 
have followed, including cubism, futurism, similtanism and dada- 
ism. There also arose a coterie of artists who opposed the style of 
the impressionists which, they declare, is not in keeping with com- 
position. Artists like Raphael, Ingre and David seek their stand- 
point on classics and they are known as the neo-classic school. 
Then there came the naturalists who try to depict nature in its 
simple, unadorned color. Since 
the death of Soula and Cross, 
the neo-impressionists are 
barely maintained in existence 
by Signac; Picasso has dis- 
carded cubism and become an 
ardent realist, while the tot- 
tering citadel of futurism is 
barely held by a section of 
Italian artists. Even Matis is 
now devoting his keen power 
of observation to the modern 
style of delineation. In fact, 
it appears to be simply a ques- 
tion of time how long the 
naturalists are going to last. 
Among the last of the im- 
pressionists may be mentioned 
Henri Lebasque, and George 
d'Espagnat. The former is 
versatile in his art and de- 
picts all sorts of things in 
brilliant color scheme. 
D'Espagnat's productions are 
beautiful, but compared with 
Renoir they lack clear, pene- 
trating power of observation 
and nothing more than a sim- 
ple, objective expression. 

Roussel and Waroquier may 
be described as nostalgic ar- 
tists. The former excels in 
delineating subjects of grace- 
ful, ancient classic stories, 
while the latter's favorite sub- 
ject appears to be rough, rugged scenes of primitive suggestion 
Waroquier's works suggest much of Oriental taste. Among the 
artists of the decorative inclination may be enumerated Bonnard. 
Vuillard, Guerin. \ alt.it. Flandrin and Manzana-Pissarro, while 
Maurice Denis excels in depicting decorative paintings of religious 
subjects. Bonnard seems to be at home on all sorts of subjects, 
both animate and inanimate, and although the gray silver used by 




Call to Arms 



him is apt to impart a feeling of coldness, it is so cleverly used that 
it contains internal warmth. All his works are beautifully delightful. 
Vuillard possesses some resemblance to Bonnard in the use of 
colors, but however he may excel in his power of observation, he 
can hardly surpass Bonnard in the judicious use of colors. Guerin's 
style has two sides. One is the delineation of nature and the other 
is a manifestation of highly decorative taste as that which may 
be witnessed in the walls of palaces. 

Flandrin's favorite subject appears to be extensive landscape, 
rich in panoramic taste. Manzana-Passarro uses gold and silver to 

heighten a decorative effect. 
Maurice Denis in his work on 
a religious subject scored suc- 
cess in heightening a decora- 
tive effect in the judicious use 
of colors. 

Among the artists belong- 
ing to the naturalist school 
whose works are exhibited in 
this exhibition may be men- 
tioned Marquet. Asselin. Ca- 
moin, Dumont, Manguin, Pi- 
cart-le-Doux and Vlaminck. 
Of these men. Marquet may 
be said as scoring success in 
his efforts to simplify com- 
plicated natur- from an ob- 
jective standpoint. Asselin is 
depicting men and nature with 
a comparatively serious obser- 
vation. Manguin pays care- 
ful attention to the contrast 
of colors and seems to be ca- 
pable of good as well as in- 
different productions. 

It is a matter of satisfac- 
tion that the exhibition con- 
tain? in addition to the works 
of the impressionist school, 
artist.;' work of Odilon Redon. 
His favorite subjects seem to 
be mysterious fancies and his 
paintings possess beautiful 
points that charm. At the 
same time it is regrettable that 
works of Picasso were not represented in the exhibition. Gen- 
erally speaking, however, the promoters of the exhibition must 
be congratulated upon having shown to San Francisco such ex- 
cellent French works of art which, both in quantity and quality, 
surpass anything ever exhibited before in our city, and for which our 
artists, art patrons and the general public of the bay district should 
be grateful. 



12 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

gg|gWK«g>S^ggiaKllgHlg«giMMIuni«i^ 

The Birth of a New Art 

:i«i»hw a a a a a «"a»S'*S a H'.k ?■«'» aw aa a >'< a » a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a : 



January 27, 1923 




By OTTORINO D. RONCHI 




lime. 



JiRT today is thrilling with creative strength. It desires 
to say what has never been said before, and is not 
afraid that its first words may be crude and ineffectual. 
It knows that it will gain fluency of expression with 
for it knows what it would say. The pioneers of the modern 
movement in art are artists who were born in France or have 
worked there. 

And this is natural. Since the end of the seventeenth century 
France has taken the lead in the visual arts, which Italy held glor- 
iously till that time, and even since the early part of the nineteenth 
Paris has been the artistic capital of the world. 




i lomei gue 



qA 'Parisian 



The great stream of living art in the twentieth century came from 
France, and the main current from Paris sweeps in everybody with 
Cezanne at the prow, Matisse, Picasso. Derain, Lhote, Laprade, 
Chabaud, Maillot on board; Manet, Monet, Sisley, Pissarro, Degas, 
Renoir and Rodin waving you from the shore. Corot, Millet, Cour- 
bet not so far behind, and even Ingres and Delacroix still in plain 
sight. 

Two generations of painters since the stormy Courbet's early 
works in the middle of the past century, had kept to the naturalistic 
point of view. This naturalism had found its highest development 
in impressionism. 




The Chaise-Longue 



L<-h;tS!|li.- 



Cezanne was the genius who, at the end of the eighties, led the 
way, slowly and steadily and with irresistible daring, away from 
the old paths. After him the whole sky and aspect of visual art 
have changed like a familiar scene in the glamor of a new day. 

Exhibitions of modern painting have multiplied in the east within 
the last few years, but only now is it possible for San Francisco to 
have a "retrospective" modern show. It has been made possible 
by the efforts of M. H. d'Oelsnitz of Paris. 

The extraordinarily interesting assemblage began with Gustave 
Courbet and ends with the neo-classic Jean Marchand, who is hailed 
as the new leader and master of the art of today in France. 




The Card Game 



G. d'Esuagnal 



January 27, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



Names well known, all of the modern schools, are here in a rep- 
resentative gathering. They are names of painters, masters and 
disciples, all united by the strong and pliable race thread of the 
artistic French genius; the belief that there is beauty common to 





The Table Near the Window 

life and art; the sincerity; the refined taste, the quest of humane 
beauty; the sense of balance; the pure and fresh love of nature 
and spiritual grace. 

Even a cursory survey of the exhibition is impossible here. ^ ou 
cannot review, with a few words, the canvases of Lucien Simon, 



Tulips 

the last representative of the school of "plein art"; or those of Rene 
Menard, so filled with romantic traditions; or those of Gaston 
Latcuche, one of the most racial painters of France; or those of 
the pellucid Chavannes; or those of Redon in which he gives full 




] •£■*? 




1A ' tr^^"^^ <i^^r^ ^ 


H^^^ ~^^^^^^^^^E 3ha 


$r 


tr 



Mil! till 



The c Pergola 



Snow Scene 

play, without rhyme or reascn in the logic of every day. to a rich 
and pliant imagination: or those of Renoir, who is French as French 
can be; or those of Cezanne, who is the god of the moderns as he 
is the anathema to academicians; or those of Matisse, the blessed. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 27, 1923 



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'Banks of the Seine Near Rouen 



Lebourg 



with extraordinary sensibility; or those of Picasso, the sorcerer of 
art; or those of the mystic Denis; or those of Bourdelle who always 
carries one away because there is a swing and a spirituality in his 
magnificent thought and work, unique in modern sculpture; or 
all of those other artists, old or "jeunes," expressing all the age- 
old "esprit francais." 

A great moral lesson emanates from this exhibition. It applies 
directly to our "older" artists who are usually meant when the 
term "academician" is used. The works of the "since-Cezanne- 
artists" are for the young who are warned that to be great one 
must be earnest and not copyists. 

The works of Besnard, La Touche, Simon, Carriere, Menard, are 
for those artists who are not doing their jobs with the thorough- 
ness of these Frenchmen. 

Undoubtedly the genesis of the new year in art in San Francisco 
is marked by an event of unusually felicitous significance by this 
display of modern French art. It represents the art of yesterday, 
and cf today. Moreover, in it is the dawn of the art of tomorrow. 



■ 





Saints (?) and Sinners (?) 

By "CHEERFUL CYNIC" 

MANY, many vears ago the late Cardinal Newman stirred the 
dove-cctes by a statement that he would give more for. the 
chance of a drunken old woman, even what we call "immoral as 
a candidate for a corner in heaven, than for the paragon of prudery 
and piety, whose venom-tipped tongue is the terror of the com- 
munity in which she lives. 

An awful thing, surely, for a dignitary of the church to say- 
that a lover of the cup and of many men might be more acceptable 
to St. Michael (whose sympathy with the erring could not be ex- 
pected to equal that of St. Peter), than the protagonist of physical 
purity, devoted to "good works," who carries always in her pocket 
(and never misses an opportunity of using) a Carrie Nation hammer 
for the destruction of any tendencies of her neighbor that may 
offend her sanctimonious sense of the fitting. 

How many of us have amused ourselves throwing into the sea 
pebble after pebble, comparing the size and perfection of the swiftly 
widening circles, result of the impact? Gossip is like that, if it 
be malicious. "In strict confidence" of course one "good woman" 
tells another that she does not know, but she has heard, etc. Or 
that she wonders why, or that it does seem queer. Her hearer re- 
peats the "mere nothing" with embellishments to a third party, as 
holy as herself. The serpentine writhings of the foul reptile Hearsay, 
continue, its slimy trail grows, withering all it encounters. Gath- 
ering encouragement from the winks, uplifted eyebrows, and acid 
smiles with which its progress is received, its movements increased 
in force and intensity until it strikes some cowering object that 
lies across its path and, thrilled with the evidence of its power to 
kill, it flames into frenzy, each fresh victim affording a new stim- 
ulus. Nothing, finally, daring to venture within its reach, even a 
Sir Galahad were not immune to the poison it emits. 

We execute the man who, under the influence of a long-cher- 
ished feeling of jealously or hate, takes another's life, our view 
being that his continued existence is a danger to society. What is 
the menace contained in such a man's existence compared with 
that which overhangs every one of us, every day, every hour, every 
minute, so long as the malicious retailer of idle words is permitted 
to encumber the earth? The offense of the man whom we, in self- 
defense, translate to another sphere, is as a drop of water to the 
ocean, measured against the tattler's sins against heaven. How 
many thousands have been and are daily sent to their death, after 
years often of a lingering torture worse than death, by the slow 
infiltration into their system of the tale-bearer's lethal drugs? Of 
the sufferings of these we hear but htt'e, yet their silent murmurs 
clamor for vengeance in a place where the goody-goody will ever 
encounter barred gates. 

Was the cardinal so far wrong? Is it difficult to understand why 
there should be more rejoicing among the angels over one sinner 
that repenteth than there can ever be over the many (self) right- 
eous who may seem to need no repentance? 



E. Louis Gillot 



c Ne r w York 



— I wonder what is going to be done about the condition of 
things down at the embarcadero. The roads are shocking. It is 
impossible to cross them without danger and in the wet weather 
one must flounder through with the mud splashing to the knees. I 
don't think that any town of importance has so wretched an ap- 
proach. True enough the bridge has helped a little, but the bridge 
can only accommodate those of the commuters who arrive upstairs. 
As for the mass that have to flounder through deep mud. exposed 
to the onslaughts of speeding trucks and twisting street cars; their 
position is desperate and dangerous. The responsible officials should 
be made to run the gauntlet of the traffic twice a day till they see 
the error of their ways. 



January 27. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 




A JANUARY BOOK CHAT 

By KEM 

"Books, books that I love so. 

Poetry . . . fairy-tales . . . stories; 

All of them together make one huge book, 

Broad as a mountain, 

With golden pages 

And pictures of long ago. 

I read and I read ... of living ... of thoughts . . . 

Of queer things people tell; 

If I could I would buy that huge book. 

All the world in one! 

But it cannot be bought 

For one penny or two." 

— Frpm Shoes of the Wind by Hilda Conkling (Stokes)— $1 .60. 

One would need the eight-year old rapture of a Hilda Conkling 
to get up much enthusiasm over January books. It is between sea- 
sons in the book world, but the clerks are glad to show you the 
following 1922 books which are still much in demand: 

* * * 

THE COVERED WAGON, by Emerson Hough, an unusually in- 
teresting outdoor story. Fair Harbor, one of Joseph Lincoln's fa- 
mous Cape Cod stories, and Abbe Pierre — the Cascony classic by 
Jay Hudson. All Appleton Co. books. — $2. 

THE ASHES OF ACHIEVEMENT, by Frank A. Russell, an Aus- 
tralian novel that won the prize for being the best novel of the year 
published in Australia, is a story of Melbourne and Sydney of uni- 
versity and society life there and not of the bush, and has found 

many admirers here. Brentana. — $1.90. 

* * * 

THE SINGING CAPTIVES, by E. B. C. Jones, a finished Eng- 
lish story, and MY AMERICAN DIARY, by Clare Sheridan. Boni. 

Liverwright. — $2. 

* ¥ * 

THE JUDGE, by Rebecca West, and THE CATHEDRAL, by Hugh 
Walpole, unquestionably two of the very outstanding novels of the 

year. Doran. — $2.50. 

* * * 

JOANNA GODDEN, by Sheila Kaye-Smith, the story of a big- 
hearted, whole-souled primitive woman whom the reader can't for- 
get, and who will win many new adherents to the writer who has 

the "really-truly" story-teller's gift. Dutton — $2. 

* * * 

ROUGH HEWN, by Dorothy Canfield. It is the story of two peo- 
ple destined for each other. The girl surrounded by the sophistica- 
tions of modern life abroad, who throws herself into music as a 
refuge until she meets the young man who has grown up in America 
and who has come a-seeking for the spark that will "make life 
start." The contrast of French home life with the honesty of Ameri- 
can life given with Dorothy Canfield's art will intrigue the reader 
who likes to see work well done. Harcourt, Brace and Howe. — $2. 

* * * 

THE SPINSTER OF THIS PARISH, by W. B. Maxwell; Clair de 
Lune, by Anthony Pryde, and Pippin, by Archibald Marshall, who 
writes such charming English County family stories, are still very 



much in demand. The Dust of the Desert, by Robert Welles Rit- 
chie — a Mexican story by a local writer — is still not forgotten. 
Dodd Mead & Co.— $2. 

ATOLLS OF THE SUN, by Frederick O'Brien, is holding all his 
old-time admirers and winning new ones, for all eyes continue to 
gaze towards the South Seas and Mr. O'Brien's word pictures of 
the enchanted islands are alluring and enlightening as well. — Cen- 
tury. — $5. 

FOR RICHER, FOR POORER, by Harold Armstrong, a modern 
American story of love and marriage told in an interesting, clean, 
forceful manner, and THE BRIGHT SHAWL, by Joseph Herger- 
sheimer, a novel much in the style of his earlier works, are still 
much called for. Knopf. — $2. 

Any of the books mentioned above may be obtained at the Paul 
Elder Company. 



A new device, consisting of conductor wires submerged in the 
channels of New York Harbor, enables liners to guide themselves 
safely through to port. Sensitive wires slung over the vessel's side 
and trailed below the surface, serve to communicate a buzzing sound 
to the bridge when the vessel is safely in mid-channel. 



Short skirts, short sleeves, low necks and high heels in feminine 
apparel have caused several Swiss insurance companies, which insure 
against illness, to raise their premiums 15 per cent for women. 



The Sacramento 
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— Comfortable steam-heated 

coaches. 
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— Buffet club car. 

Only three and a quarter 
hours to 




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LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 27, 1923 




ociot 



ay 



BUSY CUPID 

LONG-CONVERSE — Miss Olivia Long, the attractive daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Long of Santa Barbara, who was a recent 
visitor in San Francisco, will become the bride of Mr. George 
Converse at the home of her parents on East Pedregosa street, 
Friday, February 2. They will leave immediately after the 
ceremony for New York, from which city they will sail Feb- 
ruary 10 on the Olympic for Switzerland. During her stay 
in San Francisco Miss Long was the guest of her grandmother. 
Mrs. Aaron Milton Burns. Mr. Converse is the son of Mrs. 
Antoinette Converse of New York, who is passing the winter 
in Santa Barbara, where she is occupying the Perkins house. 
Mrs. Converse will accompany her son and his bride abroad. 

BARUCH-LILIENTHAL — An interesting engagement announced 
Monday is that of Miss Frances Baruch and Mr. Theodore 
Lilienthal. Miss Baruch is the daughter of Mr. Frederick 
Baruch, well known capitalist. She is a tall, blonde, athletic 
young woman, immensely attractive and very popular. Mr. 
Lilienthal is the son of the late Philip Lilienthal Sr., and a 
brother of Philip Lilienthal of this city, and Mrs. Veer of 
New York. Both of the Lilienthal brothers are connected with 
the Anglo Bank. 

LINKINS-CUPPLES — An engagement that is being told inform- 
ally to intimate friends is that of Mrs. May Deussing Linkins 
to Mr. Leslie Cupples. Mrs. Linkins is the younger daughter 
of Mrs. George Hamlin Fitch and a sister of Mrs. William 
Arnold Aldrich. Mr. Cupples is the son of Mr. and Mrs. D. 
L. Cupples. The wedding of the couple is planned for some 
time during the spring. 

DILLINGHAM-SQUIER — Announcement is made of the marriage 
of Mrs. Julia Dillingham, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Dillingham, to Mr. George F. Squier of New York, which was 
an event of Saturday, January 20. Following their honey- 
moon in Southern California, Mr. and Mrs. Squier will make 
their home in San Francisco. Mrs. Squier's father was for 
twenty-five years in the American consular service abroad. 
Her only brother is Mr. Matthew Dillingham, whose marriage 
with Mrs. Helen Johnson Emerich was an event of a few 
weeks ago. 

ALDEN-SCOVEL — Dr. and Mrs. B. F. Alden announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter, Victoria Lucille Alden, to Ralph 
Edwin Scovel, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Scovel. The news 
was told at a luncheon given by Mrs. Alden and Miss Alden 
on Saturday. Both families are well known about the bay, 
Dr. Alden being one of the leading physicians of this city. 
Miss Alden will be graduated from a finishing school this 
spring. Young Scovel is a student at the University of Cali- 
fornia. 

BUCKBEE-BOYDEN — Miss Margaret Buckbee, who is to become 
the bride of John Boyden on April 3, has chosen her bridal 
attendants, who will include Miss Fay Boyden, sister of the 
bridegroom, as maid of honor; Mrs. John Knox (Laura Lind- 
say), Miss Katherine Bentley, Miss Geraldine Grace, Miss 
Helen Perkins, Miss Laura Currey, Miss Julia Van Fleet, Mrs. 
Hugh Porter and Miss Mary Julia Crocker. Arthur Merrill 
Brown Jr. will be best man. 

LOWNEY-ALFERITZ — Mr. and Mrs. D. D. Lowney announce the 
engagement of their daughter, Miss Dorothy Ann Lowney, 
to George H. P. Alferitz, son of Mrs. Arthur Owen and grand- 
son of the late Peter Alferitz, pioneer wool merchant of this 
city. The news was told on Saturday at a large bridge tea 
at the Lowney home on Masonic street. 

HOPKINS-POND — The marriage of Miss Hopkins and Mr. Pond 
will be an event of this Saturday. It will be an afternoon 
wedding at the home of the bride's mother, Mrs. Sherwood 
Hopkins, and will be attended only by relatives and a few 
close friends. Mrs. William Gregory Parrott, the former Miss 
Gertrude Hopkins, will be the matron of honor and the bride's 
only attendant. Mr. Henry Howard will be the best man and 
the ushers will be the bride's brother, Mr. William Sherwood 
Hopkins, Mr. William Gregory Parrott, Mr. Elliott McAllister 
Jr., Mr. Kenneth Mcintosh, Mr. Charles Pond, brother of the 
bridegroom, and Mr. Russell Wilson. Following their mar- 
riage Mr. Pond and his bride will make their home in San 
Mateo. Mr. Pond has taken an attractive residence in the 
Hayward tract near the site of the old Peninsula hotel. 



VAN NESS-DENMAN — Announcement is made of the engage- 
ment of Miss Clara Van Ness, daughter of Frank McC. Van 
Ness, to Macdonald Denman. Miss Van Ness informed a few 
of her most intimate friends of her engagement by means of 
personal notes, received in the mail Tuesday. The bride- 
elect is the granddaughter of Mrs. Thomas C. Van Ness, and 
the niece of Mrs. William Denman and Thomas C. Van Ness 
Jr. Miss Leslie Van Ness is her sister. Macdonald Denman 
is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Mark A. Denman of Springfield, 
Mass. The wedding date has not been set. 
HARRISON-LECK — Miss Agnes Harrison has set February 21 
as- the date for her marriage to Mr. Hallock Vander Leek of 
Los Angeles. The other details are not yet quite determined 
and in the meantime the bride-elect is being feted at a series 
of delightful affairs. 

LUNCHEONS 
SMITH — Mrs. Reginald Knight Smith entertained at an informal 
luncheon Tuesday afternoon at her home in Pierce street. 
Accepting her hospitality were Mrs. Charles Stetson Wheeler, 
Mrs. Wendell Hammon, Mrs. John A. Wright, Mrs. Jack 
Wright, Mrs. Ray Lyman Wilbur, Mrs. James Denman, Mrs. 
Ferdinand Stephenson and Mrs. Charles Holbrook. 
WALKER — Mr. and Mrs. Willis Walker were hosts at a small 
luncheon Monday afternoon, when they entertained in honor 
of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Colt of New York. The party was 
held in the fable room of the Hotel St. Francis. 
MORTON — Mrs. Charles G. Morton will be the guest of honor at 
a luncheon party to be given on February S at the Palace 
hotel, with Mrs. I. W. Lowenberg as hostess. 
ALLEN — Mrs. Herbert Allen gave a luncheon for the debutantes 
at her home Tuesday afternoon, and Wednesday the same 
coterie were entertained at luncheon by Mrs. Nion Tucker, 
who gave the affair for two New York buds, Miss Carol Shaw 
and Miss Mary Forbes, who are house guests of the Joseph 
Olive Tobins. Later Miss Shaw and Miss Forbes will visit 
Mr. and Mrs. George T. Cameron. 
DARGIE — In honor of Mrs. William E. Dargie, who has recently 
returned to San Francisco after several years' absence, Mr. 
and Mrs. Adolph Spreckels entertained at a luncheon on Sun- 
day at their home in Washington street. During Mrs. Dargie's 
absence she made an extended stay in South America and the 
latter part of her time was passed in Europe. Since her re- 
turn she has-been the incentive for a number of informal en- 
tertainments. 
PARROTT — One of the affairs of interest given on the peninsula 
on Saturday was the luncheon at which Mrs. William Gregory 
Parrott presided at her Burlingame home. The guests included 
a number of the younger contingent of San Francisco and the 
peninsula, many of whom motored down from town for the 
occasion. 
ST. FRANCIS — Most of the groups at luncheon in the Garden 
and Fable room of the Hotel St. Francis this week were small 
but many of the fashionable folk were there despite the rainy 
weather. Mrs. Daniel C. .Tackling, Mrs. Thomas Eastland, 
Mrs. Eugene Murphy, Mrs. Walter Filer and Mrs. Ross Ambler 
Curran were a congenial group at one of the cozy tables in 
the Garden. Mrs. Filer wore an especially attractive wrap 
of grey caracul with a collar of blue fox. Mrs. Ritchie Dunn 
was hostess to a group that included Miss Celia O'Connor, 
Mrs. R. P. Schwerin and Mrs. George de Latour. Ex-Senator 
Phelan was with a small group including Mrs. Arthur Rose 
Vincent, who has just returned from abroad, and Mrs. J. 
Downey Harvey. 




Under the guidance of R. H. Collins and his as- 
sociates, the Peerless was bound to be a better 
and better Peerless. The public response came 
quickly and is indicated by augmented sales in old 
Peerless strongholds and throughout the country 
in general. 

Pioneer Motor Company 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

1900 Van Ness Ave., Corner Washington St. 
Telephone Prospect 8800 



January 27, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



ALLEN — Mrs. Herbert Allen assembled a small group of the 
season's debutantes at luncheon at her home on Broadway 
Tuesday afternoon. 

PRATT — One of the several informal luncheons on Tuesday's 
calendar was the affair at which Mrs. Orville Pratt enter- 
tained at the Francesca Club. 

LAW — Mrs. Harold Law was hostess at a delightful luncheon 
at her home on Broadway in honor of Mrs. Edgar Peixotto, 
who is leaving for Europe. There were twelve guests. The 
table was attractively decorated with spring flowers. 

SCHWERIN — Polo was all that was talked of Sunday in Hills- 
borough, San Mateo and Burlingame, where party after party 
was held in honor of the visiting and local teams, who pro- 
vided the sport of the hour. The largest of the parties was 
the luncheon at which Mrs. Rennie Pierre Schwerin enter- 
tained at the San Mateo Polo Club in honor of her house 
guests, the members of the Monterey team. This quartet in- 
cludes her son, Mr. Will Crocker, Mr. Eric Pedley and Mr. 
Harry Hunt. Forty guests accepted Mrs. Schwerin's hospi- 
tality. 

TEAS 

MAY — Mrs. Margaret C. May entertained almost a hundred of 
her friends at a most enjoyable musicale tea in the Borgia 
room of the Hotel St. Francis on Saturday. A pleasant sur- 
prise to the guests was the musical program that was given 
by Mrs. May and her two daughters, Mrs. John Baker and 
Mrs. Roger Lennon. 

HENSHAW — Mrs. Tyler Henshaw was assisted by her daughter, 
Mrs. Pearl Cawston Fillmore, at a tea given at the Henshaw 
home on Vernon Heights, Oakland, Wednesday. 

CROFTON-CEBRIAN — Mrs. Algernon Crofton and Mrs. Louis de 
Laveaga Cebrian gave a tea on Thursday to meet the Countess 
Annseley. The tea was at the Crofton home in West Clay Park. 
BRIDGE 

FENNIMORE — Mrs. Arthur Fennimore entertained at a bridge 
and man jongg party at her home Wednesday evening. 
DINNERS 

TAYLOR — Mr. and Mrs. Augustus Taylor entertained Wednes- 
day evening at their home in this city. 

PORTER — Mrs. William S. Porter gave a dinner at her home 
in Jackson street on Thursday evening. Members of the young 
married contingent were entertained. 

SCHWABACHER — The dinner given on Saturday evening in 
honor of Mrs. Ludwig Schwabacher by her sons, James and 
Albert Schwabacher. at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. James 
Schwabacher on Washington street, was a most delightful 
entertainment. 

WHEELER — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Stetson Wheeler are enter- 
taining at a series of dinner parties at their home in Wash- 
ington street. Tuesday evening they entertained sixteen 
guests at dinner and again were hosts on Friday evening. 

NORRIS — Major and Mrs. Charles Gilman Norris gave a dinner 
dance at the Bohemian Club on Saturday night in honor of 
their niece. Miss Jeanette Norris. daughter of the late Frank 
Norris. She will return to her home at Medford. Ore., shortly, 
accompanied by her cousin, Miss Josephine Drown. 

MOFFITT — Wednesday evening Dr. and Mrs. Herbert C. Motrin 
gave a dinner dance for a group of the friends of their daugh- 
ter, Miss Alice Moffltt. 

DIBBLEE — Mrs. Benjamin Dibblee gave a dinner dance at the 
Palace hotel on Friday evening, having as her guest of honor 
her granddaughter, Miss Isabel Sherman, daughter of Mrs. 
Harry M. Sherman. 

LOWERY — Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Lowery entertained at a de- 
lightful dinner at their home on Pierce street Tuesday. 

SPRECKELS — Preceding the Cameron-Tobin dance Miss Eleanor 
Spreckels will entertain at a dinner, later attending the party 
with her guests. 

DROWN-MOORE — Miss Josephine Drown and Miss Mary Ber- 
nice Moore, will be dinner hostesses before the Cameron- 
Tobin party. 

LANDERS — Mrs. John Landers celebrated her husband's eighty- 
second birthday with a dinner last Sunday evening at then- 
home in Octavia street. On January 111 Mr. and Mrs. Landers 
will celebrate the fifty-sixth anniversary of their marriage. 



MORSE — Mr. and Mrs. Samuel F. B. Morse gave a large buffet 
supper at their home in Burlingame tor the polo set Sunday 
evening. 

DIBBLEE — Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Dibblee were dinner hosts Mon- 
day evening at their San Rafael home. 

CROCKER — A number of dinner parties are being planned before 
the bachelors' ball, which will be given at the San Francisco 
Golf and Country Club on the evening of February 9. Among 
those who are planning dinners to be given before the dance 
are Miss Julia Crocker and her brother, Harry J. Crocker. 
The party will be given in honor of the little group of the 
winter's buds and will be held at the home of the young 
hostess and host in Laguna street. 

FULLER — Preceding the January dance of the Friday Evening 
Assemblies, Miss Margaret Fuller, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank W. Fuller, entertained at a large dinner at the Wo- 
man's Athletic Club. The party was given for Miss Kate 
Boardman, who, with her mother, Mrs. T. Danforth Board- 
man, will leave on February 1 for Europe. 

RICHELIEU — On Friday evening a new idea in dinner dansants 
was given. During the evening all of those present who wished 
to do so participated in a tryout before a camera. A director, 
camera and light man filmed the contestants and there is no 
telling but what another star or perhaps several will be dis- 
covered. During the evening there was a musical program. 
Mr. Edgerly Richards and Mr. Nazzerno Regoli rendered solos 
and duets. 

IN TOWN AND OUT 

MOORE — Mr. and Mrs. George Gordon Moore are home again 
in their San Mateo residence after an extended visit in the 
east. They had planned to leave here in the autumn to go 
to Europe before returning to California, but they changed 
their minds on their arrival on the Atlantic Coast, and the 
old world sojourn has been indefinitely postponed. 

ELKINS — Mrs. Felton Elkins is going to spend the week end in 
Montecito as the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Courtney, and 
she will remain over for the Fleischmann ball in the south- 
ern city on Tuesday. 

TEVIS — After an enjoyable visit in Burlingame with Mr. Wil- 
liam S. Tevis Sr., Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Tevis have returned' 
to their home in Los Angeles. 

KINGSBURY — Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth R. Kingsbury took their 
departure Wednesday for the Atlantic Coast, where, after 
a several weeks' stay, they will return home by way of the 
Panama canal. 

NERNEY — Mrs. Stephen Nerney and her small son, Stephen Ner- 
ney, who have been visiting Mrs. Nerney's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. William L. Hughson. at their home at the Hotel Rich- 
elieu, returned to their home in Los Angeles Friday. 

KIERULFF — Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Kierulff and their son, Edgar 
Kierulff, are being greeted upon their return from abroad. 
They are at the kierulff home on Broderick street. 
INTIMATIONS 

NORRIS — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Oilman Norris gave a small 
theater and supper party for then- niece, Miss Jeannette Nor- 
ris. on Thursday evening. 

JACKL1NC. — The Daniel C. JackllngS have scut out invitations for 
a motor picnic and barbecue, which they will give in the 
Woodside foothills on Sunday. They have asked the debutante 
set to be their guests. 

DIBBLEE — Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Dibblee "f Santa Barbara are 
receiving the congratulations of their many friends on the 
birth of a son. the fourth child in the family. 

PHELAN — Former Senator James D. Phelan gave a delightful 
house party on Friday at bis country home in Saratoga in 
honor of Madame Emma Calve. 

ARMSBY — After a delightful winter in California, where she 
lias been among the gayest of the season's debutantes. Miss 
Leonora Armsby will leave for her home in New York on 
January 3 0. 

GOING ABROAD — Miss Edna Taylor, daughter of Mrs. Stewart 
Lowery; Miss Alice Reuua. daughter of the Mark Requas of 
Piedmont, and Miss Jessie Knowlcs. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry .1. Knowles, are going abroad under the chaperonage 

of Miss Gamble, 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 

Van Nma Art., at Geary Street SAN FRANCISCO 

Is the most refined family hotel In the city 

— a home unsurpassed 

KI.MER M. WOOnBVRV Manaj-er 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Salter «1S0 rnjpr Management CARL S STANLEY 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 27, 1923 





financial; 




By P. N. BERINGER 



BANK, and trade conditions are improv- 
ing all of the time, despite the war 
conditions which have been imposed on Ger- 
many by France. In fact, in a great many 
directions some relief is expressed that the 
French hav^ taken drastic measures to bring 
an end to the stalemate which prevailed and 
which see ned destined to continue for al- 
ways. 



Now Something Must Happen 

Now, that the French have imposed their 
will upon Germany, and that Germany will 
be forced to a least make some kind of 
an effort to live up to the obligation im- 
posed upon her through the Versailles de- 
liberations, we may expect quite a general 
betterment of conditions in various other 
ways. 



Russia Threatens Poland 

Russia is agitating herself anew and Trot- 
• sky, the so-called iron man, is out with a 
large army and is carrying on a vast re- 
view on the borders of the Polish country. 
Pilsudsky, the president and commander in 
chief of the Poles, is on the other side of 
the border with a large army and he, too, 
is carrying on maneuvers of a war character. 
He is waiting to be attacked, or to attack. 
Russia has at various times threatened to 
place its large army in the field against some 
one or other and when it was not against 
England in Turkey it was against Poland 
to the north. It is nearing the time when 
some nation, with more hardihood than the 
others, will have to act energetically and 
prick that Russian bubble. Men, who are in 
the military business and diplomatists who 
know what they are talking about, say that 
Russia's armies are large but they do not 
possess the necessary modern field weapons, 
as far as artillery is concerned, to stand up 
against any first class nation, such as Britain 
or France. 



German-Russian Coalition 

There is little doubt that Russia has been 
trying to bring about a union between it- 
self and Germany. The German character 
does not lend itself to that kind of a union 
and it would be the very last thing the Teu- 
ton would contemplate as a possibility and 
then only in order to prevent a total disin- 
tegration. And the practical Hans and Gret- 
chen know full well that by paying their 
debts they will get off much more easily 
and cheaper than by allowing the Trotsky 
bear to swallow them alive. 



the vast amount of cocoanuts being used in 
this country in the multitude of things which 
may be manufactured from this wonderful 
nut. We have imported $300,000,000 worth 
of cocoanuts since the beginning of the war 
and these nuts have been changed in nature 
into hundreds of food products, including 
candies, butter and certain confection fillers, 
while glycerin, soap and many other articles 
of domestic use have also been made of the 
same nut. So, long live the cocoanut, espe- 
cially as we grow so many in our own is- 
lands and dependencies. After the war use 
of the products of the cocoanut declined 
and the sales dropped. There was a universal 
complaint among the importers, and those in 
this country who extracted the oil from the 
copra or dried nut. However, the period 
of slump is being forgotten and the demand 
for cocoanuts is on the increase again. 



Should Manufacture Silk 

Z. Kudo, one of a party of Japanese silk 
manufacturers, advises us that we should 
manufacture silk and he refers particularly 
to the people of the Pacific Coast states. 
Mr. Kudo says he thinks it possible to es- 
tablish silk factories and supply the world 
with manufactured California silks. That 
suggestion has been made before by others 
but the American people have not taken 
kindly to the idea of such manufacture to 
try this means to establish the industry from 
the ground up, and space forbids going into 
a lengthy discussion of the many reasons ad- 
vanced by Americans against the attempt. 
At the same time it is wise to remember 
the American silk industry represents $1 ,000,- 
000,000 a year. 



Canadians Coming Here in Throngs 

The Southern Pacific Company has been 
doing some very fine publicity work among 
the prosperous Canadian people of the prov- 
inces and officials of the company expect 
a large number will begin arriving in Cali- 
fornia about March or February. 



A Cocoanut Country 

The United States of North America has 
become a cocoanut country, by virtue of 



Columbia Steel 

The Columbia Steel Company has placed 
on the market an issue of $4,000,000 worth 
of bonds. This company has been a very 
successful one, from the start of its opera- 
tions. The business has shown a constant 
growth and now has plants at Pittsburg, 
Calif., and at Portland, Ore. The business 
of the corporation, as it is operated at the 
present time, is only a small part of what it 
will be when it is finally ready to run full 
blast. W. E. Creed, Joseph D. Grant, Her- 
bert Fleischhacker, John S. Drum and W. 
W. Crocker are the directors of the cor- 
poration. These and their associates have 



subscribed for $3,250,000 of preferred stock 
at par, to be paid in cash, to provide the 
corporation with additional funds for the con- 
struction program and working capital to 
discharge purchase money obligations of ap- 
proximately $750,000,000. 



Effect of Industrial Peace 

The effect of industrial peace in San Fran- 
cisco and the bay district has been such that 
it has loosened capital for investment in 
building operations and 1923 will see an 
investment which is estimated at several mil- 
lions of dollars in business structure and in 
the building of homes. Realtors and archi- 
tects tell us that in no season of the past 
has there been such good promise for the 
immediate future as there is in this. 



The Business Pessimist 

The business pessimist is still abroad in 
the land, roaming around sowing the seed 
of distrust wherever and whenever he thinks 
he has found a fertile brain in which it will 
sprout into additional pessimistic ideas. But 
the figures do not help the pessimist any at 
this time in his campaign. The pessimist in 
business is no more to be objected to than 
the optimist. One may be just as destruc- 
tive as the other and just as misleading. 
The part of the pessimist and the optimist 
most objectionable to decent business peo- 
ple is that which is found in some of the, 
elaborate lies told to bolster tales of gloom 
or tales of unexampled prosperity. The fact 
of the matter is we have no reason to ex- 
press pessimistic views at this time, and yet 
we may not truthfully claim the era of 
great prosperity is upon us. It may be taken 
as certain the European conditions will be 
reflected here in a decline of activity but 
this is most strongly doubted by most bank- 
ers. Those interviewed hold to the idea that 
the period of making faces at one another 
in Europe is now over and the era of ac- 
tion is on, which will bring good results. 



The Export Business 

The export business for 1922 has been 
one of remarkable results, despite the fact 
that the exporters themselves were of a mind 
that scarcely any business to boast about 
had been done in that year. The total ex- 
ports of the country amount to more than 
four billion dollars worth of American raw 
products and manufactured commodities. The 
Pacific Coast, of course, figures only in a 
small way, when compared with the great 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter, Just Out 

350 BunIi Street 
Phone Kearny 1726 San Francisco. Cal. 






January 27. 1923 



VISIT 



"The 
Catacombs" 

AT 

CYPRESS LAWN 
CEMETERY 

City Office: 

995 Market St. 

San Francisco 

PHONES: SUTTER 695 

DOUGLAS 4772 



Enroll Now in 

COSGROVE'S SCHOOL 



of 



Hair Dressing 

and 

Beauty Culture 

A course in the above makes you in- 
dependent. See 

MR. AND MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Kearny 2842 



St. Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people "who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

records made by the Atlantic and Gulf states. 
New York has exported more than ever be- 
fore, except during certain hectic periods 
of the war, and New Orleans exports have 
increased by leaps and bounds. The impor- 
tations have also increased over the pre- 
vious year, and the indications are that in 
both export and import business this coast 
is destined to play a more and more im- 
portant and expanding part as the years 
toll by. Trade between this country and 
Japan and the Far Eastern part of the 
world is destined to increase in quantity very 
materially for the year 1923. 



19 



Inlercoastal Business 

A phenomenal increase in trade via the 
Panama canal is the record for the past 
year and instead of a decrease, which was 
expected by some, there has been such an 
increase that it has been quite astonishing. 
And instead of a predicted decrease at this 
time of the year, which is seasonal, the de- 
crease has not come at all. In fact, steam- 
ship business, coastal and trans-Pacific, is 
increasing at a very healthy rate at this time 
and it is expected this activity will continue. 



Nevada and California Mines 

All Nevada mines report an increasing 
production. Goldfield has become much more 
active in many directions. It was predicted 
in these columns that the development of 
Silver Pick would eventually lead to a re- 
newed activity in the Goldfield district. And 
this has come to be. The Silver Pick is 
again exposing excellent values on the fourth 
level of it lease on Red Top ground. The 
Sandstorm-Kendall is reported as having 
struck a rich shoot near the surface, and as 
being engaged in its development. The same 
company is reported to be getting ready to 
develop a rich territory parallelling the 
ground worked in the early days of the dis- 
trict. 



More Trucks lin the Service 

The Tonopah Divide has arranged for an 
increase in the number of trucks being op- 
erated between the mine and the Belmont 
Mill. The monthly output will shortly be 
increased to 3000 tons. 



California Mines 

The reports from all of the mines in North- 
ern California continue good and in some 
localities there is an unwonted activity con- 
sidering the season of the year. 

Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



Quality 1866-S6 Years -1922 Quanlltr 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Burllnffame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Wood»tde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works : 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Street* 

San Frnnrlx-i' Phon« Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 14S8 

Economy Durability 



Few People Take Proper Care of Their Teeth 

Sonic think that a vigorous brushing once 
or twice a day Is taking: very good curt* 
of them. Brushing Is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your 
teeth which only a competent dentist can 
take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you Imagine. 
A toothache means trouble; do not wait 
for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy 
teeth faster than decay. Are your teeth 
sore? Do your gums bleed? Call in today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My 
nerve blocking system blocks off all nerves 
and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Garfield 835 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; 
Self Cleansing Bridges; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



Mayerle's 




Expert Optical Service and 

Scientific Eye Examinations 

960 Market Street 

29 Yeara in San Francisco 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a little better than geemi necessary" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold In similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or, if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
«7-45 First Street - - San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Guaranteed Factory Rebuilt 

AH Makes «■"•>"■*■> 

*^ w ** REPAIRED 

See the New Remington Portable 
The Standard Keyboard Portable 

Paper — Ribbons — Carbon — Supplies 
AMERICAN WRITING MACHINE CO. 

B06 Market St., San Fran. Phone Dous. fit'l 
808 12th St.. Oakland Phone Oakland 2764 



— ANNUAL MEETING — 

THK JOSHUA HKMIV IKON WORKS 
The regular annual meeting of the stock- 
holders of The Joshua Hendy Iron Works 
will he held at the office of the Corpora- 
lion. No. 7 5 Fremont Street. San Fran- 
cisco. California, on Tuesday, the 13th day 
of February, 1923. at the hour of 10 
o'clock a. m.. for the purpose of electing 
a Board af Directors to serve for the en- 
suing year, and the transaction of such 
oiher business as may come before the 
meeting. 

CBAS. C. GARDNER. Secretary. 
Office. 75 Fremont Street. San Francisco, 
Cal. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 27, 1923 




PIyE>ASURE/S WAND 



'Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




Irr>-cria! 

Nazimova in the title role of Oscar Wilde's 
"Salcme" is the artistic event of the motion 
picture season thus far. None will gainsay 
this. Exotic? Yes, both author and actress 
are that. And exquisitely artistic, piognant- 
ly tragic and tender, fiercely cruel — these 
all are characteristic traits of Wilde and of 
Nazimova. The complete understanding this 
great actress shows of the weird and fan- 
tastic genius of the great playwright, is a 
revelation in screen acting. She tumultuously 
carries us along through her varying moods 
and passions and we stop not to think, we only 
know in the depths of our souls that this is 
superb acting and by it we are absorbed. 
It is to be observed that many of the dis- 
tressing qualities of the drama when shown 
on the stage are in the screen version min- 
imized considerably, handled in fact with 
great skill are several of the terrific scenes 
of this tragedy. "Salome" is a brilliant pro- 
duction. It is presented by Charles Bryant. 

Only eight people "acting out" a remote 
bit of history for our diversion. And yet when 
we leave the Imperial theater after this per- 
formance it is with the feeling that we have 
lived, and lived and lived since we entered 
two hours before. We have been stirred to 
our depths; horrified, appalled, appeased, 
ruthlessly torn out of our smug and easy- 
going emotional existence and tossed into a 
tempest of vital suffering. The picture is 
wonderfully put on, but the incidental music 
is far from satisfactory and will no doubt be 
severely corrected before "Salome" begins 
its second week of sensational success. 



California 

One of the most pleasant personalities 
among our film friends at this present phase 
of screen drama development is Agnes Ayres. 
There is something thoughtful and whole- 
some and gentle and genuine about her; she 
makes the big appeal to both head and heart 
— also she is good to look upon. In "A 
Daughter of Luxury" Miss Ayres is not al- 



S«n FRAMC1SCO 



W N^OEMVVVfc- 




I 



MA ™f s 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.35 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted in Dress Circle 
and Loges 



together fortunately placed, as to part or 
play. Accidents will happen even in the 
best regulated movie families, and this 
Daughter of Luxury is just a slight mishap 
for the actress in question. Happily, the 
supply of motion pictures is endless, and she 
will be fitted more suitably in her next ap- 
pearance. 

Ben Black's alliterative orchestra continues 
to be a popular feature of the California's 
entertainment, having now reached the stage 
of excessive popularity where everything they 
do is greeted with shouts of delight. This 
will last for a certain length of time and 
then it will fade away, and those of us who 
are not so hilariously enthusiastic about this 
harmless form of amusement, will do well to 
sit and polite bide our time. For our time 
will surely come. Won't it? The time when 
sane music will be heard within the Cali- 
fornia's stately walls, and words of some 
poetical value will accompany these sooth- 
ing strains. There are such things, you know. 
It is not as if they did not exist. There are 
poets and there are composers who make 
songs and melodies. Some day, in our day, 
we shall hear them. But not rendered by the 
big and banal band of the bold Mister Ben 
Black. "Leather Crushers" I had never 
thought to take into my heart and enjoy, 
but so strange a thing is human nature with 
is vagaries, that I find these punching pictures 
quite fascinating and the nice young Denny 
person with the Greek neck is a great fav- 
orite with me. 



deed delightful. The Hawaiian singers and 
dancers add greatly to the evening's suc- 
cess. 



Alcazar 

This is the season for Hawaii and if you 
have not three weeks to spare for the trip, 
just take three hours off and drop in at the 
Alcazar and see "The Bird of Paradise," 
Richard W. Tully's colorful play which after 
ten years of popularity is as bright and at- 
tractive as ever, and splendidly presented 
hy our own stock company, headed by Nana 
Bryant, who makes a charming Luana, and 
handsome Dudley Ayres content to sink his 
personality in the role of a devil-may-care 
beach comber. Emmet Vogan has the part 
of Miss Bryant's beloved, and gives an ad- 
mirable performance. An unusually large 
cast is required for this drama and we have 
the opportunity of seeing many old Alcazar 
friends, among them the amiable Marie Dun- 
kle, clever Hope Drown, and that most vici- 
ous of villains, Brady Kline. I always quar- 
rel wi'h Mr. Kline's enunciation, and al- 
ways shall. It gets no better and invariably 
spoils his acting which very often is good. 
Why, one of the first things an actor learns 
to do is open his mouth, but not so Kline! 
He continues to snarl through clenched 
teeth and I continue to rail at him. The 
stage direction of Hugh Knox has a large 
scope in this play, and the results are in- 



Sequoia 

The American comedy on the present bill, 
which closes Tuesday, January 30, is "Piety 
and Pie," by Blanche Cumming, a local 
writer. It has had such a successful opening 
at the Little Theater that dramatic organiza- 
tions from three neighboring cities have 
written the director requesting her to bring 
her production to their own playhouses. The 
other comedies and farces on the present bill 
are "A Sunny Morning," by the Spanish au- 
thors, Serafin and Joaquin Quintero; "Ros- 
alie," by the Frenchman, Max Maurey, and 
"The Lost Silk Hat." by the British play- 
wright, Lord Dunsany. 



Granada 

The motion picture distorters have not 
done a thing to Marie Corelli's "Thelma." 
Its own mother would hardly know it. Jane 
Novak as the heroine is charming as ever, 
but the play is a flighty and unsatisfactory 
affair with only a few interesting intervals. 
Paul Ash came to the rescue of the even- 
ing's program with some more of his musical 
nonsense and Wallace played the organ to 
the joy of his many enthusiastic admirers. 
At the Granada the responsibility does not 
rest upon any one part of the bill — there 
is sure to be something good. But "Thelma" 
will soon sink into obscurity. 



Orpheum's Display of All New Goods 

Nothing at all left over; everything brand 
new and sparklingly bright in its novelty. 
The one-act play alone is worth a visit. 
John Davidson in his intensely interesting 
act called "Circumstantial Evidence" de- 
serves all the applause he gets, for the per- 



Not mere words 



of ours alone would convince you of the 
superior .service which we render. If you 
are a customer of any of our establish- 

nis you are familiar with our efficiency 

hut if you are not. one visit will convince 
you that there is a vast difference be- 
tween our optical service and ordinary 
optical service. 

W . D. Fennltnore A. R. Fennlmora 

J. w. DavL 




Sao Franclaeo - 181 Post, 2608 Mlaalon St: 
Berkeley - 2106 Shattuck Avenne 

Oakland ------ 1221 Broadway 



January 27. 1923 

formance of this able actor and his com- 
pany in the jury scene is one that will not 
soon be forgotten. 

Frisco is a jazz dancer of considerable 
originality and delights the lovers of this 
form of terpsichorean gymnastics. Charles 
O'Donnell and Ethel Blair do a bit of ex- 
cellent comedy work, and Stan Stanley with 
his company affords lots of laughs. In Ade- 
laide Bell we have a danseuse of rare charm. 
The songs of Hughes and Debrow are an 
attractive feature. The Flying Henrys do 
remarkable feats in the air. 



Symphony Concert 

Next Thursday night, February I, the 
fourth popular concert of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra, municipal series, will 
take place at the Exposition auditorium. 
These concerts have proven successful to a 
degree and it is to be regretted that there 
will be but one more this season, after Thurs- 
day night's program is played. 

Conductor Hertz will present his instru- 
mentalists on this occasion in Beethoven's 
Symphony No. 5, in C Minor, one of the 
greatest works of the kind ever written and 
recently played by the orchestra with telling 
effect. The other orchestral numbers will be 
the Dance of the Blessed Spirits from "Or- 
pheus," by Gluck, and Tscheikowsky's "Ital- 
ian Caprice." 

For the first time this season there will be 
an instrumental soloist, in the person of 
Benno Moiseivitch, the famous young Rus- 
sian pianist, who will be seen at his best in 
the Liszt Piano Concerto in E Flat Major. 
This will be his second and final appearance 
in San Francisco. 

The prices for these concerts are very 
low, ranging from 25 cents to $1. This is 
made possible by the auditorium committee 
of the board of supervisors, in charge of the 
concerts. 



All New Show Billed at Orpheum 

An all new show comes to the Orpheum 
next week, headed by Raymond Hitchcock; 
a quintet of old-time favorites in the persons 
of Barney Fagan, Lizzie Wilson, Joe Sulli- 
van, Tony Williams and Corinne included 
in the bill will bring back old memories 
to Orpheum goers, and the rest of the pro- 
gram is full of bright entertainment. 



Alfred Hertz 

The re-engagement of Alfred Hertz for 
two years as director of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra sets at rest persistent 
rumors to the effect that a change in con- 
ductors was contemplated, and is a matter 
upon which to congratulate the board of 
governors of the Musical Association. 

The San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, 
in its artistic progress, has the laudable am- 
bition to be "second to none," and with 
Hertz continuing as director, there is no rea- 
son why this ambition cannot be carried out. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

Blinn, the distinguished American actor and 
native San Franciscan, beginning next Sun- 
day matinee, February 4, who comes to the 
Alcazar for a brief starring engagement. 

His first offering will be "The Bad Man," 
in which he has achieved his greatest acting 
triumph. 

At the Alcazar Blinn will have as his lead- 
ing woman Nana Bryant, and the role in 
which she will be cast in "The Bad Man" 
is one to which she is especially well suited. 



21 



Alcazar 

A notable event in San Francisco theater 
annals will be the appearance of Holbrook 



ECHOES OF THE QUATR'Z ARTS BALL 

They are still talking about it — that 
Quatr'z Arts ball the artists of San Fran- 
cisco's many art colonies put on at the 
Fairmont last Friday night — and yet no one 
will ever know the half of it. So much 
entertainment was going on in several places 
at once. At least 2000 revelers danced in 
colorful fantasy until the wee sma' hours. 
Every phase of the frolic was by the artists 
and for the artists and of course their art 
patron friends who were fortunate enough 
to receive invitations. There was no huge 
theme of pageantry but little bursts of color 
and dance contributed by the various players 
clubs and schools of the dance. There were 
little satires on modern tendencies in thought, 
by the Russian Hill group — and early in the 
morning bits of solo dancing by lovely little 
dancers. 

The show started in the terrace ballroom 
by a thirteenth century pageant wagon 
brought in by the Sausalito Players. This 
"Noblee Peoples" were led by Wilbur Hall, 
who chartered a boat to bring sixty-five play- 
ers to the ball. Then in quick succession 
appeared real Bacchanale dancers, lithe, 
lovely maidens trained in the Anita Peters 
Wright school; a satire on the dance by the 
Berkeley Intelligentzia, led in the title role 
of "Isadora Buncum," by Emil Grebs; a 
human goat herd from Telegraph Hill dashed 
merrily and goatily into the room, followed 
by Mrs. Lafler in classic pastoral dancer 
costume (or lack of costume?). 

A little later some very elaborately lighted 
fantasies were put on the stage, among them 
the cubistic dance by Gualtiero Bartilini, 
which requires a knowledge of the fourth 
dimension to describe. Sigmund Freud 
himself, in the person of Sam Berger, ap- 
peared with sixteen Suppresions, who re- 
vealed themselves as well known writers of 
Russian Hill. The Coue Convicts assembled 
in a travesty on that modern thought. The 
Foster & Kleiser Poster Artists effected a 
decorative "Freeze" depicting "Wright's 
Wrong," which proved that their well known 
formula for combining value and color is 
worthy of any large ballroom. 

There was barbarism in the color scheme 
and lighting, blatant notes from bag-pipes 
and accordians in the arms of minstrels. 

Then as a final "cheer up" for the dull 
days following after, we have a message 
from the executive committee to the effect 
that there will be a tidy little sum set aside 
as a nucleus for an even greater frolic next 
year. As there were no paid entertainers and 



II0TELPLA7A 

Jan francisco 



DINING-ROOM 

Surprisingly good meals 
pleasingly served. Note 
t n e moderate prices : 

Jreakfast 25c to 75o 
Luncheon 65c 
Dinner SI. 25 

(A la Carte Service also) 




every member of each committee gave their 
service for nothing except love of San 
Francisco as an art center, it was a true 
expression of the happy heart of this city 
full of artists, sculptors, players' clubs, danc- 
ers and writers. 



San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 

AI.KKK1) HERTZ, Conductor 
Fourth Popular Concert 

EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 
Thurs. Eve., Feb. 1, 8:20 

Last San Francisco Appearance of 
BENNO 

MOISEIVITCH 

The Pomona Russian Pianist, <;uest Artist 

Reserved Scats $1, 75c, 50c and 25c 

I No war tax) 

Xow on Sale at Sherman, Clay ft Co. 'a 
i tired Ion Auditorium Committee. 

It. .aril nf Supervisors 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-162.1 Market Street 

llttween Franklin and Courh 

TH^phon* Park 271 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 27, 1923 



Fred Kahn 



Automotive Engineering in Its 
Entirety 

UNDER ONE ROOF 



General Repairing and Overhauling 



Fender and 
Radiator Work 
Body Building 
Woodwork 
Machine Work 



Ignition 

Welding 

Brazing 

Blacksmithing 

Klectrical 



Carburetion 



Experts in Every Branch 
1507 SUTTER Telephone West 8296 

Authorized Elgin Parts and Service 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint .iot guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Tour investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 8418 -Phones- Prospect 8419 

WHAT BEST SEKVES THE PCBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Hours: 2 till 4, and by Appointment 

Phone Suiter 1718 

REMOVED TO 

Howard Building, 309 Post Street 

Corner Grant Avenue. San FrancUoo 



1 m 

1 The Automobile 1 

a m 

ya.KaaSa.-Saaa.gsiliSSSaiBBElSglisa'S'a 3 
Marmon Man Returns 
Rene J. Marx, associated with Renault of 
France in his racing days, a well-known au- 
thority on all matters relating to the auto- 
mobile, has given up his position as Pacific 
Coast representative of Nordyke & Marmon 
Co. to take charge of the Marmon sales ex- 
tension of Butler-Veitch, Inc., in this city. 



Limiting of Truck Weights 

Recently appointed members of the state 
highway commission are of the opinion that 
overloaded trucks are ruining the roads. One 
way to stop this ruination would be to limit 
the weight. Seventy-five per cent of the 
trucks in operation in the southern end of 
the state are overloaded, in the opinion of 
Engineer R. M. Morton, of the highway com- 
mission. The limiting of truck weights is 
sure to protect our present highways and 
give an opportunity to the commission to 
keep them in repair. 



Gasoline Tax Received Favorably 

Harvey M. Toy, newly appointed member 
of the state highway commission, is of the 
opinion that the proposed gasoline tax for 
the maintenance of roads is receiving a most 
favorable reception. He says: 

"The majority of people seem to feel that 
the present registration tax should be cut to 
a flat fee of approximately $5 a car and 
that the bulk of this fee be turned back to 
the counties in which it is collected for road 
funds, while the entire gasoline tax go to 
the state for the maintenance and the con- 
struction of the highways." 



Rickenbacker Pays Cash Dividend 

After not quite a year of production, the 
Rickenbacker Motor Company directors have 
declared a 5 per cent cash dividend on all 
stock of record on December 30, payable 
February I. Approximately 5000 cars have 
been built and shipped, and plans for 1923 
contemplate an output of 10,000. 



Pelletier Joins Rickenbacker 

LeRoy Pelletier has been appointed di- 
rector of sales promotion and publicity by 
the Rickenbacker Motor Company. The po- 
sition is newly created. 



Lincoln Production Running High 

Unfilled orders for Lincoln cars will keep 
the factory busy for two years to come. 
Earnings of the company are now at the rate 
of $1,000,000 annually. 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 891 San Francisco 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



Ihe \ 

MOTOR OIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
thenewHEXEON 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Tel. Franklin 30R5 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining to Automobile** 

Oxy-Acetylene Welding — Blaekmnlthlng 

H. W. Culver M. Daberer E. Johnston 



LEE S. DOLSON 



CHAS. J. EVANS 



Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; 87.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

05 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
$1.25 

Steals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

SultH Pressed by Hand, Only — 
Suits Called for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 
433 Mason St. Phone Franklin 3510 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



» Compensation 

General 
Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident ami 
Health 




Fidelity and 
Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 
Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR . . Manager 

05 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 30th, 1922 

Assets $80,671,392.53 

Deposits 76,921,392.53 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,750,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 400,613.61 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulioa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter 

(4M) P er cent per annum was declared for the six 

months ending December 31st, 1922. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 
Anglo-London-Paris Company 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 5600 
San Francisco, Calif. 



RECOMMENDS 



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FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 

first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6 3/4% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOND 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

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4S5 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON'. ENG.: NEW YORK; 

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San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



S>m iFranrtHrn (Eljrnturle 



Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 

Newspaper made every 



A Newspaper made day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for 91.15 a month — 

including Sunday editions 

Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdeal. r or postmaster 




N. W. CORNER 
FRANKL°N E 2960 POLK AND POST STS. 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to II p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



Electrical Repairs, Making and 
Spraying, Electrical Fixtures, 

Wiring, Supplies 

Goldberg Electric Co. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

2086 Polk Street 

Phone Prospect 7528 



SAN FRANCISCO 



- CALIF. 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11 :30 to 2 p. m.).... 75c 

Dinner. Week Days 91.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. .91. 75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

•Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 




Tlu HOTEL AMBASSADOR, Los Angctcs: Myron Hunt. Architect; N. 9. Nclioa Mfg. Co.. Jobber; Arthur lies. Plumber 

KOHLER 

And The HOTEL AMBASSADOR 






Kohler "Viceroy" Built-in Batli 
Rccclt pattern 



Sweeping vistas of spacious lawns and luxuriant 
gardens are afforded to every guest by the striking 
plan of the new Hotel Ambassador, I.os Angeles. 

Naturally, no less care was expended by the archi- 
tects to insure in every interior detail a perfection 
of appointments in keeping with this admirable 
scenic setting. 

The selection of Kohler "Viceroy" Built-in Baths 
tor the Hotel Ambassador s 351 bathrooms aptlv 
confirms the judgment of architects, plumbers, and 
builders everywhere in their customary choice of 
Kohler Enameled Plumbing Ware and in their 
appreciation of its durability, its utility, and the 
uniformity of its glistening, snow-white beauty. 

* * * 

The new Kohler Catalog F, just published, is a 
valuablehandbookofthelatestdevelopmentsin fine 
plumbing ware. If you have not received your 
copy, please write us on your business stationerv. 

KOHLER of KOHLER 

Kohler Co., FounJr.J 1S73, Kohler, Wisconsin 
Shipping Point, Sheboygan, Wisconsin 

BRANCHES IN PRINCIPAL CITIES 



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MANUFACTURERS OF ENAMELED PLUMBING WARE AND KOHLER AUTOMATIC POWER AND LIGHT 110 VOLT D. C. 



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— — — — — 

SAN FRANCISCO 



California Advertiser 



$5.00 PER YEAR 



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1923 



LOS ANGELES 




I Compensation 

General 
Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR . . Manager 

105 MONTGOMERY STREET 



Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings 

Banks or San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 30th, 1922 

Assets $80,671,392.53 

Deposits 76,921,392.53 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,750,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 400,613.61 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESl DIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7lh Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haiplu and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors cf Four and One-quarter 

(4M) P er cent per annum was declared for the six 

months ending December 31st, 1922. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 
Anglo-Londoo-Paris Company 



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ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1866 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. CII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1923 



No. 5 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building. Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco. Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco. 
Calif.. Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $6.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year. $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



— A plan to form a buffer state in the Rhineland provinces is being 
formulated. The would-be nation has our sympathy. A buffer state is 

always bound to be biffed. 

* * * 

— The sensible business woman, and any other sensible woman for 
that matter, will not discard the freedom and sanitation of short 
skirts. If the streets must be swept by trailing robes, let the friv- 
olous sisterhood do it! 

* * * 

— While Europe is seething on the verge of another world war, 
the ex-kaiser, who first kindled the torch that set the world ablaze, 
is safely ensconced in a peaceful Dutch village, receiving birth- 
day congratulations. 

* * * 

— La Belle France, in the beginning of the late war, had the 
sympathy and admiration of the world, and deserved it. In her 
latest move she may not only lose the world's sympathy, but her- 
self, into the bargain. 

* * ¥ 

— Miss Florence Nesbit, chairman of the cost of living committee 
of the Illinois League of Woman Voters, makes the astounding state- 
ment that a man can live on $2.50 per week. We agree that a man 

might liveon $2.50 for one week! 

* * * 

— "The British attitude to France ought to be that of the first 
Lord Holland when his infant son announced his intention of 
breaking up a valuable gold watch in order to set it going, — 'Well, 

if you must, you must,' " says the Daily Express. 

* * » 

— A total of 704 new bills filed in the state legislature up to the 
end of last week! We must be an awfully wild and reckless set 
of people in this old California to need all those new laws. What 
wise man once said, "The least governed people are the best gov- 
erned"? 

* * * 

— The accounts of the Bell case (which crops up periodically 
ever since we can remember) reads like a plot in one of Miss 
M. E. Braddon's novels. Strange and criminal things happened in 
those days, and were hushed up. The occupants of the Bell house 
were evidently strong believers in the old English maxim, "A man's 
house is his castle." It makes one look with suspicion at some of 
the gloomy, austere mansions of the city, and wonder what is going 
on behind those mausoleum portals? What shadows may have been 
thrown upon those blinded windows? 



— Not being able to put ourselves into the minds of the learned 
men of the House naval affairs committee, we cannot say what is 
causing them to hesitate in accepting Alameda's offer of its site 
as a naval base. For ourselves, the question could be answered, after 
viewing the numerous acres of mud that form its "water-front." 

— If the Rev. Percy Stickney Grant cannot agree with the church 
which he is supposed to represent, why does he not withdraw from 
that church, and set up another religion, based on his own beliefs? 
"This shows me how easy it is for anyone to start a new religion," 
said a man in the street, who after gazing up into the sky for a 
few minutes, looked around him, to find that a vast crowd had 
gathered, and were doing the same thing. 

— A delegation from an organization representing forty-one so- 
cieties of women, has been lobbying at Sacramento for a law regu- 
lating private employment agencies. A private employment agency 
should not be allowed to exist. The employment of a city's resi- 
dents, the precious boon of work to men and women who are anx- 
ious and willing to work, and who have lived in a city for years, 
and have proved their worth, should be strictly the affairs of that 
cjty, and the working man or woman will be at the mercy of these 
private employment agencies until municipal employment bureaus 
in all cities are instituted. 

* * * 

— It would seem that it was only logical foresight for the United 
States to allow Chinese emigration to the Hawaiian Islands. 
Only the Orientals can compete with the Orientals in the matter of 
labor and living standards; it is not at all probable that white 
labor can ever be secured for the sugar plantations, and the grow- 
ing Japanese population is a menace. The Chinese are, as a rule, 
peace-lovers, hard workers, and can live in the Hawaiian climate, 
where a white man cannot, for any length of time. The situation 
in the Islands, as regards the production of sugar, which is admitted 
free to the markets of America, is one that demands action on the 
part of the United States government. 

* * * 

— There is no body of men in the state of California more im- 
portant to its development than that of the California Real Estate 
Association. It is not too much to say that the whole real estate 
business has up to now been very chaotic — indeed the word is so 
mild in face of the facts as to be rather ridiculous than forcible. 
But it appears as if a new day was dawning when our local Bab- 
bitts will at least be able to maintain their claims to be an organ- 
ized body of real professional standing. This much-to-be-desired 
result will come about through the efforts of Frazier D. Reed, presi- 
dent of the said association, whose proposal for a qualification for 
prospective realtors seems to fill all the requirements. To be sure 
that when you have a real estate agent you have a man who will 
measure up to the standards of a really responsible person, will 
mean a great deal to the public confidence. It will also mean that 
those who have labored sincerely will not have worked in vain. 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




France, in Germany, continues to be the 
Danger of Being Trapped foremost topic as to the state of Europe. 

In the United States, if one is to judge 
by the expressions of opinion in the newspapers and by what has 
been said in Congress, the American people are now relying rather 
on their sober senses than on the opinions of those who have been 
opposed to the success of the allied nations from the beginning of 
the terrible war, precipitated by Germany into Belgium and France. 
A very large proportion of the people of this country, who are gifted 
with sound common sense, fear that France has taken a step she 
will regret, not because she has not done the right and proper thing, 
to make Germany pay, but because she has entered Germany in 
a wedge-shaped form and these people fear that if Germany has 
been successful in hiding away large quantities of arms, she will 
envelope and crush the French forces as in a nut cracker. 



There are many examples, horrible re- 
Examples Are Not Lacking miniscences, of how nations have been 

trapped and crushed by what they con- 
sidered enemies whom they could despise. Remember the force of 
Italians smashed by the Abysinians and the terrible massacre which 
followed the victory of the old ruler of the land of Rasselas. The 
Italians were so thoroughly beaten they never have had or thought 
of a revenge. In this country we have an example of how an officer 
may mistake the capacity for dealing him harm by his enemy in 
the Custer mascacre. And there are numbers of other cases, where 
large numbers of men have been sacrificed needlessly because some 
one underestimated the strength of the enemy and had too much 
confidence in himself and in his army. 



In this country, we once more have the evidence 
The Yellow Press before us of the great capacity the yellow press, 

and some of the same ilk which is not yellow, 
has for making mischief and leading the people's thoughts awry 
and estray on great public questions. Leading the pack of journals 
and daily striving to put France in a false position before the Amer- 
ican people, we have the Hearst newspapers. The people who _ write 
for these newspapers about European affairs "on the spot" and 
right here at home are graduate reporters who are not fitted by 
temperament, by experience or by learning to air their views. This 
fact is, however, not known to the reading public and from the 
Arch Piffle Philosopher Brisbane down these reporters and writers 
are pouring the poison for their master with just as much verve 
and with a devilish malignity, as they poured it during the war. It 
is useless to deny that, with a public in which has been bred the 
desire for isolation, this poison pouring has its baleful effects. It 
is one of the most astonishing facts that, if there ever arises an 
opportunity where Mr. Hearst may do his fellowmen and women a 
distinct harm through his papers, he gleefully and maliciously im- 
proves on the occasion. It was about time some indignant one got 
up in Congress and reminded us that we had a few lying dead in 
the fields of France. 



The modern military machine, however, is some- 
The Modern thing quite different than it was ten. twenty or 

Military Machine thirty years ago. It has its intelligence corps so 

well perfected that it would be almost impossible 
to gather together in any enemy or friendly country large amounts 
of small arms or artillery without this fact coming to the knowledge 
of the man at the head of the military machine. It is safe to sup- 
pose that Foch and his lieutenants know exactly the number of 
men who may be called to arms and the danger, great or small, 
which may threaten France in Germany. In the German possession 
now are no airplanes; they have a comparatively small amount 
of artillery and not any of this is of large calibre. They have only 
the nucleus of an army. 



The French determined that Germany 
The French Determination must live up to her accepted program ; 

that the allies should all combine to en- 
force this acceptance of the decision of the Versailles conference, 
agreed to by all of the nations, including Germany. Great Britain 
has seen fit to withdraw and is taking no steps to aid in the enforce- 
ment of the demands of France. Truth in this instance was not 
slow in making itself known and last week the news came from 
England the labor party in that country and the organized unions 
were demanding peremptorily that every kind of aid be taken away 
and that Great Britain should not even in appearance help the 
French collect the reparations money. So, the News Letter is once 
more found right. Weeks ago the statement was made in these 
columns that Great Britain was playing safe at home and that she 
had no valid reason, except the fear of the labor element, upon 
which to base her rather cowardly policy as to France and Germany. 



Raymond C. Brown, the secretary of the Terri- 
It May Be tory of Hawaii, is in the United States to labor 

Love's Labor Lost with us of the mainland as to the necessity of 

so amending the labor laws as to allow the Chi- 
nese to come to Hawaii. Hawaii has always been short of labor. 
She has had Portuguese, she has brought ship loads of Porto Ricans 
to her shores, she has had Chinese, and she seems to have been 
surfeited with Japanese. Now she is turning to the Chinese for 
help but she may not import these laborers, without running afoul 
of the labor laws. The white man will not work in the fields of 
waving cane under the hot sun. The labor unions and the laws, 
and the politicians, and the fools, will not allow Hawaii to have 
any Asiatic foreign labor. The question is not one as to whether 
Mr. Brown is able to convince the people in Congress as to what his 
country needs most, but rather whether Mr. Brown is capable of 
infusing a sufficient amount of courage into these congressmen and 
have them tell the labor unionite element and others to 'go to the 
devil. The exclusion laws of the mainland were enacted because 
it became quite evident a majority of the citizens of the mainland 
wanted these laws. It is just as evident that a very large majority 
of the people of the Territory of Hawaii do not desire the exclu- 
sion laws applied to their country and they give very good reasons 
why this should not be done. People will watch what Congress will 
do in this matter with much curiosity. 



Our city has been held back for a 
Unification of Street Railways decade of years because of inade- 
quate street car transportation fa- 
cilities and a lack of extensions and betterments. This stalemate in 
our street car transportation conditions is the dual transportation sys- 
tems which now exists in our city. The reason additional transporta- 
tion lines have not been built is due to the fact that the city under 
the charter can not give franchises to private corporations, and our 
young municipal system does not sufficiently cover our city so as to 
connect up with the needed extensions. Our only salvation lies in the 
unification of the two street car systems, so that our needed extensions 
may be built without useless duplication of existing lines, better serv- 
ice resulting from more direct routes to our outlying districts. 



February 3. 1923 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



li has been urged by all <■! oui improvemenl and <lisim l organiza- 
tions that the cit) go .ihe.icl at iintc with the unification of lier street 
car .systems. This plan, which has been twice endorsed by over- 
whelming majorities at the polls, provides that the city take over 
the properties of the Market Street Railway; the purchase price to 
te paid for out of the earnings of the properties. Under this plan the 
privately-cwned street car lines may become the property of the city, 
the needed extensions and betterments be built without any cost what- 
soever to the property-owners or taxpayers. The present is the time 
to do this, for it must be borne in mind that should the purchase of 
these properties be delayed until the expiration of their franchises, the 
money necessary for taking over the physical properties would have 
to be raised by general taxation besides the city losing the earnings 
of the company during that period of time. 



advanced, the mini operators ay, and that is less ncucmmtnt in 

business and more business in government. 



Assemblyman Dawson, of Huntington Park, has 
Cost of Gasoline come slap-bang into the limelight with a propo- 
sition that an investigation be had as to the cost 
of production and distribution of gasoline and, that when this is 
ascertained, some sort of regulation be established which will pre- 
vent oil companies from so taxing the gasoline consumer in the cost 
of gasoline that they may declare more stupendous dividends. This 
is a move in the right direction, as it will, if carried to a logical 
conclusion, set at rest a question about which is being waged a fear- 
ful controversy at all times. 



Suggestions from mine owners and oper- 
Safety Measures to ators in California that the California In- 

Prevent Mine Accidents dustrial Accident Commission employ a 

larger number of mine inspectors and the 
application of safety measures to fit each individual mine, as a result 
of the Argonaut disaster, instead of blanket rules, which would mean 
a waste of effort and a handicap in developing California's second 
industry, have been received with approval in all mining districts of 
California. 

The primary object to be attained, the mine operators urge, is to 
prevent mine accidents that cause loss of life or injury, although the 
records show that mining in California, compared with other occupa- 
tions, has been singularly free from disastrous accidents. Under the 
plan suggested, the inspectors would visit each mine, study the acci- 
dent records and give orders that would remedy the apparent defects 
in that individual mine. If this system were continued for several 
months, with practical miners as inspectors, the mine operators feel 
that better results would be obtained than by an attempt to enforce a 
long and theoretical list of safety rules on all mines alike. At least 
four competent inspectors, the mine operators say, would be needed 
for this task. 

The reason for insisting on competent inspectors is apparent, mine 
owners and operators hold. The inspector who has had little experi- 
ence in practical mining would be tempted to work by the book of 
safety rules rather than by experience. Such a procedure would re- 
sult in a hit or miss system of protection, which would be most in- 
effective in the saving of life, as well as an unwarranted burden on 
the industry. It is desired that protection be afforded against the 
destruction of life and maiming of men working in the mines, and 
only the inspector of experience in actual mine operation knows what 
definite and practical means should be taken to accomplish this 
result. 

Blanket safety rules and drastic mining laws, which would prac- 
tically give the State government control of mining, might well lead 
to interference and an endless amount of red tape. A bureaucratic 
system of government in business can only mean the stifling of initia- 
tive, investment and development. There is sound ground upon which 
a sane and right program for safe working conditions in mines can be 



San Francisco has been long on art during the 
California Artists last few weeks ; first the French exhibit at the 

at the Bohemian Club auditorium, then the present exhibit at the 
Bohemian Club, and beginning this Friday, an 
exhibit of eminent Americans at the Palace of Fine Arts, to say 
nothing of the usual minor exhibits at the art shops. 

We have been viewing art, trying to write art, and hearing art 
talked until we are feeling quite familiar with art — from the art of 
the Academicians, which we love, to the art of the Moderns, which 
we are trying (vainly) to understand. 

The several enthusiasts on this latter art, with whom we have 
come in contact so far, no doubt feel toward us — after expounding 
their school to more or less deaf ears — as they would have toward 
the donkey in the story of the artist who had completed a picture 
which was being rather severely criticized by a connoisseur. At 
that moment, a donkey came along (we surmise the picture was 
being painted in the open, rather than in a studio, although, of 
course, donkeys do sometimes stroll in a studio), and tried to nibble 
the painted thistles in the foreground of the picture. At which the 
artist exclaimed: "Now I know that this is a good picture!" 

Like the donkey, I do not know good art, I feel it; that is why, 
when I came into the hall of the Bohemian Club, I felt at home 
again, after a strenuous journey into uncharted seas. That is why 
I could smell those spring blossoms of Theodore Wores, whose flow- 
ering fruit trees haunt one like an echo of rhapsodic music; why 
Harry Fonda's "Kearny Street Flower Stand" would thrill us, "were 
we earth in an earthy bed"; why we compare the delicacy of Percy 
Gray's "Eucalyptus Trees" with Corot's; why we revel in the won- 
derful harmony of tones in Burgdorff's "Golden Fog." 

Arthur Beckwith's "Grand Canyon of Arizona" is a feast in col- 
ors; John Willard Clawson's "El Cigarrito" looks as though she 
might step out of her frame and do a cachucha for us, and we 
hear the soft "swish" of mimic waves sounding in Charles Rollo 
Peters' "Paradise Cove." 

Spencer Macky's portrait of Dr. David Starr Jordan is especially 
noteworthy, and Swinnerton's "City of the Dead" demands one's 
attention the moment one enters the room. What depth is here; 
what perspective, and what utter quietude! 

Some of the moderns are here; we haven't been able to escape 
them, and we are trying to look at them in a charitable and re- 
ceptive light, but as we turn to leave, we take one last sniff at 
Wores' springtime blossoms. 



— Friend Richardson is proving his progressiveness by recommend- 
ing equal pay for men and women. This is only just, and to have 
ever discriminated in the matter of remuneration on account of sex, 
when a man and woman are performing the same labor, merely shows 
that we have been living in the dark ages. 



The Sweetness 
of Low Prices 



Never Equals 



The Bitterness 
of Poor Quality 



We combine Quality, Price and Service 

JOHNSON BROS., Grocers 

Fillmore M. at Sn< ramrnUi — \t Your C umniand Phone Heit 240 



6 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 3, 1923 



1 *r 1 The Ranch of the Witches Head 1 ▼ 

By ELEANORE F. ROSS 

(Editor's Note- "The Ranch o£ the Witch's Head" will run tor several weeks 
in The News Letter- it is a whimsical and humorous description ot the vicissitudes 
of a city-bred family, who for a memorable year, try their hands at ranching in 
California; and it is absolutely true, so the author asserts.) 



CHAPTER I. 
Land Sharks 

I HAVE always thought that Mama missed fame and fortune in 
leading a domestic life, instead of "treading the boards" as a 
tragedian. I was thinking of this one rainy, windy evening early 
in March, when after assembling the family in the front parlor of the 
small hotel which she was mis-managing, she announced that she was 
going to sell the furniture at auction, and exchange our old Belmont 
home for a ranch of 140 acres in Placer County. 

"I can't cope with this terrible city," she said in tragic tones. "It is 
full of holdup men and land sharks. They would take the last cent 
from widow and orphans. Children, we must get out of here I " 

We gazed at her in amazed silence. Virgie, a slim, dark-eyed, 
dreamy maiden of twenty summers; Fannie, several years younger, 
small, plump, with big gray eyes and pretty brown curls ; myself— the 
youngest but tallest— pink-cheeked, light-haired, promising to be a 
"fine, strappin' woman," Maggie said. (But she failed, alas, in her 
prophecy, for I seem to have been sort of nipped in the bud, frost- 
bitten, perhaps by adversity!) 

Then came the two boys. Charles, small, nervous, big-eyed, with 
curly brown locks. Charlie, who, when he came into the world had 
usurped me from the role of baby of the house. Charlie, who has 
always looked upon himself and the world in general far too seriously. 
Percie sat on Maggie's lap, placidly eating candy. Percie, with fair 
hair and twinkling blue eyes, a fat little body and a jolly little soul. 
I loved Percie the best of all. 

Maggie, our old retainer, rocked back and forth apparently un- 
moved. Only her small, round, greenish-yellow eyes gleamed with a 
belligerent fire and her wide mouth was set in a grim smile. "Not a 
word, not a word, will she get out of me this day." 

Mama swept up and down the room with the train of her handsome 
tea gown swishing along over the carpet. Her black eyes sparkled, 
her cheeks glowed. She had the attention of all, in a quite dramatic 
situation. That in itself was a pleasure. 

"When you see the ranch you will be wild over it," she went on. 
"It is in the rolling foothills of the Sierras. Such wild flowers! Such 
bracing air! Maggie can raise chickens," (a smothered snort from 
Maggie) "we will have two fine cows, a horse and buggy and a dog 
that a man in Sacramento promised to lend us as long as we wanted 
it. I have heard from the young man who will help us on the ranch 
and who will meet us at the nearest station the very day we arrive. 
The neighbors seem to take quite an interest in us, and will show us 
different things about ranch life. Girls, I have thought of every- 
thing!" Mama paused to take breath. 

There was another tense silence. Each of us appeared to be think- 
ing deeply; though, as I look back to that long ago day, I imagine 
our thoughts were something like this : 

Virgie: "It doesn't much matter where we go; I will be married to 
Alesandro so soon." 

Fannie: "I wonder if I will have a good time up there? Perhaps 
there will be country dances!" 



Charlie: "Will I have to milk the cows? I suppose they will kick 
me!" 

Percie: "I'm awful sleepy!" 

Maggie: "Not a word, not a word will she get out of me this day! 

I was thinking with deep regret that was almost a pain, of the old 
house down the peninsula, the house to which we were never to re- 
turn. We always spoke of it as the "old house" though it had been 
built only a few years. For it was one of those rare accidents of 
dwellings that seem to melt into, and become one with its surround- 
ings; to take on at once an air of harmony and age. 

I saw again its "seven gables," with the background slope of blos- 
soming orchard, and beyond the fruit trees, the green, oak-covered 
hills. From the wide front porch I looked over the hay fields to the 
brown marshes with the blue creeks winding out to the bluer bay. I 
smelled the tar-weed-scented wind again, sweeping between the hills 
from the ocean, and heard its voice in the tall eucalyptus trees, like 
the sound of the sea. And my eyes misted over with tears. 

Virgie came out of her usual trance gradually. She was the oldest, 
and felt that something of an intellectual nature should flower into 
speech after her apparent thoughtfulness. "Mama," she said, at last, 
slowly and hesitantly, "I have read somewhere that water is really 
essential to ranching in this State. Is there water on the ranch?" 

I looked with great admiration at my eldest sister. This was surely 
a splendid show of sense! Perhaps, after all, her mind was occa- 
sionally occupied with other things beside her Spanish lover, moon- 
light nights, castanets and "La Paloma!" 

"Water?" Mama repeated, vaguely, and then again almost indig- 
nantly, "Water! Why, I don't know, I'm sure. But, oh girls, the 
scenery is simply beautiful!" 

After the family meeting had adjourned, I sought Maggie in her 
little bedroom opening off the kitchen. She was sitting at the window 
gazing into the dusk of the back yard, still with the belligerent fire 
in her eyes, and (as she always did, when disturbed in mind) crack- 
ing the joint of each finger with slowness and precision; one of her 
numerous accomplishments which I had often vainly tried. 

I deposited my healthy young body in her lap — an imposition 
which she bore without complaint. "Maggie," I said, very soberly, 
"What do you think of this plan?" Maggie gave vent to her feelings 
with one vast snort which effectively dislodged me, and then threw up 
her hands over her head with a gesture of resignation. 

"What would be the use of thinkin'?" she said. "It might as well 
be a ranch as anny other place. Faith, she has the restless foot!" 
(To be continued) 



— The board of supervisors has prepared a new ordinance to reg- 
ulate the charges of taxi drivers which will be put into effect in the 
near future, which provides for a maximum charge of 70 cents for 
a half mile or less. Even this seems too great a charge, but at 
least it is an improvement on the old rate, when a taxi driver could 
charge $1.25 for a distance of 1500 feet! Conditions in the past 
allowed a taxi driver to assume the arbitrary attitude of a highway- 
man. 



February 3, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



• ' *. W M U w W •* » W V- W V-~ %J «" W" W • • w" If W W *- *■ 



; ;; :; ;; j: « :t; 



Have You Heard It? 



— A Scotch farmer was dying on a night when a fierce storm was 
raging round the house. A cheery neighbor paid a visit with a view 
to comforting him, and found him very depressed. "Hoo are ye the 
nicht?" asked the visitor. "A'm no weel at a'," was the reply. "What's 
wrang wi' ye?" said the other, "ha'e ye something on yer mind?" 
"Weel," answered the invalid, "a'm just thinking it's a coorse nicht to 
be going through the air." "Eh, dinna ye fash yersel' aboot that, 
of the stores allowing them to display goods in an arcade effect. 

— A certain bishop noted for his ready wit was being shown 
through a small college to whose board of trustees he had been 
elected. It was a particularly warm day, and as the episcopal party 
crossed the campus the bishop noticed scores of students who had 
flung themselves down on the grass and lay there sleeping. The scene 
suggested a picture of a battlefield. The dean, his companion, opened 
a class-room door, wherein a very prosy professor was holding forth. 
"This, bishop, is math.," he said, in the college lingo. "Ah, yes," said 
the bishop; then, pointing to the sleeping students, he added with a 
smile, "and this, I suppose, is aftermath." 

— An attendant at a cemetery was very much in love, and was 
also extremely bashful. He could not make up his mind to ask the 
woman of his choice for her heart and hand in the ordinary manner. 
He made several attempts but always failed. One day he asked her 
to go for a walk, and led the way to the churchyard. Then, finding 
the lot where his ancestors lay, he pointed to the headstone and said, 
"All my folks are buried here, Jean; wadn't you like to be laid away 
here wi' 'em some day?" 

* * * 

Hearing that an old friend of hers was dangerously ill, an old lady, 
at considerable personal inconvenience, went to visit her, only to 
learn on her arrival that the alarming symptoms had subsided. "And 
how are you today?" she inquired, with breathless anxiety, as she 
stood by the patient's bed. "Nearly well," replied the invalid, "the 
doctor says he will soon have me about again." "Nearly well," gasped 
the other, indignantly, "after me coming so far to see you, too!" 

* * * 

— Wliile passing an old-fashioned inn in Scotland some tourists 
were attracted by an aged bagpiper who was tooting atrocious sounds 
through an instrument that was both dilapidated and squeaky. "Good 
gracious, man," said one of them, "why don't you have your bag- 
pipe repaired?" "Have, mon, ye dinna understand," was the reply. 
"If my bagpipes wor in good tune the inn mon wadna give me twa 
shillin's to move on." 

— The weary-looking class made a desperate effort to pull itself 
together. "Put a little originality in your answers!" grumbled the 
teacher. "Now, what bird is it that builds its nest on the ground?" 
"The chicken, sir." ventured one lad. hopefully. With a despondent 
air the teacher asked another. "What is it that a bird can do that I 
am unable to do? Now, come on, boys," he urged; "that's easy 
enough!" At last one scholar held up his hand. "Well, what is it?" 
asked the harassed one. "Lay an egg, sir," came the answer. 
•¥ * * 

I he teacher gazed sorrowfully at the small boy who stood in 
fronl of her, for notwithstanding he was her favorite pupil, he was 
convicted of the henious charge of a theft of candy from one of his 
schoolfellows. As it was his first offence, however, she did not desire 



to inflict corporal punishment — a moral lecture, she thought, would 
fit the case. "Bear in mind, Bobbie," she concluded, "that these 
temptations can be resisted if determination is used. Always turn a 
deaf ear to temptation." The child gazed solemnly at her. "But, 
teacher," he exclaimed, "I ain't got a deaf ear." 



DEFENDS MRS. EDDY AND CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 

The following letter has been received by the San Francisco News 
Letter from Clifford P. Smith, manager of Christian Science Com- 
mittees on Publication, of Boston, Massachusetts: 

"Since you have given circulation to what Sir Arthur Conan Doyle 
recently said against Mrs. Eddy and Christian Science, I must ask you 
to give equal publicity to this comment and refutation: 

" 'The practice of Christian Science does not involve suggestion. 
The practice and the teaching of this religion are utterly opposed to 
the production of results by the suggestions of the so-called human 
mind. In the practice of Christian Science, results are produced solely 
by the exercise of spiritual power derived from God — solely by spir- 
itual causation acting through spiritual law. As Mrs. Eddy has said 
on page 206 of the same book, it is the province of spiritual sense to 
govern man.' " 



REGARDING TRAFFIC 

As regards the question of traffic in large cities, Police Commis- 
sioner Enright of New York comes forward with a suggestion to 
eliminate the sidewalks on Fifth avenue and Broadway, and give 
the whole width of the streets to vehicular traffic. To care for the 
pedestrians, he would have the sidewalks built along the first floors 
of the stores allowing them to display goods on an arcade effect. 
This idea was suggested by the San Francisco News Letter several 
years ago. -•-- JJB 



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8 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER February 3, 1923 

TO " 

This is the Life-As Seen on the Screen J 

By KITTY PARSONS 




IF LIFE were only always as' perfect and full of divine thrills 
as it is on the screen! None of the things that trouble us poor 
mortals ever seems to bother any of those who move in the magic 
midst of the movies. 

Just look at the advantages! Everyone has plenty of servants 
and most of them work eighteen or twenty hours a day and stay on 
for thirty or forty years. And how lucky the servants are, too! 
The cook usually marries the fiance of the daughter of the house, 
who has observed her great beauty, while courting her mistress's 
millions. Love triumphs and she leaves her electric cooking at- 
tachments for wider fields. 

Sometimes the parlor maid borrows milady's magnificent even- 
ing clothes and appears at the masked ball in person— the un- 
known and uninvited guest. And when she races away on the 
stroke of midnight, to get in before the third butler locks her out, 
the hero seizes her diamond buckled slipper, or an emerald and 
platinum bar pin, or some other simple little trifle as a keepsake. 
This leads to future meetings, which in the course of time leads 
eventually to the altar. 

And people live in gilded palaces with marble steps and a foot- 
man on every step. And they ring for help whenever they want 
to look at themselves in the mirror, or to turn over in bed. The 
marvel is that someone always answers the bells! 

And how wonderfully — oh, how very wonderfully, the pretty 
ladies dress in the movies! Afternoon dresses in the morning, even- 
ing dresses for breakfast, and diamonds and showers of spangles 
and lace and jeweled coronets at night! To show us that money 
is no object whatsoever, the most enterprising pretend they are 
clothes-hangers, and deck themselves from chin to heel with as much 
ornamentation as their feeble frames can support. Lace and trim- 
mings are evidently bought by the piece, pearls and diamonds by 
the yard, and ermine and sable wraps by the carload. Simplicity 
is a word unknown except to Pollyanna and the very few who 
still dare to prance through reel after reel in the scantiest of rags. 
Straight hair is absolutely taboo — even a simple wave seems to 
be considered out of date. The tighter the curl, the more delighted 
the movie queen. Even the men have their hair Marcelled at least 
twice a day. 

And how strong the men are — and how brave! Three thousand 
bandits are a mere nothing for the hero to hold at bay while the 
heroine walks ten or twenty miles for help. And if the villian is 
twice his size he can still knock him down by lightly tapping his 
fingers on the big brute's chest. 

Few people have to climb slowly to the top of the ladder; if a man 
has had a hard time getting a job, he is made president of the 
company in the next reel, to show us what really can be done. But 
even now, when he is way up on top of the heap, he is never with- 
out a pistol in the pocket of his dress suit; the old habit of self- 
protection is still strong upon him. Who knows when he may need 
the worthy weapon? Surely no modern movie is complete without 
a few murders on the side! And we must not forget the high hat, 
which the hero so often wears in the house — probably to impress 
the audience. 

If we could only be as lucky as the heroine! She can go any- 
where in the world unharmed and she knows not the meaning of the 



word fear. Her beautiful curls are allowed to hang gracefully down 
her back till the tender age of forty-five, at which time she usually 
bobs her hair and begins her second childhood. If she is lost in 
the woods she lies there unconscious till the hero comes and finds 
her; if she falls from her prancing steed, he always happens to be 
passing in his new roadster (no one but a comedian ever rides in 
a car that is more than three months old, in the movies) at just 
the right moment to save her life. 

Is there anything more touching than the beautiful family affec- 
tion in the movies! Darling daughter never goes across the street 
to borrow an egg without first kissing everyone in the family at 
least five times. Brother and sister rush into each other's arms (in- 
stead at each other's throat) and hang about each other's necks 
for long intervals of speechless devotion. Friend cannot speak to 
friend without leaning upon him during the conversation. Every- 
one paws everyone else with a great overwhelming spasm of super- 
affection. The few people who still shake hands instead of kiss- 
ing each other, seize both hands and hold them for at least fifteen 
minutes at a time. The outside world seems a very cold-hearted 
place after observing the beautiful demonstrations of affection which 
are going on every day — on the screen. 

The villain is much more easily recognized than he is in life, 
because he almost always wears a black moustache. If the ends of 
the moustache are waxed you may know that he is no ordinary 
villain, but really a very select and refined specimen of the species. 
If he is trying to fascinate the heroine he usually adds a monocle 
with a black ribbon. 

No young man who is in lcve should overlook the opportunity 
which the screen cffers him today. He can receive more pointers 
in one reel than most men absorb in a lifetime. Step by step he 
may follow the picture of love's young dream in almost any picture. 
No young man whose intentions are matrimony, should fail to 
gather many valuable suggestions in this line or artistry. The meth- 
ods of the cave-man always receive a great deal of attention in the 
movies, many new twists having been added to the early approved 
mode of the early Stone Age. 

Always, under all circumstances, the lost are found — in the movies. 
No matter to what den of iniquity the heroine has been dragged, 
she is always discovered in plenty of time by the hero himself. She 
leads a sort of charmed life, and no matter how terrible the tor- 
tures to which she has submitted, she is always unharmed. She may 
go foodless and roofless for days, but when the hero appears she 
completely revives and they go out to dinner and a dance as soon 
as they change their clothes. There are no weak women — on the 
screen at least. 

Coincidence is a powerful factor in all phases of movie life. Five 
thousand miles may separate them, but the hero and heroine al- 
ways run into each other at the one point of the globe where they 
never dreamed the other would be. And the young man who sees 
a beautiful girl in a street car in Flatbush, buys a necktie from her 
ten days later in Philadelphia or Albany. You soon realize that 
people are never "ships that pass in the night" in the movies. They 
are always sure to land at the same wharf sooner or later. 

Il is all so wonderfully simple thai ll *eeins as if we ought to be 
able to do the same thing ourselves. Nothing is ever dull or com- 
monplace for anyone very long — on the screen. 



February 3. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




THE REAL REFORMER 

Not lie, the statesman, whatsoe'er his name, 

Who would strip Life of all adventurousness, 

Of all but arrow-proof and storm-proof dress, 

Making it more and more ignobly tame. 

Poorer in perils which they that overcame 

Were braced and manned by — making it less and less 

The school of heroes armed for struggle and stress, 

Not he shall win hereafter radiant fame. 

But when some dauntless teller of truth unsweet 

Shall shake the slumberous People, with rude power, 

To a vast New Birth of all the soul and mind, 

Him, and none other, at the destined hour, 

Him, quick or dead, the thunderous thanks shall greet, 

Not of his country alone, but of his kind. 

—By William Watson. 



FRAGMENT 



Why should we set these hearts of ours above 

The rest, and cramp them in possession's clutch? 
Poor things, we gasp and strain to capture love. 

And in our hands, it powders at our touch. 
We turn the fragrant pages of the past, 

Mournful with scent of passion's faded flow'rs. 
On every one we read, "Love cannot last," — 

So how could ours? 

It is the quest that thrills, and not the gain, 

The mad pursuit, and not the cornering: 
Love caught is but a drop of April rain. 

But bloom upon the moth's translucent wing. 
Why should you dare to hope that you and I 

Could make love's fitful flash a lasting flame? 
Sitll, if you think it's only fair to try — 

Well, I am game. 

(From Life) 



SEA-BLUE EYES 



I stare at you, Ianthe. since you ask. 

Because your eyes look, brimmed with fervid blue. 

Like disks of crystal in a tinted mask 

Which (he intense V.sf.:n gazes through. 

— By Elinor V ylie, 



So, said the old general, "you think you would make a good 
valet for an old wreck like me. do you? I have a glass eye. a 
wooden leg, and a wax arm that need looking after, not to mention 
false teeth and so forth." 

"Oh. that's all right, mi." replied the applicant, enthusiastically; 
"I"' had lots ol experience. 1 worked Foi six years in the as- 
sembling department of a motorcar factory." 



FILM FLICKS 

BY AGNES KERR CRAWFORD 

The Belasco Productions have opened their own distributing offices 
in New York at 1600 Broadway. They will handle their own pro- 
ductions for world-wide distribution, also other pictures considered 
worthy of being given to the world under the famous name of Be- 
lasco. An efficient sales force has been formed and service will 
begin at once with "The Eyes of Youth," first picture made by the 
Belasco Productions, and which has been given a most enthusi- 
astic reception by the film men of New York. Edward Belasco has 
just returned to San Francisco from New York, and work on the 
company's second picture will begin at once. 

Ip t£ ^ 

The Pallas Photo Players, Inc., have been added to the rapidly 
growing list of San Francisco producing corporations. H. K Weiden- 
feld and Wayne Mack are at the head of the company, and the busi- 
ness offices are in the Chronicle Building. They expect to begin pro- 
duction in the very near future, the title of their first picture to be 
announced a little later. 

Clarence Badger, director, with R. C' Moore, production superin- 
tendent, Carey Wilson, scenario writer, and R. Banqquest, camera 
man, all of the Goldwyn forces, spent several days in San Francisco 
lately. They were looking up locations for "The Rear Car," a pic- 
ture version of the play of the same name soon to be filmed by Gold- 
wyn. It will be remembered that Richard Bennett produced the stage 
play in this city early in the fall. 

King Vidor has been in San Francisco at work on the script for 
the screen version of "The Three Wise Fools," from the famous play 
of the same name. 

# * * 

Craig Hutchinson, director, and his company finished work a few 
days ago at the new Gerson Studio, 1924 Page street, on "The Blind 
Goddess," first of a series of two-reel pictures being made from Peter 
B. Kyne's stories published in the Saturday Evening Post. Work on 
the second picture will be begun at once. 

# .y. ¥ 

The Northern California Photo Play expedition to South America 
has been reported safely on their way as far as Balboa. Four more 
men will sail on the Columbia on January 30 to join them with 
supplies, rifles, ammunition, a second camera, films, clothing, ma- 
terial for the construction of boats, etc. The company will also start 
a second picture-making expedition in two months, to the Congo 
district of South Africa. 

* # * 

Hobart Henley, director from Universal City, is in town for the 
opening of "The Flirt." which he directed, and to select some San 
Francisco scenes for the finishing touches to the picture he has made 
from Jack London's story, "The Abysmal Brute." 

* * * 

Ted Taylor, publicity man for Goldwyn, arrived in San Fran- 
cisco a few days ago to be added to the staff assisting Eric Von 
Stroheim in the preparations for the filming here in the near fu- 
ture of "McTague." from Frank Norris' story of the same name. 
I f I 

Cullen Landis and Robert Lewis have been signed by Max Graf, 
of the Graf Productions, for the forthcoming production of "The 
Fog," from William Dudley Pelley's book of the same name. Work 
on the picture will begin at tin- Pacjfic studios .it San Mateo in a 
^ery short time. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 3, 1923 




— So we have a woman congressman. That is how it should be, 
seeing that we have the suffrage and therefore must have women 
associates in our government. There could be no one more fitted 
under the circumstances than Mrs. Nolan. She has been in con- 
stant association with public life in Washington for a number of 
years and her friendships and connections there must prove of great 
benefit to her in the carrying out of the plans she has for the de- 
velopment of this state and of this community. She has not been 
associated with political campaigning and there is consequently a 
fresh sweetness about her which our usual political women have 
long ago lost or discarded. We could have wished her a life with 
greater possibilities of happiness and content but since she has 
chosen this, or rather since the people have chosen it for her, we 
tender our congratulations and hope that Washington will return 
to us as sweet a personality as we are sending to Washington. 
Meanwhile it will be for her "toil and tribulation and tumult of her 
war." 

— Oakland still maintains its place as the rural annex to San 
Francisco and in spite of its recent growth and very impressive 
numbers keeps along in maundering perseverance on the old cow 
trail, at least as regards liberality of spirit. Judge Samuels is of 
Oakland and Judge Samuels is the author of the bill known as 
the anti-vamping bill, which he declares is aimed at the aliena- 
tion of affection, a legislative act which will set out to curb the 
wandering of desire at its very best, and at its worst tend to render 
all friendship between the sexes except on a commercial or mat- 
rimonial plane, criminal and punishable by imprisonment. No won- 
der it is thought to be a humorous measure. Still the fact of its 
stupidity will not prevent it passing. Lots of women will line up 
behind it and the politicians may easily be scared into one more 
assault upon the liberty of the individual, who having been shack- 
led thoroughly physically is now threatened with spiritual slavery. 

— Where is the man who will have the force and ability to call 
the attention of the community to the waste of natural resources 
which is continually going on in the state, and in face of which 
the proposed economy plan for which the governor makes himself 
responsible, is a mere trifle? There is an irrationality in the con- 
duct of affairs, with a wantonness in the consumption of material, 
which too closely resembles the irresponsibility of a mining camp, 
to be pleasant. The whole life of the community depends on the 
measure of conservation of resources which can be put into force 
without meanness. And we have two or three men in this city whose 
clearness of vision would help enormously. Time was when the 
able voice of Gavin McNab might have been heard on these mat- 
ters but professional success no doubt devours him, and renders 
him less accessible to the others of us who need him. 

— Upon what grounds does the Commonwealth Club constitute 
itself the Admiral Crichton of our municipal life? Any question 
that comes up is referred to one or another of its representative 
committees and presto, no matter how difficult, complicated or tech- 
nical, the decision leaps out, without a backward glance or even 
a modest blush. And yet one wonders. There is a certain, what 
shall we say. "self-conscious pertness," about these solutions that 
are reminiscent of that dazzling brilliancy, which the clever adole- 
cent, of whom we never hear anything further, is wont to display. 



We concede the ability of the members of the club, their patrio- 
tism, their civic virtue, but we cannot admit their omniscience. We 
have seen some of them swimming and they look very much like 
other people; in fact some of them look most disappointingly like 

other people. 

* * * 

— By the recent death of George W. Turner of the Bohemian 
Club we lose a noted and very discreet book collector. Very sel- 
dom did he make a mistake and the collection which he has left 
is a credit to his judgment, as much in a literary way as in a com- 
mercial. For book collecting has an esthetic side which is fre- 
quently overlooked by the speculator in mere values and it has 
also a commercial side which the esthete is very likely to ignore. 
The gentleman to whom we pay our tribute of respect had a sub- 
tle knowledge which amounted almost to an instinct for books, 
their value as art-products and their actual value in cash, both 
now and in the future. Book collectors have always been unusu- 
ally lovely people. They seem to absorb something which a mere 
librarian seldom has. There is probably no better or more elevat- 
ing pursuit for a man of means, and it does not need great wealth. 
We recommend it cheerfully to our well-to-do people and should 
love to be able to follow our own advice. 



FRAGMENT 

And there arrives a lull in the hot race 
Wherein he doth for ever chase 
That flying and elusive shadow, Rest. 
An air of coolness plays upon his face. 
And an unwonted calm prevades his breast. 

And then he thinks he knows 
The Hills where his life rose. 
And the Sea where it goes. 

— Matthew Arnold. 



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t H H pKK KH S^'HKHK« M H 5? H Hjt K H H »): « «.» « « « « K B X.» ^ 



February 3, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 




A FEBRUARY BOOK CHAT 

ByKEM 

READERS are interested in comparing two very characteristic 
lists of the best six novels of 1922, viz., one by William Lyon 
Phelps, an American educator and critic: 

Leading American novels of 1922: Adrienne Toner, by Anne 
Douglas Sedgwick; Vandemark's Folly, by Herbert Quick; Saint 
Teresa, by Henry Sydnor Harrison; Bennett Malin, by Elsie Sing- 
master; Babbitt, by Sinclair Lewis; CeTtain People of Importance, 
by Kathleen Norris; and the six best American novels of 1922 — 
chosen by Hugh Walpole: Babbitt, by Sinclair Lewis; Cytharea, 
by Joseph Hergersheimer; One of Ours, by Willa Cather; Peter 
Whiffle, by Carl Van Vechten; Old Crow, by Alice Brown; The 
Boy Grew Older, by Heywood Broun. 

It will be seen the distinguished American and English critics only 
agree on one novel, viz., Babbitt — and since the seal of approval 
has been so openly affixed upon this novel, and especially since in 
English reviews Mr. Babbitt is openly described as "a typical Amer- 
ican business man" — disturbed women readers are taking a new 
appraisal of their respective husbands, who will very likely be put 
through an uncomfortable "soul-growing" process in order to take 
them out of the crude Babbitt class, if they are found (as very 
likely they will be) having any of his unpopular earmarks. 

THIS FREEDOM, by A. S. M. Hutchinson. Is still the subject of 
much discussion. "Not nearly so interesting as IF WINTER COMES." 
"He's completely failed to prove his point — why, many women who 
stay at home all the time have children who turn out badly!' many 
women exclaim. "No, that isn't what he's trying to get over; he 
means that any woman, whether she stays home or whether she goes 
in for a business career, will lose her children unless she makes com- 
panions of them, can't you see?" "Well, any way, he certainly has 
made a very English mess of his last book." And so the novel-readers 
chatter on, but the demand is still on for it and the libraries have 
long lists and if one wants to get up a little excitement it's a name 
to conjure with. Little, Brown & Co. — $2. 

* * * 

THE HEAD OF THE HOUSE OF COOMBE and ROBIN, by 

Francis Hodgson Burnett, are still very popular books both on the 
counters and in the libraries. JUDITH OF GODDESS VALLEY, by 
Honore Willsie, a romance of the real West, though not so popular as 
THE ENCHANTED CANYON, by the same author, has made its own 
impression and readers remember many of its epigrammatic sentences 
such as, "These people are of New England stock. The farther a New 
Englander gets from religion the more brutal his virtues become. 
Stokes.- $2. 

OLD CROW, by Alice Brown, is given place among the "Six Best 
Novels of the Year" by Hugh Walpole. ANNE SEVERN AND THE 
FIELDINGS is one of May Sinclair's characteristic novels. And MIL- 
LIONS, by Ernest Poole, stands out as another of this well-known 
writer's novels with a purpose. All MacMillan Company books. — $2. 

* * ■ 

THE BURNS-MANTLE COLLECTION OF POPULAR PLAYS 

running in New York for 1922 comes opportunely to satisfy a popu- 
lar demand. Small Maynard Company. — $2. 



THE BOY GREW OLDER, by Heyward Broun, has been received 
with much interest both because he has distinguished himself in other 
fields and "because he has drawn two of the most charming boys — 
father and son —in modern fiction" to quote an enthusiastic English 
critic. WHEN THE SUN SWINGS NORTH, by Barratt Willoughby, 
a local writer, is quoted by readers as a very interesting Northern 
story. Putnam. — $2. 

CARNAC'S FOLLY, by Sir Gilbert Parker, a story which has 
pleased many readers so that they have not compared it regretfully 

with THE RIGHT OF WAY. Lippincott.— $2. 

WHELPS OF THE WOLF, by George Marsh, has also aroused the 
interest of lovers of outdoor stories and they are searching for other 
stories by this writer. Penn. — $1.75. 

BATOUALA, the Concourt prize winner, by a negro, Rene Marin 
Seltzer — $1 .75 — and 

TALES OF THE JAZZ AGE, by W. Scott Fitzgerald, and VALI- 
ANT DUST, by Katherine Gerould, are popular collections of short 
stories. Scribner. — $1.75. 



Books 
239 P 


that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

ost Street San Francisco 



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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 3, 1923 




ociot 




BUSY Cl'PID 

HOPKINS-BRUNE — Announcement is made of the marriage of 
Miss Marjorie Snow Hopkins and Walter C. Brune, son of 
Mrs. Henry Brune of San Francisco, the ceremony having 
taken place in Manila on January 2, at the home of Captain 
and Mrs. H. L. Heath. The bride left here in December for 
the islands, being accompanied by Mrs. Brune, mother of the 
bridegroom. She is the daughter of Mrs. B. E. Hopkins of 
Boston and a sister of Mrs. John Boardman of Los Angeles. 
Mr. Brune, who is well known in San Francisco, is a brother 
of Mrs. Alan Van Fleet and of Henry Brune Jr. of this city. 
He is the representative of an oil company in Manila. 

HARRISON-VAN DER LECK — Miss Agnes Harrison, who will be- 
come the bride of Mr. Hallock van der Leek of Los Angeles 
on February 21, entertained at an informal tea on Saturday 
afternoon at her home in Washington street in honor of Miss 
Frances Johnson, who recently announced her engagement 
to Mr. Russell Vought. The guests included a score or more 
of the bride-to-be's intimate friends. Miss Johnson is the 
daughter of Mrs. James Ward and a younger sister of Mrs. 
Matthew Dillingham I Helen Johnson Emrich I , whose mar- 
riage was an event of recent interest in society, and Mr. 
Frederick Johnson. 

FLETCHER-HUBBELL — News of the engagement of Miss Sybil 
Avery Fletcher, daughter of Rear Admiral Frank F. Fletcher, 
U. S. N, and Mrs. Fletcher, to Lieutenant Reginald Worth 
Hubbell. U. S. A., has come as a delightful surprise to navy 
society in the west as well as in New York, where the an- 
nouncement was made two w r eeks ago. The bride-elect is a 
debutante in New York society and is exceptionally attractive 
as well as accomplished. Her fiance is the son of the late 
Brigadier General Henry W. Hubbell, U. S. A. He is a grad- 
uate of West Point in the class of 1920. 

LUNCHEONS 

CREEL, — Mrs. Richard Creel gave a luncheon at her home at 
Angel Island Friday. Dr. Creel is the surgeon at the immi- 
gration station at the island and he and Mrs. Creel have re- 
cently arrived from Washington, D. C. Dr. Creel is a brother 
of Mr. George Creel. 

MONTEAGLE — On Friday of last week Mrs. Louis F. Mont- 
eagle gave a luncheon at her home in Pacific avenue in honor 
of Mrs. Whitelaw Reid. Mrs. Whitelaw Reid is having a 
quiet visit at her home in Millbrae, where she is spending 
this month and next. Her visitors are informally entertained 
and she accepts invitations to small gatherings only. 

DAVIS — Mrs. Francis H. Davis entertained at a luncheon Mon- 
day at the Fairmont Hotel in honor of her daughter-in-law, 
Mrs. Gaston Bolado Ashe, who will return to her home in 
Los Angeles the end of this week after a several weeks' visit 
in San Francisco as the guest of her mother, Mrs. Herbert 
Younger. 

RUGGLES — In honor of Miss Annette Rnggles, who will become 
the bride of Mr. Arthur Boole Wellington on February IT, 
Mrs. John Dempster McKee and Mrs. Winfield Scott Davis 
entertained at a luncheon on Saturday at the Francisca Club. 

NEWHALL — Mr. and Mrs. George A. Newhall entertained some 
friends at a luncheon party at their home in Burlingame 
Monday, among them being: Messrs and Mesdames Walter 
G. Filer, Charles W. Clark, Joseph O. Tobin. Walter S. Mar- 
tin, Templeton Crocker, George Cameron, John S. Drum, 
Robert Hayes Smith, Mountford S. Wilson. 

TEAS 

CEBRIAN — Mr. and Mrs. Louis de Laveaga Cebrian gave a 
christening party Monday at which their son, Juan Crofton 
Cebrian, was baptized, the ritual taking place at the Spanish 
Catholic Church and the tea at the Crofton home. Mrs. St. 
John E. McCormick, an aunt of the baby, and Ralph Cebrian, 
an uncle, stood for the child, the latter standing by proxy 
for Juan C. Cebrian, the child's grandfather, who is now in 
Spain. 

CLARK — Mrs. Warren Dearborn Clark entertained al tea al her 
home on Washington street on Friday afternoon. 

GWYNN — Miss Cornelia Gwynn gave a bridge tea at her Jackson 
street home Wednesday. 



STONEY — Miss Katherine Stoney, who is to be one of the brides- 
maids at the marriage of Miss Miriam Trowbridge and J. 
Paul Kirk of Los Angeles, which takes place at St. Luke's 
Church on February 7, gave an informal tea for Miss Trow- 
bridge at her home. 

DINNERS 

WELCH — Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Welch entertained at a dinner 
on Thursday evening at their home in Burlingame, when 
Miss Lenore Armsby was the guest of honor. Miss Armsby 
and her uncle. Mr. Raymond Armsby. will take their de- 
parture next week for the Atlantic Coast, where the debutante 
will join her parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Armsby, at their 
home in Long Island. 

CROCKER — Miss Mary Julia Crocker and her brother, Harry 
Crocker, entertained at a small dinner at the Hotel St. Francis 
Monday evening in honor of three of the winter's deputantes. 
Miss Frances Ames, Miss Josephine Drown and Miss Lenore 
Armsby. The party included Miss Ames, Miss Drown, Miss 
Armsby, Mr. and Mrs. James Moffitt, Warren Clark. Jerd Sulli- 
van and Alfred Hendrickson. 

PORTER — Dr. and Mrs. Langley Porter gave a dinner at their 
home Tuesday evening. 

LUND — In honor 'of Prince Waldemar of Denmark, the consul 
general of Denmark and Mrs. Fin Lund entertained at a 
dinner on Saturday evening at their home in Pacific avenue. 

FRICK — Mr. and Mrs. Walter Frick had a small dinner dance 
party at the Palace on Saturday night, having a little coterie 
that exchanges turns in having such affairs. With them were 
Messrs. and Mesdames Wickham Havens, Frank Proctor. 
Archibald Proctor, Edward Engs. William Cavalier. 

DE LA TOUR — Miss Helene de Latour, daughter of .Mr. and Mrs. 
Georges de Latour. entertained a group of her young friends 
at a dinner Thursday evening. 

MOFFITT — Dr. and Mrs. Herbert Moffitt will entertain at dinner 
at their home this Saturday. 

BEARDSLEY — .Miss Barbara Beardsley, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. George P. Beardsley of San Rafael, entertained more 
than a score of her young friends at bridge and supper at 
her home in Marin Wednesday evening. 

DANCES 

EASTON — Miss Jane Easton. who makes her home at the Fair- 
mont Hotel with her parents. Air. and Mrs. Ansel Easton. 
entertained a party of young friends at the Club Royal on 
Saturday evening. 

FLEISHHACKER — Mr. and Mis. Mortimer Fleishhacker enter- 
tained fifty young people at a dinner dancp last Friday even- 
ing in the Italian room of the St. Francis, as a compliment to 
their young daughter. .Miss Eleanor Fleishhacker. 

IX TOWN AND OUT 

LOWE — Mrs. Barbara Lowe has arrived in San Francisco for a 
brief stay and is at the Fairmont Hotel. She will be here 
for ten days or two weeks and during her visit will be the 
incentive for a series of a Hairs given in her honor. Mrs. 
Lowe is a sister-in-law of Mrs. William Matson of this city. 

HEWARD-PARKER — Mrs. John H. Parker (Julia Langhornei 
and Mrs. Chilion Heward [Maizee Langhornei arrived in 
San Francisco Tuesday from their respective homes on the 
Atlantic Coast and in Canada. The former San Franciscans 
have been called west on account of the sad tidings of I lie 
death of their father. Mr. James Potter Langhorne. which 
occurred on Friday at his home in Pacific avenue. 




' 'ruler the guidance of R. 11. Collins and his as- 
sociates, the Peerless was bound to lie a better 
and better Peerless. The public response came 
quickly and is indicated by augmented sales in old 
Peerless strongholds and throughout the country 
in general. 

Pioneer Motor Company 

Oh' SAN FRANCISCO 

1900 Van Ness Ave., Corner Washington St. 
Telephone Prospect 8800 



February 3, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 






SMITH — Mrs. Walter Smith departed Tuesday tor two or three 
weeks' stay in Grass Valley, whirr she will be the guest of 
Mrs. Georgl \V. Starr. Mrs. Starr is connected with the Bourn 
family and is one of the old residents of Crass Valley. 

SHTJMAN — A royal welcome is being accorded Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Shnman. who arrived here Saturday after a honeymoon 
trip through the east and south. Mr anil Mrs. Shuman are 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. William Hendrickson Jr. at their home 
on Russian Hill, and they will he with them until they secure 
their own future residence. As Miss Cornelia Clampett, Mrs. 
Shuman was a great favorite in the younger circles of San 
Francisco. 

HOWARD — Mrs. John Howard has arrived in New York, where 
she has joined her husband, Sidney Howard, the distinguished 
young playwright. Mrs. Howard was here for some time and 
was the house guest of her son-in-law and daughter, Mr. 
and Mrs. Duncan McDuffle in Berkeley. 

KUHN — Mrs. William S. Kuhn will leave in a fortnight for Palm 
Beach, Fla., where she will join her sister, Mrs. William B. 
Skaife, and her daughters. Miss Katherine and Miss Marianne 
Kuhn. Mrs. Skaife has a home at Palm Beach and usually 
passes the latter part of the winter there. Mrs. Kuhn will re- 
turn to California after a several weeks' stay in Florida and 
the Misses Kuhn will go abroad with their aunt for a few 
months' stay, and on their return will come to California. 

MURPHY — Mrs. Daniel T. Murphy returned last Friday from 
New York, where she spent several months. The pleasure of 
her eastern trip was marred by a serious illness. She was 
accompanied to this coast hy a trained nurse and is now at 
her home in Van Ness avenue. 

CARROLL — Mr. and Mrs. Paul T. Carroll left Wednesday for 
New York. They will sail early in February for Europe, to 
be away for several months. 

DB MORAN — Mrs. Cordelia de Moran of San Salvador, a sister 
of Mrs. Encarnaccion Mejia of this city, is passing the winter 
here with her three daughters, the Misses Margherita, Blanche 
and Cordelia de Moran, at the Hotel Bellevue. 

INTIMATIONS 

MONTEAGLE — Mr. and Mrs. Louis Findley Monteagle will leave 
in a day or two for New York, via the Panama canal, to be 
absent from San Francisco for several months. 

DOYLE — Mr. and Mrs. Richard Doyle (Gladys Sullivan), who 
have been spending their honeymoon abroad, sailed for home 
last Friday. During the greater part of their stay in Europe 
Mr. and Mrs. Doyle were the guests of Mrs. Doyle's brother, 
Mr. Noel Sullivan, at his apartment in Paris. Mrs. Doyle is 
the niece of Miss Mary Louise Phelan and Mr. James D. Phe- 
lan and her marriage was one of the interesting events of the 
early part of the winter. 

CROCKER — Mrs. William H. Crocker left Monday for New York, 
where she will remain for several days and will then sail 
for France. On her arrival in Euro]"' she will go directly 
to Paris, where she will visit her son-in-law and daughter. 
Count and Countess Andre de Limur. She will be joined in 
the French capital by her daughter, Miss Helen Crocker, dur- 
ing the early part of March. Miss Crocker will be accom 
panied abroad by Mrs. William Gregory Parrott It was Miss 
Crocker's and Mrs. Parrotfs original plan to accompany Mrs. 
Crocker abroad, but they decided to postpone their trip until 
a latter tlate. They will leave lor New York and Europe the 
latter part of February, and on her arrival in Europe Mrs 
Parrotl will visit Miss Barbara Parrot! and Mr. Stephen Par- 

rott in Paris. Both Mrs. Crocker .mil her daughter and Mrs. 
Parrott plan to remain abroad for several months. 
NICKEL — Mrs. .1. Leroy Nickel win entertain at a children's 
party on February li in honor of three of tier grandchildren. 

The party will be a Valentine affair and will take place at 
the Nickel home in this city. The little honor guests "ill 
be Miss Sallie anil Miss Mary Ernestine Nickel, the children 
of Mr. and Mrs. George Nickel, and Master Henry Bowels, 

the son of Mr. and Mrs i: 'ge Bowels 

KYNNERSLEY — Mr. and Mrs. .1. K. S Kynnersley and their 
daughter. Miss Edith Kynnersley, who have been occup 
a cottage at Coronado for several months, will return to San 
Francisco during the month of Februarj 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 



Van NeM Ave., mi in-iiri street 

is tin- must refined family hotel in ti" - city 

I I Ml It M. WOODS" KV llanaRtr 



-\\ VRAM l-l o 



(iORGAS Captain Milet Gorgas and bis daughter. Misa Marj 

;as, who have been spending the winter at Coronado and 

ari expected to return to San Francisco tie' latter pari of 

this month, have released their apartment at the St. Xavi.-r 
and will remain in Coronado until the early part of June. 
JOHNSON- Mr and Mrs. Archibald Johnson are en route home 
from Europe. The Leet-.lohnson wedding was an evenl of 
hist fall. The Johnsons will make their home at the Fair- 
mont Hotel for a time until they decide on their permanent 
home. 

Mai MONAGLE — Mrs. Beverley MacMonagle, who has been visit- 
ing in San Francisco for several months, will return to Paris 
on February 10. Mrs. MacMonagle formerly made her home 
in San Francisco, but for a number of years has lived in Paris, 
where she has entertained the visiting Californians who, on 
their travels, have visited in the French capital. 

ANDERSON — Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bartow Anderson will join 
the host of American tourists abroad this spring. Mr. and 
Mrs. Anderson, whose home in San Rafael has been closed 
this winter, took their departure on Friday morning for the 
east and will sail on the steamer Berengeria on February 20. 
They plan to stop in Chicago and in New York for brief visits 
before sailing. 

CROCKER — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Templeton Crocker will go 
abroad in April to pass the summer months in Europe. 

ST. FRANCIS — Mrs. Walter Filer was hostess at lunch to a group 
including Mrs. Thomas Eastland, Mrs. Ross Ambler Curran 
and Mrs. George Newhali. 

Mrs. Charles Templeton Crocker, Miss Helen Crocker, Mrs. 
Arthur Rose Vincent. Mrs. Mountford Wilson, Mrs. George 
Cameron and Mrs. Laurance I. Scott were one of the attractive 
groups in the Garden. Mrs. Crocker was especially lovely in 
a frock of black crepe embroidered in Oriental colors matched 
with a small toque combining black and Persian silk. 
Mr. Raymond Armsby was host at one of the tables, his guests 
including Mr. and Mrs. Will Parrott and Mrs. D. C. Jackling. 

DEL MONTE — The first annual Pebble Beach women's golf 
championship, set for the seaside course on February 9 to 12, 
is assured to attract the classiest field yet recorded in Pacific 
Coast women's golf. The entry list of the stars so far con- 
sists of the following: Miss Marion Hollins, national cham- 
pion in 1921; Mrs. F. C. Letts Jr.. former western title holder 
and conqueror of Miss Cecil Leitch. the great English player; 
Mis. Win. C. Van Antwerp, many times California champion; 
Miss Doreen Kavanaugh, present state title holder; Miss 
Mary K. Browne. Del Monte champion and former national 
women's tennis queen; Miss Margaret Cameron, a former 
champion, and many others. 

The Pacific auto show golf tournament at Del Monte on Feb- 
ruary 9 to 11 is going to draw the rank and file of golfers 
from motor circles H. O. Harrison, chairman of the com- 
mittee making arrangements, has extended invitation to play 
to all automotive men of the Pacific Coast. This tournament 
is to take place on the historic Del Monte course. 



Thai was an admirable speech that Justice William H. Waste 
delivered at the Bar Association dinner, full of light quips and yet 
with an underlying seriousness which well maintained the dignity 
of the bench. And the dignity of the bench is something which is 
by no means always in evidence at the present time. Too often 
we meet with a flippancy and forced gaiety which are evidently in- 
tended to please the crowd. But in its heart even the crowd likes 
a certain staid humanity in the utterances of its ministers of jus- 
tice. Perhaps Judge Landis was the greatest sinner that the country 
has had in that respect and his influence was in many particulars 
quite debilitating. We are glad to see our justices maintaining the 
older and higher standards. But why on earth should Justice Waste 
have gone out of his way to give a definition of "supererogation"? 
No self-respecting judge ever knows anything of a word like that. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Suiter 6130 li.ier Management CARL S STANLEY 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 3, 1923 





I TlNflNCIAU 




Revival in Gold and Silver 
Mining in Nevada 



By P. N. BERINGER 



Those French Securities 

THAT there should be a falling off in the 
market of French securities of all kinds 
at this particular juncture goes without say- 
ing on account of the state of European 
affairs. French securities may be attacked 
in this way, but French securities, in the 
opinion of the most conservative members 
of bond houses and by bankers of repute, 
are about the most secure of all of the 
world's issues. It is only natural that, hav- 
ing attacked France, in every other way, 
clever manipulators should attack her in this 
way as well. Somebody with sense enough 
to realize that France has never, even in her 
darkest hour, repudiated a single obligation, 
is due to make some money. 



San Francisco Banks 

The San Francisco banks are in the very 
best condition and they are extending their 
help much more freely than they have in 
the immediate past. In other words, while 
money may not be said as yet to be "easy," 
it is much easier than it has been and the 
merchants and industrialists are getting the 
benefit of the better feeling there is in the 
circles of finance. Most of the banks are 
expending or have programs of expansion 
for adoption in the immediate future. Branch 
banks are being established in different parts 
of the city and many of the larger banks 
have established country connections. It is 
a strange thing this should be so because it 
is only a little while ago that bankers looked 
askance at the country bank, as an adjunct 
to the city bank business. There has, how- 
ever, come quite a change over banking 
affairs, since the establishment of the Fed- 
eral Reserve Bank, and ideas have changed 
with the changing times. It is now consid- 
ered except by the ultra conservative, per- 
fectly safe for a city bank to establish con- 
nections with banks in the country districts. 



The Agricultural Prospects 

The prospects for the agriculturists was 
never better than it is at this time. California 
is now face to face with the absolute surety 
of bumper crops for this year. Never be- 
fore have the rains been so beneficial. 



Manufacturing Interest 

The industrial factors in the San Francisco 
and California situation are in much better 
shape than they have been in a long time 
and manufacturing is going on in every di- 
rection. Oakland is fast becoming one of 
the well known manufacturing cities of the 
country. San Francisco is expanding its man- 
ufacturers and is extending its manufactur- 



ing sites to the southward along the pen- 
insula country. With the increase in hydro- 
electric power and the incoming of fresh 
labor elements, under the American plan, the 
manufacturers of this part of the country 
feel much encouraged and now do not seem 
to have fears of the paralyzing effect of 
strikes and lockouts. 



Shipping and Export 

The inter-coastal trade continues as briskly 
as ever and there is no seasonal break. As 
far as trans-Pacific shipping is concerned, 
business is increasing, except as to the Dutch 
East Indies and India where everything 
seems still as death. Business with Japan is 
increasing and Japan is distributing mer- 
chandise all over the Far Eastern country. 
Business with Central and South America 
is being stimulated by the efforts of the mer- 
chants and a new steamship line has been 
inaugurated to have regular sailings to Bra- 
zil and the east coast of South America. 
The Chamber of Commerce last week sent 
a delegation to Rio Janeiro to attend the 
world's fair at that place. This will result 
in great good to this country in general. 



Mining 

The situation in mining circles in Cali- 
fornia and Nevada is a healthy one and the 
outlook for great investment of capital in 
the coming season of active mining was 
never better. 



Arthur J. Hill, California manager for the 
State Life Insurance Company of Indiana, 
announces that Ira Homer, district field man- 
ager in Los Angeles, led the company's en- 
tire field force in December for personal 
production. Mr. Homer is one of the new 
life insurance men in California who has 
made a remarkable success. He joined the 
California agency in July of last year and 
is already rated as one of its Million Dollar 
members for 1923. His December produc- 
tion totalled over $300,000. 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 



COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 



Send for Our Market Letter, Just Out 



370 BuhIi Street 
Phone Kearny 1726 San Francisco, Cal. 



By HERMAN ZADIG 

THERE seems to be a great revival in 
gold and silver mining properties in the 
state of Nevada, judging from the latest 
reports to the effect that an English syndi- 
cate has taken over a number of properties 
on the Comstock Lode known as the middle 
group of mines. This group comprises the 
Gold & Curry, Savage, Hale & Norcross, 
Best & Belcher, Chollar and Potosi. 

This English syndicate is going to spend 
a large amount of money opening up the 
upper levels of this group of mines in order 
to ascertain how large a plant will be neces- 
sary to mill the ores they develop. 

This is a different syndicate from the one 
that took hold of the Gold Hill mines, and 
which syndicate erected a 2500 ton milling 
plant which was placed in operation about 
six months ago. 

There are two other deals going on now, 
and if they are consummated it will mean 
a large increase in the force of men em- 
ployed and a large output of gold and sil- 
ver. 

Just about the time the Comstock prop- 
erties are falling into the hands of eastern 
and foreign capital the Tonopah district, in 
the state of Nevada, is developing what looks 
like a revival of the Comstock Lode. In fact 
a number of mining men, familiar with the 
latest developments in Tonopah, predict that 
through the improved methods of working 
gold and silver ores the output may in time 
surpass the output from the Comstock Lode. 



Tonopah 

Tonopah is certainly the banner camp in 
Nevada today, when it comes to the produc- 
tion of gold and silver ores, and the de- 
velopments the Tonopah Extension has made 
in the past two years has been a great sur- 
prise to all mining engineers. With very few 
exceptions all of these men felt the mines 
in Tonopah would never develop large bodies 
of ore at depth. 

The unexpected always happens; and the 
great body of ore now being developed by 
the Tonopah Extension at a depth of 2000 
feet is something wonderful. It is reported 
by those who have inspected it that it is over 
seventy feet wide and they have followed 
it for over 500 feet, and have not yet reached 
its end. The values average at least $20. 

This seems to be the beginning of deep 
mining in Tonopah. It is similar to what 
took place many years ago on the Comstock, 
when the Crown Point and Belcher opened 
up a very rich body of ore on the 1200-foot 
level and later on the Consolidated Virginia 
and California opened up the bonanza ore 
body which yielded over $100,000,000, with 
this difference that they have the advantage of 
experience which the Comstock did not have 
and which proved very costly to them at 
times. 



February 3. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



VISIT 

"The 
Catacombs" 

AT 

CYPRESS LAWN 
CEMETERY 

City Office: 

995 Market St. 

San Francisco 

PHONES: SUTTER 695 

DOUGLAS 4772 



Enroll Now in 

COSGROVE'S SCHOOL 

of 

Hair Dressing 

and 

Beauty Culture 

A course in the above makes you in- 
dependent. See 

MR. AND MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Kearny 2842 



St. Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which Is important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1174 I'll dan Building San Francisco 



In llir lasl twenty live years there has 
been great improvements in the tools and 
machinery used in mining and milling which 
is done on a much larger scale. One of the 
latest improvements is the renewing of cya- 
nide after it has been used, which has cut 
down the cost of cyanidation very mater- 
ially. 

Mining has come down to a science and 
offers just as good a chance for investment 
as many industrial and other enterprises. 
With this difference: in a mining deal, out- 
side of earning good interest on money in' 
vested, there is always a chance of develop- 
ing large bodies of ore which would cause 
a great advance in the shares of the dif- 
ferent companies. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

A private view and reception will be held 
Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the 
Palace of Fine Arts, February 2, on the oc- 
casion of the opening of the following exhi- 
bitions: The first annual traveling exhibi- 
tion of selected works by western painters; 
the National Gallery Loan exhibition of war 
portraits by eminent American painters, and 
an unveiling of a full-sized marble facsimile 
of the famous group "The Laocoon," which 
is being presented to the museum by the Hon. 
James D. Phelan. 



PACIFIC <;as AND klectric company 



:t4(h Consecutive Quarterly Dividend on 
First Preferred Stock 

THE regular dividend, for the three 
months ending January 31st, 1923, of 
$1.50 per share, upon the full-paid First 
Preferred Capital Stock of the Company 
will he paid on February 15th, 1923, to 
shareholders of record at the end of the 
quarterly period. Checks will be mailed 
in lime to reach stockholders on the date 
they are payable. 

A. P. HOCKENBBAMBR, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 
San Francisco. California. 



Quality 1S6S--66 Years— 1922 Quantity 
Our Service Includes Following- Places: 

liurllntKmr Redwood City Henlo Park 
San Mateo Woodtlde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works : 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

Han FranclMto Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo MS8 

Kronomy Durability 



Few People Take Proper Care of Their Teeth 

Home think thai » vigor chin l> running once 
or twice » day U taking very good care 

of (hem. Bl-U Baling in only a part of the 

proccHri, Many thlngti can happon to your 

teetll which only a competent dentist inn 
take rare of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not he as sound as you Imagine. 
A toothache means trouhle; do not wait 
for Hie ache. Watch your teeth and Kums. 
There are t-nin troubles that will destroy 
teeth faster than decay. Are your teetll 
sore'.' Do your minis bleed? (all In today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My 
nerve blocking system blocks oft' all nerve's 
and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Garfield 835 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; 
Self Cleansing Bridges ; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



Mayerle's 




Expert Optical Service and 

Scientific Eye Examinations 

960 Market Street 

29 Years in San Franciaco 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a little better than seem* necessary" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold in similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
37-45 First Street - - San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

(• mi ran teed Fnetory He built 



HOLD 

RKNTBD 

KKI*.\IKttI> 



All Makes 

See the New Remington Portable 
The Standard Keyboard Portable 

Paper — Ribbons — Carbon — Supplies 
AMERICAN WRITING MACHINE CO. 

KOfl Market M.s.m Fran, Phone Doue. 649 
808 1 -Hi SI., Oakland Phone Oakland 8764 



— ANNUAL MEETING — 
THK JOSHUA HKMIV [RON WORKS 
The regular annual meeting of the stock- 
holders of Trip Joshua Ilendy Iron Works 
will lie held at the office of the Corpora- 
lion. No. 75 Fremont Street, San Fran- 
cisco. California, on Tuesday, the 13th day 
of February. 19 2.?. at the hour of 10 
:k a. m.. for the purpose of electing 
a Board of Directors to serve for the en- 
suing year, and the transaction of such 
other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

(HAS. C. GARDNER. Secretary. 
Office. 75 Fremont Street. San Francisco, 
Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 3, 1923 




PL/EASURE/S WAND 



'Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




Stars of Yesterday Arouse 
Orpheum Sentiment 

"Little Corinne, the Child Wonder" made 
a great hit thirty years ago at the old Bald- 
win theater, and today she creates rapturous 
applause at the Orpheum. The years have 
treated her kindly, increasing the embon- 
point, to be sure, and delicately tracing a 
few line; on the face. But the spirit that 
filled the child wonder and ran through her 
audience then is still hers; a delightful per- 
sonality. Her companions in the aggrega- 
tion of stars are Barney Fagan, Lizzie Wil- 
son, Joseph Sullivan and Tony Williams, all 
older artists, and the little brave company 
making a strong appeal with their act. 

To Raymond Hitchcock, Broadway favor- 
ite, genial comedian, master of monologue, 
apology is forthcoming. He has place in the 
second paragraph of this humble commen- 
tary, instead of the accustomed top line. But 
no one in the world would be readier than 
"Hitchy" to make "place aux dames." Cor- 
inne precedes him. His solitary state seems 
strange, for we are used to the feminine 
complex, and we miss his fair ladies flock- 
ing round. He misses them, too, but makes 
a bold attempt to play a lone hand — and 
wins. His style is effective, distinctive, his 
own; and the sparkling line of chatter that 
runs like a necklace through his skilful hands 
is the best thing in vaudeville we have had. 

There are other entertaining features on 
the Orpheum's bill — some better than some, 
all good. 



The Players 

The attractive little Bush street theater is 
indulging in a brief and busy season of 
three remarkably interesting one-act plays. 
Ten performances only is the extent of their 
run, and eager patrons are filling the Mighty 
Atom Theater every evening. Booth Tark- 
ington's "Ghost Story" opens the bill, very 
Tarkingtonian in spirit and delightfully in- 
terpreted by a score of the youngest of the 



SAtl FRANCISCO 




i 



MA ™f s 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Snioking Permitted in Dress Circle 
and Logos 



Players, who all are "en rapport" with their 
author and enjoy interpreting his juvenile 
masterpiece. Next, the eternal triangle. Al- 
fred Sutro's "Man in the Stalls" — well con- 
structed and holding the interest through- 
out. Lord Dunsany's brilliant bit of drama, 
"The Queen's Enemies," is just the sort of 
thing the Players do best. The scenic and 
costume effects are highly artistic, the act- 
ing is brilliant; the climax of the tragedy 
is tremendous in its sudden appalling dis- 
closure. No praise is too high for the di- 
rector, Reginald Travers. 



his selection and his musicians' execution 
being of a high standard. 



Columbia 

Welcome to our city is dear, delightful 
May Robson, with her "Mother's Millions" or 
without a cent. To this cheery, wholesome 
old friend is extended always the glad, glad 
hand. She can't come too often, nor stay 
too long. And she never does. The annual 
visit is an event at the Columbia, and the 
long-continued applause from the large and 
friendly audience is one of the pleasant 
parts of it, followed by the flowers, sheaves 
of them going over the footlights into the 
open arms of smiling, happy Miss Robson, 
whom we believe when she tells us she is 
glad to be in San Francisco again. A bonnie 
person, and withal a clever one, for she 
invariably brings a good clean, crisp play 
full of fun and fervor and plenty of capable 
actors and actresses. "Mother's Millions" is 
a hearty meal; it was written for Miss Rob- 
son and the loud pedal is alternated with 
the tremolo throughout the piece — typical 
May Robson material, shouts and sobs, 
harangues and gentle affection, sensation and 
sentiment. I do not grudge the glove 1 burst 
on Monday evening. 



Imperial 

"The Flirt." Hum. A large order, you 
will say as you cast your eye down the long 
list of motion picture attractions this week. 
There are flirts and flirts. Rather alluring, 
on the whole, and with mind prepared to 
condemn and heart open to affection, we 
go to see this particular brand of flirt that 
Booth Tarkington portrays in his inimitable 
fashion, understanding so well the wiles of 
woman and the way to display them. Eileen 
Percy plays Cora, the spoiled, selfish heroine 
of the piece, and George Nichols is her long- 
suffering father. Excellent acting is done by 
both of these artists. Helen Eddy as the 
plain sister is convincing, and the rest of 
the performers acquit themselves admirably. 
"The Birth of Aviation" makes an interest- 
ing short film, showing the wonderful im- 
provements in this field since the first flight 
seventeen years ago. Lewis, as orchestra 
conductor, is an acquisition to the Imperial, 



Granada 

"Gimme" is the work of Rupert Hughes, 
assisted by his wife. If Mrs. Hughes is go- 
ing to do much collaborating with her clever 
husband it is earnestly hoped that they get 
I" Id of some better material than is used in 
the play under discussion. This "Gimme" 
picture is full to repletion of disgusting de- 
tails and very poorly disguised propoganda. 
It is so far from being subtle that one is re- 
minded of the Teutonic treatment of a sub- 
ject — slathering it on with a shovel, if you 
follow me. I grow impatient with the movies 
sometimes. They spend so much time and 
space and titles and subtitles and everything 
upon a matter that is so evident a feeble- 
minded infant could see it at a glance. One 
glance and enough. Spare us reels and reels 
and reels of elaboration. The attitude of a 
beggar is always objectionable, whether it 
is a tiresome dog at the table, or an insis- 
tent child for the matches, or a wife whose 
economic dependence is turned into tragedy 
by a stupid husband's imperviousness to 
hints. I don't want plays written about this 
sort of thing, and I don't want to have to 
see them when they are written. Must we 
go on playing our hands and knees upon 
the nursery floor, when we can stand up, 
erect and high-reaching, and view life from 
man's ideal posture? Let us soar and not 
grovel. Mediocre is the only word of com- 
ment fcr "Gimme." It's an awful word. Paul 
Ash and his fellow-conspirators are in China- 
town this week and appear to entertain their 
audiences mightily with their travesty on the 
Oriental New Year. "Felix Stems the Tide" 
is a clever cartoon comedy. Wallace plays 
beautifully on his large organ, "A Wedding 
Day at Troldhaugen." 



Not just glass 



enters into the making of your eyeglasses 
when > btaln them al any "i our es- 
tablishments — hut the benefit of years of 
experience and study by specially trained 

Optometrists and made l>> ttie finest opti- 
ca] mechanic! obtainable. Our well known 

minium t satisfaction is of importance 

to you. 

W. D. Fennlmore A. R. Fennimore 

J. W. I>avi« 




Nan Franclxco - 
Berkeley - 
Oakland - 



181 Pont, 2508 Mission StH. 

- 2106 Shattuck Avenue 

- - - 1221 Broadway 



February 3. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



California 

" iheWorld's Applause" is .1 sententious title 
and as such is to be deplored. The play, 
however, is better than its name, and capti- 
vating Bebe Daniels has a part in it that fits 
her like milady's glove. As the actress who 
does not realize the difference between a 
famous and an infamous reputation until it 
was forced home upon her, Miss Daniels 
does some of her very best work. Lewis 
Stone is cast for the part opposite her, and 
Kathlyn Williams, Adolph Menjou, Clarence 
Burton and other prominent people play the 
less important roles. Ben Black's band plays 
a number of popular tunes and Falvey at 
the organ makes good music, while a Babby 
Bumps cartoon and the News Weekly are 
seen in fresh series. 



Sol Pincus Is Promoted 

Sol Pincus, for several years assistant man- 
ager and publicity representative for the Im- 
perial theater, has been made manager by 
J. A. Parkington and Eugene H. Roth, di- 
rectors of the Rothchild chain of picture 
houses. Mr. Pincus succeeds Van B. Cle- 
ment, who is going into other lines. 



BRlEFLETS 

Ysleta, Texas, is the oldest town in the 
United States, according to tradition. It is 
believed the town was founded in 1540 by 
Don Francisco Vasquez Coronado, a Span- 
ish explorer. This would make it twenty- 
five years older than St. Augustine, Fla., 
the oldest town of authentic record. 



Every foreign tourist putting up for 24 
hours in Munich, Germany, is taxed 750 
marks. A week's stay costs 1250 marks and 
the tax for a month is 2000 marks. 



Ex-kaiser William's memoirs in book form 
will sell in Germany for 15 cents a copy. 
Among the heading, as shown by the pros- 
pectus, are the following: "My Attitude To- 
ward the Church," "The Outbreak of the 
War," "The End of the War," "The Pope 
and the Peace," "Friendly and Neutral Pow- 
ers," "The Destruction and Germany's Fu- 
ture." 



The new U. S. ZRI airship now being con- 
structed requires a section of the intestine 
from more than 2.000,000 cattle. Only a 
small piece of this tough skin, known as 
"gold beater skin." can be obtained from 
each animal. After the skins are cemented 
together the fabric is varnished. 



Unsightly black patches, which mar the 
appearance of concrete roads after repair 
work has been done, will be avoided by the 
use of a material for the purpose developed 
by the Department of Agriculture. It has the 
same color as concrete and consists of twelve 
parts rosin and one part crude rubber, with 
sufficient barium sulphate to give the desired 
color. 



Colorado has a mountain area sis times 
as great as Switzerland with forty-lwo peaks 
exceeding 14,000 feet altitude as against 
eight such giants in the Swiss Alps. It has 
thirty-six mountains higher than Mount 
Fuesteraahorn, the highest peak in Switzer- 
land. 



Pope Pius is to have the first pontifical 
automobile. The people of Milan have pre- 
sented him with a machine of the latest Ital- 
ian model. It is mauve colored and bears 
the papal coat of arms, surmounted by the 
triple crown and the pontifical keys. Vatican 
officials have remarked the change from rela- 
tively recent times when ecclesiastics were 
forbidden to ride bicycles. 



It will soon be possible for night passen- 
gers to view the country through which their 
train is passing. Powerful flood lights on the 
roof at the rear of the observation car will 
uniformly cover a radius of at least 160 
degrees, with height and depth sufficient to 
catch canyons and rivers, mountains and 
lakes as the train leaves them behind in its 
onward rush through the darkness. It is 
possible the lighting system may be extended 
along the roofs of all coaches lengthwise 
so that passengers throughout the train will 
have the benefit of the view on one side or 
the other. Dynamos driven by the axles of 
modern Pullmans generate more electricity 
than is required for present purposes; hence 
there would be no added expense for current. 



Shells from heavy guns at Fort Sheridan 
ripped and tore through the exclusive sec- 
tion of Lake Forest, north shore suburb of 
Chicago, recently. Four shells struck the 
residence of Francis V. Farwell and others 
landed on the Cyrus H. McCormick estate. 
Terror-stricken servants ran screaming from 
the Farwell house when the bombardment 



bi hi I he > ommandci ol Fort Sheridan 
rushed to the suburb lo make an apology 
on behalf of the United States army. In- 
vestigation proved that some of the new re- 
cruits trained their one-pounders in the wrong 
direction and instead of shooting out over 
Lake Michigan the "rookies" bombarded the 
suburb. 



The harp is believed to have originated 
from the hunting bow, the tightly stretched 
string of which will emit a musical note. 



At one time in England the body of a 
suicide was denied Christian ries in burial. 



Fine Exhibit 
of Art 

Lovers and patrons of art will be 
interested in viewing our collection of 
oil paintings now on exhibit in our 
galleries. 

The old and modern schools of art 
are both well represented and the va- 
riety of subjects treated is very large 
indeed. 

SAN FRANCISCO ART GALLERIES 

OF THE A. I. A. E. (INC.) 

517 Sutter Street 



ECZEMA 

IS ONLY SKIN DEEP 



and can be Instantly relieved and quickly 
healed by the use of CRANOLENE, the suc- 
cessful cranberry cream treatment for stub- 
born skin troubles. At drug stores, 3£>c and 
$1.00, or write for Free T«st Treatment to 
Cranolene Company, Dept. 7 Girard, Kan»*» 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY 

63 Acres For Sale 



Ideally situated. Gently rolling. Beautiful Las Uvas creek, 
never ending water supply, runs for one-half mile through center 
of property. Bungalow, tank house, small orchard, thousands 
of cords of wood along creek. Forty acres can be cultivated. 
Nine miles from Morgan Hill on Las Uvas road, or twenty- 
one miles from San Jose via Almaden road. 



Price $9000 



Apply Owner, Room 382 
235 Montgomery St., San Francisco 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 3, 1923 



Fred Kahn 



Automotive Engineering in Its 
Entirety 

UNDER ONE ROOF 



General Repairing and Overhauling 


Fender and 
Radiator Work 
Body Building 
Woodwork 
Machine Work 


Ignition 

Welding 

Krazing 

Blacksmithing 

Electrical 


» 'arbni 


etion 



Experts in Every Branch 
1507 SUTTER Telephone West 8296 

Authorized Elgin Parts and Service 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3419 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Hoars: 2 till 4, and by Appointment 

Phone Sutter 1718 

REMOVED TO 

Howard Building, 209 Post Street 

Corner Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



S The Automobile 1 

is I 

a»»a»a»S»*S MS5J H S3 .j'Sj a "a :: Sx'A :-. X 

The Wm. L. Hughson Company, agents 
for the Ford-Lincoln automobiles, announced 
a program beginning last Tuesday, and end- 
ing this Saturday, the 3rd of February. It 
comprises cash prizes for the best women 
Ford drivers, cash prizes for the oldest Fords 
entered, lectures and motion pictures; also 
a dance on the last evening. A good idea for 
other automobile companies to follow, aside 
from the big show that is to open on the 1 7th. 



Old Tires for "Spares" 

It is a mistake to carry new tires as spares. 
The epidemic of tire stealing that prevails 
throughout the country has demonstrated the 
avidity of thieves for tires that have never 
been used and can be disposed of as new. 
A new tire naturally brings a much higher 
price than one that shows wear. Motorists 
whose new spares have been stolen with un- 
failing regularity should remember that they 
have been offering tempting bait to the 
thieves. The sensible thing to do is to use a 
new tire for a few hundred miles before 
using it as a spare. 



Where Squeaks Are Found 

Sources of squeaks in the body of a car 
may be in the floor boards, which may be 
loose and rubbing together; in loose doors, 
windshield or brackets, the dash, particularly 
where it is secured to the body, where the 
body rests on the car frame or in the top 
bows and braces. All body squeaks are hard 
to locate, and especially so in an old car, 
when the body has sagged and settled. 



Gear Shifting Saves Gasoline 

"In ascending a hill, don't wait until the 
last second to shift to a lower gear. If you do 
you will not only lose speed and overtax 
your engine, but you will also consume more 
gasoline." This is the warning to motorists 
issued by the Bureau of Public Roads, Wash- 
ington, D. C, and based on tests conducted 
by Prof. T. R. Agg of Iowa State College 
working with the bureau under the auspices 
of the National Research Council. 



Closed Cars Are in Demand 

Statistics just compiled by the sales de- 
partment of the Franklin Automobile Com- 
pany show that during the year just ended 
68 per cent of Franklin shipments were 
closed cars, an increase of 16 per cent over 
the preceding year. In 1919 Franklin closed 
car shipments represented 28 per cent of 
the whole. In 1920 the percentage was 45 
per cent and in 1921 it was 52 per cent. 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 381 San Francisco 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



Joe ^ 

MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
thenewHEXEON 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



1140 Geary Street 



Tel. Franklin 3l!Hf> 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining to Automobiles 
Oxy-Acetylene Welding — Black^mlthlng 



H. W. Culver 



M, Daberer 



E. Johnson 



LEE S. DOLSON 



CHAS. J. EVANS 



Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 85c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

05 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
$1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 

French and Italian Dinners 
FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Suit* Pressed by llund, Only — 
Suit* Culled for and Pellvered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

l'u r U in n Dyeing find CU'iinlng 
433 Miis, hi St. Phone Franklin 2510 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



The Largest of America's Industries 

The automotive industry today, it is 
claimed, is the largest among America's man- 
ufactories. It is bigger than oil. meat, lumber 
and iron and steel. Only agriculture exceeds 
it. One out of seven wage earners get their 
livelihood from it. The 1922 business will 
reach the astonishing total of two and three- 
quarters billion dollars. Of this total, ac- 
cording to statisticians of the Miller Rubber 
Company, tires represent approximately 
$700,000,000. 

In passenger miles for the year, the auto- 
mobile should have two against the railroad's 
one. Its seating capacity is twenty to one of 
the railroad coach. 

One in every three bales of cotton go into 
automobile tires. Four out of every five 
pounds of rubber are used for them. Eighty 
per cent of the five and one-half billion 
gallons of gas produced for the year will be 
required to run the 1 1 ,000,000 cars regis- 
tered today. 



The Car of Five Years Hence 

"The car of the future," said C. F. Ket- 
tering in an address before members of the 
Society of Automotive Engineers, "will bear 
tools plainly marked for their intended use. 
It will have an improved top that may or 
may not be lowered. It can be given a fin- 
ish as good as new in an hour. It will have 
springs that will make it ride as well as the 
two-ton car of today and it will handle even 
poorer fuel than is being sold now. This 
is all coming in the next five years." 



Skidless Highways 

One million motorists throughout the na- 
tion will ask the highway engineers to find 
a way to make a smooth road fool-proof in 
wet weather. They believe it can be done, 
although the engineers as yet have not found 
a way. Through their national organization, 
the National Motorists Association, the 
1 ,000,000 motorists will help solve the prob- 
lem, if possible. But they want it solved, 
for the greatest single menace to the auto- 
driver today, as they see it, is a smooth road 
in wet weather. 



Testing Clutch Slipping 

When a motorist desires to be certain if 
his clutch is slipping he can make a simple 
test. First run the engine at about twenty 
miles an hour, but not faster than twenty- 
two, then set the emergency brake tight. 
Shift the gear to high, and gradually engage 
the clutch. If the motor stalls the clutch is 
not slipping, but if it continues to run, the 
clutch must be given immediate attention. 



Cannon balls, abonded by General John 
C. Fremont in his expedition to California 
in 1844. were uncovered recently by a pros- 
pector searching for gold in a small ravine 
not far from Fales Hot Springs in Mono 
County, Calif. Fremont's diary records that 
on January 28, 1844, he was obliged to 
leave his howitzer at a point in Deep Creek. 
This is eight miles north of where the can- 
non balls were discovered. It is supposed 
General Fremont abandoned his howitzer 
ammunition as of no further use. 



II0TELPLA7A 

Jan FRANCISCO 



DINING-ROOM 

Surprisingly good meals 

pleasingly served. Note 

t h e moderate prices : 

breakfast 25c to 75c 
Luncheon 65c 
Dinner $1.85 

(A la Carte Service also) 







FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1«2«-l«>2:? Market Street 

Between Franklin nnd (iough 

Telephone Park 271 



Cafe Marquard 

GRARY AND MASON' STREETS 

Telephone Prospect 61 

Yleltorg In Sun KrnnoiHco Delight in I he 
Gay Bohemian Atmosphere. I lie Enler- 
1 it i nine nl nnd Dancing, the Knre Qui* lily 

of Pood and Courteoui service 



mm HEON 
Continental Style 
Twenty-six Delicious Dishes. Prepared 
So Differently 



I>INNER 



Every Evening — Six to Nine 
Also Select a la Carte 



Dancing and Cabaret 



Sunbeams 



»Wii» •■' " >< " * » x x " » 



The very nervous bridegroom was called 
to make a speech at the wedding breakfast 
so, putting his hand on his bride's shoulder, 
he hesitatingly remarked: "Ladies and gen- 
tlemen, this thing has been thrust upon me." 



A woman went into a cigar store to buy 
some cigars for her husband, who was laid 

up ;. 

"Do you want them mild or strong, ma- 
dam?" the clerk asked. 

"Give me the strongest you have," she 
said. "The last ones he had broke in his 
pocket." — Everybody's. 



Aunt Janet — Gladys, you have several runs 
and two holes in your stockings. 

Gladys — Yes, I know, they are on their 
last legs. — Life. 



Mrs. Jones was entertaining some of her 
son's little friends. 

"Willie," she said, addressing a six-year- 
old who was enjoying a plate of cold beef, 
"are you sure that you can cut your own 
meat?" 

The child, who was making desperate 
efforts with his knife and fork, replied, "Yes, 
thanks. I've often had it as tough as this 
at home." 



"What do you make a week?" asked the 
judge of an Italian organ-grinder who 
charged a man with breaking his instrument 
the other day. 

"Twenty dollars, sare." 

"Eh! What Twenty dollars for grinding 
an organ?" 

"No, sare, not for grind — for shut up and 
go away." 

John, the butler, looked very worried when 
his mistress exclaimed, "What's the matter, 
John?" 

John- Well, it's like this. I've had a let- 
ter from Mr. Greening saying he wants his 
drawing materials sent on to him in Nor- 
folk. 

Mistress— Well, that is plain enough. 

John — Well. I don't know whether to send 
his paint and brushes or a corkscrew. 



A profiteer bought a wonderful country 
heme and set about making it even more 
wcnderful. One of his suggestions was a 
fish pond which should contain eels. 

"But you can't keep eels in a pond," ob- 
jected his neighbor, to whom he had con- 
fided his idea. "They have to go down to 
the sea every year, you know." 

"Well, I won't have 'em." gasped the 
profiteer; "I always takes the missus and 
kids every year, but I ain't going to take 
no eels." 



Wedrlins Present The choicest variety 

to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



Another Guaranteed Gardner 




We extend to the 1923 Gardner a one-year 
WRITTEN GUARANTEE 

— Because it is a Four, with the assured economy found 
in Fours alone. 

— Because the FIVE-BEARING CRANKSHAFT, a fea- 
ture found in no other four-cylinder motor, makes 
possible exceptional power and flexibility without 
the vibration that shortens the life of engines less 
well built. 

— Because it is a car of BALANCED VALUE, with a 
sturdy chassis; well-built, comfortable body; last- 
ing finish — a car made for long and trouble-free 
service. 

— Because it is the product of an organization that has 
served the public with dependable transportation for 
more than 40 years. 

Let us demonstrate the 1923 Gardner. The story is best 
told on the road 

J. W. FRAWLEY, Inc. 

1135 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Prospect 9160 




Announcing the Completion 

of the Red Square 

Vacuum Cup Cord Line! 

We are positive no tire ever introduced was accepted 
with the whole-hearted enthusiasm that marked the an- 
nouncement of Pennsylvania Red Square Vacuum Cup 
Cord Tires in Ford sizes. 

The reasons are obvious: 

Cord tires which strictly maintain the Penn- 
sylvania standard of highest quality; 

Cord tires readily interchangeable with the 
thousands of fabric tires now in use; 

Cord tires selling at prices so moderate as to 
make the change from fabric to cord equip- 
ment a matter of actual economy. 

TANSEY- CROWE COMPANY 

1233 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Prospect 2000 



They Pay for 

Themselves ! 

The running hours of your automobile 
aren't the expensive hours. 

It's the hours your car spends in the 
shop that cost — cost — cost. 

Gruss Air Springs will keep you car out 
of the shop. They will cut your opera- 
ting expense to the very bone. 

Gruss Air Springs pay for themselves. 

On the basis of downright, provable 
economy you should equip with Gruss 
Air Springs. 



GRUSS AIR SPRING COMPANY 

865 Post St. 
San Francisco, Calif. 







: « 



m. 



«s 



GrassAlrSprings 



— ask any expert 



and Finally 

• 

Dash, comma, dash, 
comma and finally a 
period. Just a graphic 
illustration of a 
motor taking the big 
hill with cheap oil. 
It's all dash with 
Monogram. 

UAUAitnill 

■SfOjLS AND GREASES Bfl 

Wunuuknm 

j& yourlHoter's £fe insurance 



Established July 20, 1856 




price 10 cents $5.00 per year 

California Advertiser 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1923 



LOS ANGELES 






Convert your present ice box into a cold storage plant with 

"Frigidaire" 

It is operated by electricity. 

It is entirely automatic. 

It requires absolutely no attention. 

Cost of operation is nominal. 

Frigidaire may be seen in operation at any of the places listed below, or a 
copy of Frigidaire booklet will be sent on request. 

de JONGH & COCHRAN 

880 Mission St.. S;m Francisco, Cal. ISO E, 6th St.. t.n-. Angeles, Cal. 

FRED E. PORTER 

:i:5!> 18th Ave. Oakland, Cal., Phone Oakland :i!>oo 

T. E. BAKER & SONS 

2."><» South Firs! Street, San Jose, Cal. 





THE ELECTRIC 



REFRIGERATOR for MODERN HOMES 






Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR 

105 MONTGOMERY STREET 





Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Manager 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 30th, 1922 

Assets $80,671,392.53 

Deposits 76,921,392.53 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,750,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 400,613.61 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. ond 7ih Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haightand Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter 

(4M) P er cent per annum was declared for the six 

months ending December 31st, 1922. 




N. W. CORNER 



BOND DEPARTMENT 
Anglo-London-Paris Company 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 5600 
San Francisco, Calif. 



RECOMMENDS 



Irrigation District Bonds 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 

first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6 3/4% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOND 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 11 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



TYPEWRITERS 

( . mi m in r.il Factory Rebuilt 

All Makes gj™,, 

See the New Remington Portable 
The Standard Keyboard Portable 

Paper — Ribbons — Carbon — Supplies 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce American writing machine co 



HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid TJp Capital $15,000,000 $15,000,000 Beaerve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 



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BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.).... 75c 

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ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1866 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of Calitornia and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. CII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1923 



No. 6 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building. Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco. Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco. 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $6.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 



NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



—Liquor is still sold on the high seas; Father Neptune will 

always belong to the "wets." 

* * * 

"The events of today show results for France which are 

ominous of the final outcome of this whole Ruhr adventure; mili- 
tary glory and economic failure," says the London Times. 

* * * 

Perverse Percy, however he may have offended the rest of 

the clergy, is certainly as clever a self-advertiser as the "Divine 

Sarah." 

* * * 

An appropriation of $10,000 has been proposed in Los An- 
geles to be paid in wages to the hundreds of unemployed in that 
city for public work. And still Los Angeles reiterates its prosperity. 

* * * 

Earthquakes and tidal waves in Hawaii; village near Milan, 

swallowed up; forester's wife reports smoke coming from the sum- 
mit of Mt. Hood; Mt. Lassen at it again— Mother Earth is going 
on the rampage, just as her children have done, the last nine years! 

* * * 

—Bank clearings show San Francisco to be the fifth city among 
the commercial cities of the United States; Los Angeles as the 

ninth, and "figures don't lie," you knowl 

* * * 

— Buttercups, like glints of yellow sunshine, are appearing on 
the flower stands, in contrast to the deep lavender of the wild iris; 
the shop windows are flaunting gay colors in sport togs, and here 

it is spring again, people! 

* * * 

If J. L. Asher, that revenue agent who has made a record for 

himself discovering sixty bootlegging dens in the city of Washing- 
ton, D. C, is a native of Kentucky, from whose mountains he hails. 
it would seem that perhaps "it takes a moonshiner to catch a moon- 
shiner." 

* * * 

Great Britain is exporting her surplus women to Australia and 

other British dominions, where there is a predominence of males. 
This is not compulsory, we are told, but the movement is being 
carried on with the tacit approval of the authorities. Not so very 
long ago the whole world was holding up its hands in horror at the 
barbarism of the German government, which was arbitrarily ar- 
ranging marriages between its male and female citizens, for the 
purpose of propagation. i 



— Life is a strange thing; we don't even get out of it alive. 

— Two "prosperous business men" were talking on the California 
street car around 9:30 the other morning: "I can remember," said 
one, "when offices in San Francisco opened at 7 a. m. and if a 
fellow didn't show up until 7:30 or so, he was asked by his boss 
'where he has spent the fore-noon?' Now, 9 and 9:30 are the 
usual hours, even for the shops, and just as much work, if not 
more, is accomplished than in the old days. Gradually, we are get- 
ting out of the way of driving our help, and a darned good thing, 
too!" 

— The Senate measure proposing to make it compulsory for elec- 
tors to register within the time and manner required by law, and 
to compel those registered to attend the polls at all elections, are 
no doubt arbitrary laws, but the indifference of a large contingent 
of California citizens is making the non-voting evil a dangerous 
one. The very men and women who are capable of casting an in- 
telligent vote are the ones who sit back and say "I don't intend to 
soil my hands with dirty politics," not realizing that by their con- 
tempt for politics they are leaving their government almost com- 
pletely in the hands of the "dirty" politicians. 

— We can learn to advantage some of the methods which our 
southern city employs toward things educational. The recent ex- 
hibit of contemporary French art at the auditorium contained, like 
most exhibits, good, bad and indifferent paintings, but taken as 
a whole it could certainly be classed as educational. M. d'Oelsnitz, 
the exhibitor, was charged $130 per day rental by San Francisco, 
for Polk Hall, aside from his expenses in the way of printing, etc., 
and received (more shame to the press) nothing to speak of as re- 
gards publicity — except from the Journal and the News Letter. 
Members from the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce visited 
d'Oelsnitz personally, offered him a hall, rent free, to pay for his 
printing, and to give him all the publicity he desired! 

— Eustace Cullinan is having the time of his life at Sacra- 
mento on the accounting for the expenditures amounting to about 
a quarter of a million in defeating the water and power act. It is 
hard to see why the heckling should be taking place, but it is still 
harder to understand why a man of the ability of Cullinan should 
have got into the jam through not filing a statement. This only 
means that very clever men sometimes do very foolish things. And 
yet, and yet! The list of expenditures shows that the method of 
working was not very bright and lots of money went into useless 
methods. Such driblets to such unimportant people augurs a cur- 
iously unskilled attitude on the part of those to whom we should 
have given credit for greater acuteness. It is commonly reputed 
that great corporations are exclusive monopolists of talent but it 
it a curious fact that an organization tends to obtuseness propor- 
tionately as it attains prodigousness, like an antediluvian animal. 
Mr. Cullinan please note. 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




Adultery, wilful neglect, habitual intemperance, conviction 
Divorce of felony, cruelty and wilful desertion have heretofore 
been the grounds upon which a man or woman could ob- 
tain a decree of divorce in the state of California. A bill has been 
introduced in the assembly by Mr. Lyons, adding insanity as a cause 
for divorce. 

The deplorable thing is that insanity had not been considered 
cause for divorce when divorce was first instituted, for surely a 
man or woman tied for life to an insane spouse is a condition of 
martyrdom that should never have been fastened upon a human 
being! As time goes on, divorce will be made easier and easier for 
the discontented or disgusted man or woman to obtain, and this 
is only as it should be. The tighter the marriage bond, the surer 
the trend of the human being towards freedom, illicit relationship, 
and probably as a consequence, an increase in illegitimate children. 
The lighter the bonds of matrimony the more inclined a man or 
woman are, towards staying together. We are all children, more 
or less, and extremely contrary children at that, and the spirit 
rebells against restraint or bondage. This is why the radical re- 
form bills will never be a success; why prohibition, one of the most 
radical and assinine of reform bills, will never be a success! 

The more enlightened a state, the more elastic its divorce laws 
become. There may come a beatific time when men and women 
will only marry for love and live together for love, and every child 
will then indeed know the right to be "well born." That a man or 
woman should have to go through any more rigmarole in obtaining 
a decree of divorce than in obtaining a certificate of marriage, only 
shows the ignorance of the time in which we live. Supposing, to 
become possessed of a marriage license, we should have to "prove" 
that we are "in love"? Why then, should we have to prove that we 
are "out of love" to obtain a legal separation? 

"Ah!" but the wisecares protest, "We must think of the child- 
ren!" Well, what of the children under the present condition of 
divorce? Did you ever hear of a man supporting his children, after 
a legal separation, if he didn't want to support them? If he is a 
shiftless, heartless, indifferent individual, a man-made law isn't going 
to make him any the less so. If a woman (in only one case out of 
a thousand, thank heaven, do we find this!) has no love for her 
child, no law is going to put love into her heart! There is nothing 
more degrading, more stultifying, more heart-breaking, than a case 
where the children must listen to eternal wrangling of parents or 
realize their infidelities. "For the children's sake," is a cloak that 
has often covered arrant cowardice, deceit, adultery. 



The pity is, that divorce laws are not national, 
National Laws Needed instead of state laws. A person may be di- 
vorced for seven causes in California, other 
states have three or four causes, while we believe there is but one 
cause for divorce in the state of New York. Therefore, we may 
be lawfully divorced in one state, and should we re-marry, and go 
to another state (perhaps just over the border) we find ourselves 
living in a condition of bigamy! How often abiding by certain 
laws makes criminals of people who are anything but criminally 
inclined. 

The world in general appears to be wakening up to the "good 
of divorce," instead of the "evil of divorce," as it has been called 
by narrow-minded antedeluvians. Even in England, that country 
of stringent marriage ties, the former Lord Chancellor Buckmaster 
comes forth in an answer to Dean Inge's published opinion on di- 
vorce, and says, "The dean declares that the permission to re-marry 



breaks up homes. On the contrary, it establishes them. The thing 
that people seem so unable to understand is the absorbing fidelity 
of the woman to the man she has married. A woman does not con- 
ceive passion, lawful or unlawful, for other men, except in rare 
cases, unless the man to whom she is bound has insulted and of- 
fended her in ways that cannot be described, and broken down the 
self-respect and dignity with which every woman should be hedged 
about. 

"The modern conception of marriage, as I see it, is this: That 
a man and woman stand equal together, with equal rights, equal 
knowledge, and equal duties, with a sense of free, unfettered com- 
panionship and obligations, discharged because of mutual affection 
and not because of ugly words in an obsolete setting." 

What this country and all other countries need are more Lord 
Buckmasters to make federal (why not universal?) divorce laws! 



The individual citizen measures the city's needs 
A Vital Question largely as they effect himself and his business, and 

his approval of civic measures generally goes to 
those that add to his personal comfort and convenience. This at- 
titude of the voter is reflected in the overwhelming majorities which 
were recorded in the last two general elections in favor of better 
street car service and further street car development within our city. 
Why these measures were favored is because better street car trans- 
portation benefits to such a degree each individual citizen. Adequate 
street car transportation facilities are vital to the welfare of our 
citizens, and without it increased industry, population and business 
are impossible within our city. 

San Francisco has at present two good street car transportation 
systems, but unfortunately there is no co-ordination between them, 
with the result there is duplication of service in some parts of the 
city and no service at all in other parts of the city. The transfers 
of one system are worthless on the other system, which necessitates 
in many instances the payment of two fares, entailing inconvenience 
and unnecessary expense. Passengers are forced to change cars 
many times in reaching their destination. There are few direct routes 
and no through cars. There can be no question as to the desir- 
ability of the unification of these two individual systems, which uni- 
fication can be only consummated by the city taking over the prop- 
erties of the Market Street Railway Company, to be paid for out 
of their earnings. The payment of the purchase price of these prop- 
erties to be stretched over a long term of years and to be paid only 
out of the earnings of the properties themselves. 

This matter of better street car transportation is of utmost im- 
portance if our city is to grow. The determination of this matter 
has been placed in the hands of the city administrator for solution. 
It has been asked for by nearly every civic, district and improve- 
ment organization in the city. It has been twice demanded by the 
electorate by overwhelming majorities at the polls. Our great street 
car-riding public is entitled to consideration at the hands of the 
city, consideration that cannot be accorded them unless the entire 
transportation system is unified under the management of the city, 
as the initial step in the needed street car improvements and bet- 
terments. 



Strangers of the past coming to San Fran- 
The Beggars in Town cisco for a shorter or a longer stay, have al- 
ways told the people 'way back home that San 
Francisco was a city in which there were few street beggars. In 
fact there were days in the past when the beggar was not. Lately, 



February 10, 1923 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



however, the beggar swarms. At night you may not walk four blocks 
of the city's streets without some great big husky coming alongside 
and telling you a whining tale of being without "eats" or of wanting 
some place to lay his weary head. In these days of Community 
Chest and a good police force there is no valid reason why such 
things should be. Either these men are entitled to help or they are 
not. In either event they should be taken care of by the city and 
they should not be allowed to wander the streets importuning every 
passer-by. The police should see to it these people are taken care 
of, given food and bed, if they deserve it, or they should be run 
into jail first and out of town afterward. In these days of plenty, 
when employers claim they are everywhere looking for help, none 
should be without work. San Francisco is no place for the pro- 
fessional indigents. Everyone should work or get out. 



The San Francisco police department is one of 
The Police Force the efficient city forces and that force should look 

to it that it does not rot from the core out. There 
are entirely too many on the force winking at the commission of 
crimes. Breaking the laws, and it makes no difference whatever 
whether you approve of the law or not, is crime. Any policeman 
who lends a benevolent or profiteering help to bootleggers should 
be punished as severely as the law permits. Many of us do not 
believe in prohibition at all but the good citizen does not help 
people along the lines of criminality and no help should be ex- 
tended the law-breaker. If the law is obnoxious, repeal it. The 
people of California had the chance to express themselves as to 
prohibition and its wonderful results and they took the chance to 
say practically they liked it. That means the law should be rigidly 
enforced. 



Speaking of laws draws attention to the flood of 
Speaking of Laws legislative acts posing for adoption by the legisla- 
tors at Sacramento. As a matter of fact, we have 
too many laws now. And the laws we have are most of them dead. 
Why clutter the books with more of the live and dead statutes? 
Some lawyer in New York recently said that he "doubted whether 
the best intentioned man or woman in the state could live an ordi- 
narily normal day without breaking two or three laws" — there were 
so many one had to dodge during a whole lifetime in the Empire 
State. It may not be as bad as that here but it is bad enough. 



At Sacramento there is very evidently no 
The Making of New Law» intention on the part of those gathered 

there to overlook the opportunity so glor- 
iously given them to enact more new laws for infliction on the 
public. So many laws now clutter the statutes that there is not 
one lawyer in a hundred knows anything at all about them. There 
are so many laws that any lawyer would be a fool who tried to 
know anything about them until the necessity arose to make use 
of some particular restriction legally placed on humanity's urge 
to err. 



And it is not a bill for dentistry which is meant 
That Dental Bill but a bill regulating the practice and licensing 

those engaged in the gentle art of tooth carpen- 
tering. While this bill, introduced by Senator Gray, purports to be 
a standardizing regulatory measure aiming to give dignity to the 
practitioner in dentistry and protecting the public as to dental fakirs 
it is in reality a bill which if enacted into law will make of dentistry 
a closed corporation. It is aimed to close, if it is possible, many 
flourishing establishments now doing dentistry on a large scale, doing 
it as well as the paid dentists know how, and doing it as cheaply 
as good work of the kind may be delivered for to the public. This 
bill would be what is termed among horsemen as a "lead pipe cinch" 



for the privileged, who are already amply protected by existing laws. 
The next thing you know, in this day of protected art and industry, 
your butcher, your grocer, and all others having pull enough to cause 
laws to be passed, will be creating special legislation to keep others 
from entering into competition with them in their several trades. 
There is no doubt that it IS necessary dentists should have as fine 
qualifications to practice as it is possible to obtain but this law is 
not aimed, it appears, at securing anything of that kind. It is aimed 
at preventing the class of dentists mentioned above from practicing 
and this would, in effect, make it possible for dentists to raise their 
prices excessively to the money loss of the public and to the en- 
dangering of public health by depriving the public of the help gained 
through more moderate prices for work on the teeth. The state of 
California cannot afford to create a closed corporation for the den- 
tists. 



It is with great pleasure it is noted the French 
France and Germany are gradually getting the situation in Germany 

well in hand and that the Germans, within 
the occupied district, are coming back to work and accepting the 
situation with good grace. France has been patient and lenient with 
the German government, but the time is fast approaching where 
more energetic steps will be taken if Germany persists in her un- 
successful attempt at "passive resistence." The French will go to 
Berlin. 



Inevitably, apparently, the war between Great 
Turkey and Brita/n Britain and Turkey will have to be fought out 

to a finish and anyone may predict the end in 
a victory for Great Britain, although the war may last much longer 
than most people think likely. 



THE FOG SIREN ON ALCATRAZ 

The fog siren on Alcatraz is again playing havoc with the nerves 
of the people on Russian Hill and its vicinity. Again it has taken 
on the tone of a lost soul's wailing. The residents of that quarter 
should write their representatives or some one in authority and ask 
why on earth this siren could not have retained its ordinary voice? 
Just as one becomes accustomed to its note, it is changed again 
into something hideous. And that reminds us of the story of a 
Chinaman who owned some property which the government wanted 
to use as the base for a light house and fog signal, somewhere up 
San Pablo way. The owner was very much averse to leasing or 
selling his land, and would not be persuaded to part with it (so the 
story goes). He seemed to object highly to the institution of this 
fog signal. When asked his reason, he said, "Whatee use? All 
lound San Flancisco Bay big horns too, toot at fog, allee time, day 
and night; make big noise; but flog, he come in alee same!" 



-San Francisco is having an epidemic of Russian pianists. 



The Sweetness NeverE uals The Bitterness 
of Low Prices of Poor Quality 



We combine Quality, Price and Service 

JOHNSON BROS., Grocers 

Fillmore Si. at Sacramento — At Your Command Phone W»«t 249 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER February 10, 1923 



^r The Ranch of the Witch's Head I ▼ 



jHSBHHHBilSHIlESHSPBBSHBBHBillSaHSlI 



By ELEANORE F. ROSS 



CHAPTER II. 
The Restless Foot 

ALL the weary miles from Oakland to Sacramento, the wheels 
of the train kept time to that phrase: "She has the restless 
foot, the restless foot, the restless foot." 

The barren, flat, uninteresting scenery swept past us, with nothing 
that I could see to attract the eye. Farther and farther were we 
going from my oak-crowned hills, my sweet smelling meadows, my 
blue, blue bay! Farther and farther into the unknown country, 
and as we went, gradually my mind began to question the wisdom 
of such a proceeding. 

If Mama could not make a success of nine acres of fertile ground, 
with water already piped, close to the city, with home unencumbered 
by debt (as it was before our fatal move to the big town) how 
could she do anything with 1 40 acres, in a strange country with no 
water except for drinking purposes, many miles from any city, and 
with absolutely no experience in ranching? 

All these reasons and others for staying in the old home came 
thronging into my head, young as I was, and added to my utter 
homesickness. Where, oh where, was the "restless foot" taking us? 
I looked around the car at my immediate family. Mama and 
Fannie were both absorbed in novels, the latter as usual, accom- 
panying her reading with a box of chocolates; Virgie in a day dream; 
Charlie restlessly peering from one window after another, alert 
and anxiously interested in everything; Maggie staring doggedly 
at the monotonous landscape; Percie asleep. 

I nudged Virgie impatiently. "Wake up, Juliet!" I exclaimed 
rudely, "and come down out of your balcony! Isn't this scenery 
a disgrace to our golden state? If the ranch looks anything like 
this, I hope we don't get there!" 

"We aren't anywhere near the mountains yet," said Mama, roused 
by the word "ranch"; "just be patient and wait till you see it!" 

At Sacramento we had a strenuous wait of twenty minutes, into 
which we crowded the eating of lunch, the meeting of our dog 
and his master, and the bundling of the dog himself (a fine New- 
foundland, who put new heart into me) to the baggage car, after 
he was properly tagged. 

And then, after a time, came my first sight of the Sierras 

They seemed to evolve out of the purple mists of distance into 
our vision like enormous, stately ghosts; their snow-capped summits 
clear cut as cameos against the blue sky, and brought the sort of 
thrill that one experiences when stepping into a vast and majestic 
cathedral. I felt as if their appearance should be proclaimed by 
strains of martial music; and as if, being a man, one should remove 
one's hat; and being a woman, my head should bow. If Maggie 
had crossed herself and muttered a "praise Mary" it would have 
seemed quite fitting. 

Mama listened to our rapturous exclamations with great satis- 
faction. "What did I tell you?" she said triumphantly. 

We were (with the exception of our faithful retainer) a tired but 
enthusiastic crowd that night, when the little town of Rockdale 
was reached, and we all trouped into the station where we were 
to await the advent of our "hired man." 

"Luke," a tow-headed, thick-set, awkward country boy, came in 
presently, and walking up to the red and embarrassed Maggie, 



extended his hand with: "This is Mrs. Lewis, I presume?" 

Maggie snorted. "It is not," she said, gruffly, "Mrs. Lewis is a 
lady, I'll have ye know!" 

Percie, who had been dancing around like a small brown bear, 
giggled merrily, but the rest of us managed to keep straight faces, 
and poor Luke, after hastily correcting his error, went out again to 
see about board and rooms for us all. 

Absorbed in our own affairs, we had not noticed the excitement 
which our appearance had created in the depot, until Mama, with 
wild eyes, gripped Maggie's arm, and motioned towards the win- 
dows of the station. "In Heaven's name, Maggie, she cried, "What 
are those people staring at us for?" We all turned towards the 
windows. There, pressed against the panes were several faces, all 
looking intently into the room, all looking intently at us! 

Maggie groaned in apparent anguish of soul. "Faith, ma'am," she 
muttered, "what can you except in a God-forsaken hole like this? 
I am getting that bee-wildered meself!" 

CHAPTER III. 
The Boys Disappear 

Afterwards we learned that the townspeople thought we were a 
theatrical troupe, because, as they expressed it, we were "so good- 
looking and so stylish." 



The Mother Goose 
Confections 

Here is Something c PJew! 



A confection made of California's most 
perfect fruits and berries, scientifically pro- 
cessed, chocolate-coated or "candied" in 
their own juices. 

The natural sugar of the fruits produces a 
PERFECT Candy. 

Dipped in chocolate perpetuates the nat- 
ural exquisite flavor and fragrance. 

ioo Varieties, $c to $1.50 Each 

One pound box by mail postpaid, $1.00. 

Send a box to your eastern friends. 

Visit our Art Gallery of Mother Goose 
paintings by Chas. A. Holland, the world's 
famed artist. 

^Mother (joose Confection Co., Inc. 

1214 Market St., San Francisco 



February 10, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



This was cause for much mirth and some satisfaction among us 
three girls, and in the two weeks that we were forced to remain 
in Rockdale, we strove to live up to this flattering opinion of us. 

I say "forced" with reason. For fourteen weary days the heavens 
apparently opened and deluged the whole country; what had been 
a mere placid stream which intervened between us and our desti- 
nation — the ranch — was now a raging torrent, and could not be 
negotiated by wagon and horses. So all our household goods had 
to be stored for the time being, and we had to content ourselves 
with the lodgings and board which the town afforded. 

We felt that we could endure any sort of rooms as long as they 
were clean (which they were), but the board provided us at a near- 
by hotel was almost too much for even our strong stomachs. Meat 
that we could not cut with an ordinary dinner knife; soggy po- 
tatoes and bread; nothing but green tea to drink, and slabs of 
cold, unhealthy looking pie. We were all used to dainty fare at 
that time, and this food was doubly hard to endure. 

"Look at my neck, mama," I said one day as we sat at the win- 
dows of our tiny sitting room and watched the pouring rain, "the 
bones are coming through!" Mama did not deign to turn around, 
but went on watching the flood. "I think, girls," she said presently, 
"that there will be plenty of water on the ranch, after all." 

We all laughed, and then in came our little landlady and joined, 
without in the least knowing what we were laughing at. 

She was a little, dried up wisp of a woman, like a brown twig. 
She came from a New England state, and was as much out of 
place in California as a fish out of water. What sort of land was 
this, where house work was not looked upon as a religious rite; 
where women", if they chose, could put out their wash on Wednes- 
day, instead of Monday; where canneries produced such splendid 
jams and jellies that many housekeepers had given up entirely the 
old idea that nothing could be done as well outside the home as 
within it, and no more spent hot summer days stewing themselves 
and their fruit over cooking stoves? Everything was "different" 
here; therefore, to be condemned! 

She was forever "redding up" her house and entertaining us 
girls with stories of the multitudinous duties she performed when a 
girl in her old home town. She continually chewed her false teeth 
with an irritating clicking sound, and her black eyes snapped and 
her withered cheeks glowed, as she concluded her ramblings with: 
"And I always says" (click, click) "hard work never killed no-one!" 

We had listened politely to innumerable tales of New England 
prowess, and were just beginning to think of some desperate plan 
of action whereby to escape without necessitating a plunge into the 
weather outside, when Maggie, who had been absent for several 
hours, rushed in — bedraggled, breathless, her hat over one ear, her 
face as red as a lobster's, and her small green eyes starting out of 
her head. 

"I have to tell you, ma'am," she gasped — effectively stopping 
the New England reminiscences — "I have to tell you that the byes 
have gone entirely!" (To be continued next week.) 



— The other day a San Francisco police judge, who had been 
presiding over what they call the women's court, publicly thanked 
a committee of club women who had sat day after day in his 
court to watch the proceedings. I don't suppose there is anywhere 
else in the world where so ridiculous a thing could happen. Here 
we have a self-appointed committee which regularly visits the court 
to keep tab on the judge, for it goes for no other purpose — an in- 
solent and impertinent interference with the administration of jus- 
tice. And yet so timorous is the judge and so afraid of the 
political power of these women that he actually thanks them for 
their grotesque presence. We are really governed by small irre- 
sponsible cliques, such as these, who assume power which they are 
not granted and to which our officials are servilely obsequious. 




The Mightiest 
Servant in California 

Eioht thousand people — employees of the P G and E — gave 
of their best efforts during 1 9 2 2 in order that Pacific Service (gas 
and electricity) might contribute its maximum to your comfort, 
convenience, pleasure and general well-being day and night. 

The measure of the success of these efforts lies in your satisfac- 
tion. Should your satisfaction with Pacific Service not be com- 
plete for any reason, we will deem it a favor if you will call at 
the local P G and E office and discuss the cause in detail. 

PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 

A California company with 3 5,000 security holders in the state 

P> • (J • ancf TPl . 

"PACIFIC SERVICE" 



4-223 



y 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 10. 1923 




'Oat OUwiff/ij- IhedmLar. *&p* 

— Have our local journals lost all sense of proportion or is the 
public mind so debauched by the stories of the film that it will be 
satisfied with nothing but the most intimate pornographic details? 
A young dancer claims to have been seduced by her dancing partner, 
surely a common enough story! She declares motherhood to be 
impending; not at all an unusual conclusion. She brings suit for 
breach of promise, her erstwhile partner having married in the in- 
terval, also quite an ordinary state of affairs. But the papers spread 
the story in all its details and an Oakland paper runs three columns 
a day for four days of the most complete and indeed meticulous 
account of all the proceedings between the parties. This cannot 
be justified on any grounds of news or of public benefit. It is 
nothing short of pandering and deserves the severest sort of repri- 
mand. Still, we find the same tendency to be quite universal and 
even the modern pulpit is by no means exempt. Yet we are not 
all dirty apes. 

— The Wilmot case bears testimony again to the fearlessly ef- 
ficient way in which Judge Van Fleet administers justice in the 
federal courts and should be a warning to police officials and others 
to keep their fingers off matters of federal concern. There is no 
question that even the police are not above coming to the help 
of people in whom, for financial or other reasons, they have an in- 
terest. A body like the federal grand jury which backs up the work 
of an efficient judge is also a great asset to the community and 
the business men which compose that jury have always aided in 
keeping the community out of the slough into which local slackness 
would soon land us. It was a very poor excuse for Captain Goff 
to declare, after the matter was over, that he had been deceived 
in the character of Wilmot. It is the business of a good police 
officer not to be deceived in the character of accused persons. That 
is why they are employed, for assuredly the rest of us have no chance 
to investigate. 

— Gerald Beaumont, the stort story writer, leaves Alameda be- 
cause he cannot stand the flies. We had no idea that there was so 
much life in Alameda; but when you come to think of it flies are 
merely life around the dead, they muster thick where the carcase is. 
And Beaumont does not like the flies. Small blame to him for he 
knows where those flies come from. They come off the manure 
which the market gardners leave exposed and which breeds them. 
That is not pretty to think about, not at all pretty for a resident 
of Alameda ; for fertilizer flies are apt to make more fertilizer out 
of humans. On the whole, considering the provocation, one is 
tempted to decide that Mr. Beaumont is justified of his exit and 
that for a short story writer, he shows uncommon good sense. But 
we advise Alameda to cease its worship of Beelezebub, who was 
the god of flies and against whom we find many animadversions in 
holy writ. Better clean house, lose the flies and keep the short 
story writer. 

* * * 

— Now and again something happens which tends to upset the no- 
tions which we have formed as to fame and distinction. "You 
must stir it and stump it, and blow your own trumpet, or trust me 
you haven't a chance," sings W. S. Gilbert, and that is the theory 
on which most lives are based and the way in which the more 
ambitious seek to realize their ends. And then comes a some- 
thing like the beautiful life of Sister Mary Columba, a nun devoted 



to inconspicuous and lovely deeds. One would have thought that 
she had made no mark on the world at large, so sweet and unob- 
trusive was her life. But she dies, and the throngs to do her honor 
at her funeral spring up from the very ground, as it were. Her 
quiet good deeds had given her not only love but an enduring 
fame. We call attention to this on the part of those ladies who 
think to bombard the gates of glory in a high falsetto. Even in 
these degenerate days, goodness seems to stand as fair a chance 
as dress and histrionics. 



— Nobody rejoices more than the Town Crier at the success of 
the Community Chest. It is a valiant attempt to solve reasonably 
a civic problem which is always with us and helps to secure the 
ordinary citizen from fraud. But objection must be made to the 
methods of coercion used. I was in an office, engaged in business 
with a professional man, when two of the collectors for this meri- 
torious fund impatiently forced their way into his inner office. They 
demanded funds as one might say "hands up." He hesitated, as 
his mind was full of the business on which we had talked. There- 
upon one of the collectors said in a menacing tone: "Very well, 
I will report you." This was enough to make the gorge of a free- 
born American rise, and my professional friend was filled with help- 
less wrath. I saw this myself and I cannot say that the methods 
employed are calculated to endear the Community Chest to the 
heart of the average citizen. Suaviter in modo, my dears, particu- 
larly when you are asking somebody for something. 



— All the commissions are going down like ninepins and the fence 
which was so elaborately fixed by the late progressives to ensure 
orderly progress in the state is being uprooted. On every hand we 
hear complaints from the heads of the various state commissions 
here in San Francisco that they cannot do work with the appro- 
priations fixed by the governor. Well and good, we shall see. Some 
have said that these commissions were in the nature of an insurance 
for the maintenance of order and good feeling between different 
classes in the community. Others think that the insurance comes 
too high. They don't think so in England and in the British com- 
monwealths; but we shall see. There are some rather useful peo- 
ple who will be out of work in consequence and some very fine 
contributions to the social life will henceforth cease. Of course, 
also, some grafters will perish as well. But the Town Crier is con- 
servative enough to wish to perpetuate that which has done very 
well on the whole and given us a physical basis perhaps higher than 
anywhere else in the world. 



SEVENTH ANNUAL 

PACIFIC 
AUTO SHOW 

Exposition Auditorium 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Feb. 1 7th to 24th 

Complete Showing of New 1923 Models 
"America's Most Beautiful Auto Show" 

G. A. Wahlgreen, Mgr. 



February 10. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




A FEBRUARY BOOK CHAT 

By KEM 

THE Print Society, an international society of makers and col- 
lectors of prints, at Woodgreen Common, Breamore, Hampshire, 
England, will publish this month a second edition of their volume, 
"On Making and Collecting Etchings," and in April another volume, 
"Sixty-six Etchings," a book sumptuously illustrated with reproduc- 
tions of examples of most of the graphic processes. 

"The American Magazine of Art" says of the first volume : "It is 
a book that one would wish to keep as a reference, but which may 
be read from cover to cover with the utmost pleasure." Both these 
volumes may be ordered by communicating direct with the above 
society. 

A MAN'S COUNTRY, by Peter Clark MacFarlane, one of our 
California writers, who has given a very satisfactory modern Ameri- 
can story in which Big Business and romance are mixed in just the 
right proportions to please the average reader. It starts in with a poor 
boy who meets a fairy-princess, rich little girl and thereafter is burst- 
ing with ambition until he can meet her as an equal as far as money 
can accomplish. Nothing unusual about the story, but the boy is a 
real boy and one has to like him and to accept the girl and her beauty 
and her little exactions and her pretty love-making which stand out 
against a dramatic, thundering automobile factory. The story finishes 
in the way to please not only the demanding "live-happy-forever- 
after" readers, but the more exacting ones with a psycho-analytical 
bias. Altogether a book that would make a good gift for either a 
man or woman who didn't care for a mushy novel or for one that 
required alternate holding of the book and one's nose. Published by 
Cosmopolitan. — $2. 

ENCHANTED APRIL, by "Elizabeth." The charming story of four 
markedly different types of women spending a month together in a 
small castle in Italy. "The wisteria tumbling over itself in excess of 
life — the sun blazing on scarlet geraniums. . . nasturtiums in 

great heaps and marigolds so brilliant they seemed to be burning" — 
Mrs. Wilkins so steeped in happiness because of this beauty and be- 
cause for a month she was rid of her husband; the wonderful meals 
prepared by the wonderful cook and which one feels brought about 
the solving of some truly "Elizabethan" matrimonial romances and 
problems — all this and more leave the reader both amused and hap- 
pily satisfied. Published by Doubleday, Page & Co. — $1 .90. 

if, .*£ %. 

WANDERER OF THE WASTELAND, by Zane Gray. "One of his 
very best books as far as descriptions go," some of his very devoted 
admirers say. and the many who enjoy the good outdoors will put 
up with the impossible, beautiful women, who fall in love one after 
another with the hero, and with the remarkable villains who dog his 
footsteps, in order to get the real thrills evoked by his account of the 
famous Death Valley. Published by Harpers. — $2. 
* * # 

TUMBLEWEEDS, by Hal G. Evarts. It is a story of the opening 
of the Cherokee Strip. A tale of lawless days when men carried guns 
and used then as a matter nf course, and the transforming of a 
cattle country into a region of cultivated farms. Little, Brown & 

Co.— $1.75. 



BRING ME HIS EARS, by Clarence Mulford. proclaims itself by 
its name as a story of bloodthirsty Mexican banditti. McClurg. — 
$1.90. 

SUZANNA. A Story of Early California Life, by Harry Sinclair 
Drago, is proving both a successful novel and screen story. Macaulay. 
—$1.75. 



COAL MINING ACCIDENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN 

In the coal mines of Great Britain about a million men are em- 
ployed each year, or approximately one-third more than the num- 
ber employed in this country, according to W. W. Adams, stasti- 
tician of the United States Bureau of Mines. The yearly output 
of coal is around 300 million tons, less than half the production 
in the United States. Fatal accidents vary in number from 1100 to 
1200 per year; in 1920, the latest year available, the number was 
1 1 03. In the United States the fatalities vary from 2000 to 2500 
per year. In a day's work the British miner produces less than one- 
third as much coal as the quantity by the American miner in the 
same length of time. Differences of conditions in the two coun- 
tries make it difficult to compare the frequency of mine accidents, 
but accepting the record as it stands, the British accident for every 
1 000 men employed varies from 1 .00 to 1 .30, while in the United 
States it is from 3.90 to 4.60 each year. 

It would be difficult to account completely for the lower rate 
in the British mines, but among the factors to which the lower rate 
may doubtless be partly attributed are the experience possessed by 
the miners in Great Britain, many of the men having been bred to 
the occupation through several generations; the slower speed with 
which the men work as indicated by the smaller daily output per 
man; the use of a common language so that safety instructions may 
be understood; the less extensive use of machinery, only about 13 
per cent of the British coal being undercut by machines as com- 
pared with over 50 per cent of the bituminous coal produced in 
this country; greater caution in timbering at the face, and shale 
dusting of the mines to reduce the probability of explosions. In 
Great Britain the use of shale dust is required by law. 



PUBLIC SALES 



We have purchased 122.000 pair L*. S. Army Mun- 
son last shoes, sizes ?'_■ to 12. which was the entire 
surplus stock of i>ne of the largest U. S. Govern- 
ment shoe contractors. 

This slice is guaranteed one hundred percent solid 
leather, color dark tan, bellows tongue, dirt and 
waterproof. The actual value of this shoe is $6.00. 
Owing to this tremendous buy we can offer same 
to the public at $2.95. 

Send correct size. Pay postman on delivery or send 
money order. It' shoes arc not as represented we 
will cheerfully refund your money promptly upon 
request. 

NATIONAL BAY STATE SHOE COMPANY 

-"'<' Broadway, New York. X. Y. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 10, 1923 



Have You Heard It? 

!gBsi!Hsa®s®@se(SH3ssessas 

—An Irishman, being awakened suddenly in the night by a cry 
of fire, hastily donned his trousers and leaped from a second-story 
window. He alighted safely on the ground, but stood looking down 
at his trousers, which in his excitement he had put on hindside 
before. 

A fireman came up to him and said: "Did the fall hurt you, 

Pat?" 

"No," said Pat. "Divil a bit did it hurt me, but it gave me a 
divil av a twisht." 

* * * 

Barney Oldfield relates that he was once in partnership with 

Henry Ford, but afterwards dissolved that union and went with 
some one else. Some time later a friend of the Detroit manufac- 
turer made the statement to him: 

"Well, Hank, Barney Oldfield helped to make you." 
"Yes," replied Mr. Ford, "and I helped to make him." 
When next Barney saw his former partner he asked him if he 
had said such a thing, and Mr. Ford readily admitted that he had. 
"Well, all I've got to say," answered the noted racer, "is, that if 
I helped to make you and you helped to make me, I did a lot 
better job than you did!" 

— The new squire was a man of artistic temperament, and when 
he came to the Hall he laid out the extensive gardens with the ut- 
most good taste, placing no fewer than six statues in various parts 
of the grounds. 

Said an old farmer who chanced to visit the grounds during the 
temporary absence of the squire: "I doan't see the need for all 
these scarecrows. Why, any one of 'em's enough to frit crows off 
a ten acre field." 

— A Boston man who was spending his vacation in a small town 
in eastern Main, entered the local barber shop for a shave. 

As the barber worked he made several slips of the razor, and at 
each of these occasions he would paste a small piece of paper over 
the cut to stop the bleeding. 

When he finally got through, the man passed him a dollar, and 
as the barber started for change remarked: "Keep the change. It 
is worth a dollar to be shaved by so gifted a man. Why, man, 
you are a barber, a butcher, and a paper hanger." 

— An enterprising coal dealer in Montreal adopted for his "slogan," 
which he printed on his stationery, the following motto, "It's a Black 
business but we treat you White." 

A customer, upon receiving his account recently for his supply 
of coal at the price of $22 per ton, inclosed his check in pay- 
ment, and at the same time suggested that the merchant should 
change his motto to read: "It's a Dirty business, but we Clean you 
Good." 

— A widow with a small son had married again and shortly after 
they were settled in their new home it became necessary for the 
family to move to another part of the city. 

The little four-year-old was so very well satisfied where he was 
that he had to be coaxed into the idea of the change. Among his 
many objections to the plan was: "And I 'spose we'll have to change 
our name again when we move into that house." 




BLOSSOM 

Know you the Kentish borders, 
With Sussex close behind? 
In the busy town I sit — 
And dream — and call to mind 
Mile after mile of Orchard 
In the full tide of Spring, 
Sweet with a thousand perfumes, 
And white with blossoming. 

From Ham-Street into Appledore — 
And on — again — and on — 
Where like a fairy-isle, snow-girt, 
Lies shy Kenardington; 
Up the hill to Wittersham— 
And turn again, and then — 
By the toll-gate at Small Hythe 
That leads to Tenterden. 

Through aisles of trembling blossom- 
Neath the blue arch of sky — 
By winding lanes to Peasmarsh — 
And back again to Rye; 
Out on the Romney marches — 
For company the sheep. 
Might I wander in my dreams 
I could not choose but sleep. . . . 
— M. E. Mason. 



LINES FROM "ODE TO A GRECIAN URN" 

A thing of beauty is a joy forever: 

Its loveliness increases: it will keep 

A bower quiet for us, and a sleep 

Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing. 

Therefore, on every morrow, are we wreathing 

A flowery band to bind us to the earth, 

Spite of despondence, of the inhuman dearth 

Of noble natures, of the gloomy days, 

Of all the unhealthy and o'er-darkened ways 

Made for our searching: yes, in spite of all, 

Some shape of beauty moves away the pall 

From our dark spirits. 

— Keats. 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

239 Post Street San Francisco 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



'The Largest Fire Insurance Company in 
America" 

FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, WINDSTORM, 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 



February 10, 1923 AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

j a Z :: "KKKSOKSfK « :_; ;i :; :; :; a H a :: tCtt :t a H it ■.« « a j; a. !i a a a'a a m a «^.«k»:«!X»'.wk» k"h h'k.k « « h tt h H :t «'«'« «"'w n j: x'a 



11 



K'K :; annua w 11 



Art is Long 



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liHBJlllBH^aBlgBBBBBBBBBIlBBHBBHEHiMBBHBBHHBSaHllBBBHBK 

By FARRAND LEWYS 




WHEN I entered the hall I met the eye of the Exponent of the 
New Art, and like the Ancient Mariner, he cast a spell on 
me, and I drifted towards him, as though he were a floating spar, 
(to continue the simile), and I were foundering in this sea of be- 
wildering color. 

I had talked before to a teacher of art, and I mentioned to him 
some of the things she had said to me, and the paintings in the 
exhibit which we had both liked. 

He snorted. "Show me the things that you both liked," he said, 
pre-emptorily, and so I, trembling at my own assurance, took him 
first to a portrait by Lynch of a young girl. To me, she seemed a 
fair young thing of high degree, exquisitely finished, composed, 
haughty, and yet with intense fire behind her blue eyes — keen, search- 
ing, hungry for life. 

He threw up his hands, as if to ward her off. "Don't! Don't!" 
he cried imploringly; "that candy-box girl! How can you?" "I 
suppose you admire that style?" I pointed to a half-painted daub 
of a woman in a stiff hat — impressionistic, only without the usual 
impressionistic color. "Why, yes, that is better," he answered. "It 
looks like a cover on "Sappy Stories,' " I said maliciously. I pointed 
to some others — Bricard's "Baby With Cat," and "Girl With Rose 
Turban," full of soft color, and portraying the wide, misty intro- 
spective eyes of the very young, the same look that comes back 
again to the very old; to "A Parisian," that dare-devil of Do- 
mergue's, two beautiful nudes, one a woman at her bath, half draw- 
ing back through the parted curtains, another a young girl, lithe, 
delicately rounded, with the indescribable virgin-bloom upon her; 
both tinted like living flesh and blood. 

"H'm, yes, rather good, but my dear woman, all this stuff you 
like is passe'. You must be educated up to this new art, for it is 
not a passing fad, it is going to endure — " He grew more em- 
phatic: "You are standing still, you must wake up; try, try to 
see the beauty in this wonderful exhibit. San Francisco does not 
realize that she has stood still in art, while the rest of the world 
has gone on." He darted to the painting of a wild-eyed woman; 
"Look at that! At first the eyes were too much for me, but now 
I can look at it without seeing them." 

The eyes were the only features in the picture that looked alive 
to me, and they looked too much alive, if you see what I mean. 
I wouldn't want to be alone with those eyes, someway! 

"This new art," he went on, "is an art that believes in leaving 
much to the imagination. A finished painting is a dead painting, 
just as a finished man is a dead man." 

"That is why, I suppose, Rodin never finishes his sculpture?" I 
said; "for instance, that up-turned face in the 'Call to Arms.' is 
left undone?" 

"When you stand close to the statue," he answered gravely, "you 
can't see the up-turned face of the man, so why should it be fin- 
ished?" 

I tried to imagine the state of things, should this idea be carried 
out in other vocations and affairs of life. A carpenter might say: 
"Since you can't see the rear wall of the house from the street, 
we didn't build a rear wall!" Or the dressmaker could inform you 
"that it was quite unnecessary to make any back to your gown, 
as the people facing you could only see the front." Dear! Dear! 
What strange looking objects we would be, walking down Market 



street! I visualized some of the men and women I know — I pulled 
my face straight, and tried to listen respectfully, although wierd 
thoughts were passing through my mind, and I harked back to my 
childhood days, to Grimm's fairy tales of the strange gnomes living 
inside of mountains, who had only faces and fronts to their bodies, 
and no backs; (do you remember?) 

We passed on until we reached that fat little green tiger cat of 
Cezanne's — Cezanne the great, Cezanne the wonderful! Cezanne 
the originator of this new art! Cezanne, to whom all artists of the 
modern school bow in homage. (Cezanne! Cezanne! what crimes 
are committed in thy name!) It is a jolly little tiger cat; you want 
to put your foot on its little round belly, and roll it over; I would 
have bought it for my children's nursery, only I haven't any child- 
ren! I might have been willing to pay — well, say ten dollars for it. 
I looked at the price list — "A Tiger," — Cezanne — $6000. Perhaps 
they have made a mistake? They meant $60 surely? Perhaps $600? 
No! $6000! I gasped, gurgled and burst out laughing. 

I passed on, to gaze curiously at the painting of a buxom young 
woman, sitting very erect, with either a feather hat or a young 
cloud resting on her head. " 'Death of Ophelia,' Redon — $4000," I 
read. 

I escaped into another room. Henri-Martin's "spot work" caught 
my eye. It is pleasing, if you stand far enough away from it. The 
perspective is good, the flickering shadows of the leaves on the gravel 
walk, the rich purples and spring-like greens, a riot of color that 
appeals to the color sense — "That? But that is the early impres- 
sionistic work of twenty-five years ago!" Alas! Passe' again! 

Vauthrin's "Return of the Schooners" appealed to me; "I like 
Vauthrin's ships," I ventured; my companion groaned. 

He pointed to a painting of "still life:" bright red fish on a table 
that is tipping dangerously, (the cat will eventually get those fish, 
it is easy to predict that!) with a background of purple and yel- 
low and blue stripes — "Look at that! Look at that color! So won- 
derfully put on!" 

t Duvent's "Gate at Verdun, during the War," "Allied Troops in 
Paris," "American Soldier in France," — the subjects sadden one, 
but they were pictures, real pictures, showing skill, detail, right col- 
oring, proportion, perspective. But alas, they were all finished pic- 
tures, therefore quite passe', quite, quite dead! 

I gave a last look at the dying Ophelia, at the little green tiger 
cat, at the tipped table, the wild-eyed lady, and the savage forms 
slashed out by Rodin's scalpel, and then found myself out under 
the evening sky. To my surprise, the houses were all standing up- 
right, and not topsy-turvy, the pavement was a soft grey, instead 
of streaked purple and red. and the stars shed a shimmering yel- 
low glow from out the dark blue of the sky. Nature, as far as I 
could see, looked quite natural; therefore, it was passe', finished, 
dead. It could not, for a moment, be classed under the precepts 
of the modern school of art! 



— For the first dinner in their new home the bride had made a 
pie. "I am afraid," she said, as she helped her husband to a slice, 
"that I have left something out. and that it isn't very good." 

The husband tasted it and said. "There is nothing, my dear, you 
could have left out that would make a pie taste like this. It's 
something you've put in." 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 10, 1923 




ociot 




BUSY CUPID 

HATHAWAY-JEFFERYS — An interesting engagement announced 
Monday was that of Miss Mabel Clancy Hathaway, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. William Lee Hathaway, to Mr. Louis McKim 
Jefferys. The news was told at a luncheon given by the bride- 
to-be at the Fairmont Hotel in honor of Mrs. William Shu- 
man (Cornelia Clampett). Miss Hathaway is one of the most 
popular girls of the younger set. She was graduated during 
the war, and on that account never made her formal debut, 
but enlisted as a motor corps girl, in which service she did 
wonderful work. Her sister, Mrs. John Douglas Short (Marie 
Hathaway) is one of the popular young matrons in San Fran- 
cisco society. Mr. Jefferys comes from an old family in this 
city. He is the son of Mrs. Henry Scott Jefferys and the late 
Rev. Jefferys, and both his father and grandfather were rec- 
tors of Trinity Episcopal Church in this city. His sisters are 
Mrs. Arthur Butler Selby and Mrs. Hugo Ramacciotti. A 
brother, Mr. James Jefferys, is in business in Manila. The 
marriage will be an event of the autumn. 
NIXON-WILHOIT — At a simple home wedding solemnized last 
Friday, Mrs. Bertram Nixon became the bride of John Wil- 
hoit. The wedding was witnessed by about twenty guests, the 
immediate relatives of both families and a very few very inti- 
mate friends. The bride was unattended, her young son, 
Stuart Nixon, acting as the ring-bearer. The home was con- 
verted into a bower of spring blossoms for the happy occasion. 
In the afternoon the bride and groom departed for Vancouver, 
B. C, After a short stay there they will go east by way of 
the Canadian Rockies and will sail from New York on Feb- 
ruary 20 for a six months' stay abroad. Mrs. Wilhoit, who 
is one of the most attractive young women in San Francisco 
society, is the widow of Bertram Nixon, son or the late Sena- 
tor Nixon of Nevada. Mr. Wilhoit is the son of the late George 
E. Wilhoit of Stockton. 
MUNSELL-KNOWLES — The engagement was recently announced 
in New York of Miss Juliet Dows Munsell of San Francisco 
to Harold Wilbur Knowles of New York and Cleveland. Miss 
Munsell has made her home in San Francisco for several years. 
After graduating from Miss Murison's School she attended 
Smith College and later graduated from the University of 
California. Since her return from Europe, Miss Munsell has 
been visiting her brother in New York, but she expects soon 
to return to California. The marriage will occur in April. Mr. 
Knowles is an electrical engineer, a graduate of Cornell. 
HAWKINS-HIGH — Miss Helen Hawkins and Thornton High will 
be married this Saturday at the home of the bride-elect's 
mother in this city. It will be a small, simple ceremony, 
with Miss Edith von Rhein and Miss Helen Hammersmith 
as bridesmaids, and the groom's brother, Kenneth High, as 
best man. They had planned a more elaborate wedding after 
Easter, but business plans made it more convenient to take 
the honeymoon tour at this time. They will make their home 
here. 
SINGER-BROWN — At a reception of several hundred relatives 
and friends at the Hotel Richelieu, Mr. and Mrs. M. Singer 
announced the engagement of their daughter, Miss Betty 
Singer, to Mr. William A. Brown on Sunday evening. The ball 
room and Pergola Court were used for the occasion. The 
young couple, who are very popular in the younger set, will 
be married shortly. Dancing was enjoyed in the ball room 
which was beautifully decorated for the occasion. 
HARRISON-LECK — Miss Agnes Harrison and Hallock Vander 
Leek will be married at the Edward C. Harrison home on 
Washington street on the evening of February 21 at 9 o'clock. 
Miss Mary Harrison will be her sister's maid of honor and 
the bridesmaids will be Miss Katherine Maxwell, Miss Marion 
Dunne, Miss Ethel Bryte of Sacramento and Miss Miriam 
Settlemeier of Pasadena. Preston Stewart will be best man. 

LUNCHEONS 

SPRECKELS — Mrs. Adolph Spreckels, who will leave the end 
of the month for France, when she will be accompanied by 
her daughter, Miss Alma Spreckels, was a luncheon hostess 
Tuesday at the Hotel St. Francis. 

LENT — Mrs. Eugene Lent was a luncheon hostess Tuesday at her 
home in Pacific avenue. 



ZEILE — In honor of Mrs. George Perkins Raymond (Helen C. 
Jones) of New York, who is visiting her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Clinton Jones, in this city, Miss Marion Zeile entertained 
at a luncheon Monday at the Hotel St. Francis. The guests 
bidden to meet the former San Franciscan included: Mrs. 
Arthur Chesebrough, Mrs. Horace Hill, Mrs. John Gallois, 
Mrs. Fentress Hill, Mrs. Charles Templeton Crocker, Mrs. 
Jerome Politzer, Mrs. William Henry Pool, Mrs. Rudolph 
Schilling, Mrs. Carl Wolff, Miss Sara Coffin and Miss Louise 
Boyd. 

CUSHMAN — Mrs. Olive Reed Cushman was hostess at a small 
luncheon at the Fairmont Saturday in honor of her niece, 
Miss Ruth St. Clair Reed, a bride-elect, the sister of Miss 
Olive Reed, the talented violinist. 

HOWARD — Mrs. George H. Howard had a few friends at a lunch- 
eon party at Howard House in San Mateo recently in honor 
of Miss Sara Redington of Santa Barbara, who is here on a 
visit with relatives. 

ST. FRANCIS — Monday's sunshine lured scores of the fashionable 
folk up from the peninsula, and the Garden and Fable room 
of the Hotel St. Francis were the scene of many informal 
luncheon parties previous to an afternoon of shopping or at- 
tendance at the matinee of the Salons Intimes in the Colonial 
ballroom of the hotel. 

Mrs. George Newhall, Mrs. Mountford Wilson and Mrs. Walter 
Filer were a congenial group at one of tne cozy tables in 
the Garden. Mrs. Robert Hays Smith and Mrs. Ross Ambler 
Curran were together. Mrs. Ritchie Dunn had Miss Celia 
O'Connor and Mrs. Virginia Ford with her, and Mrs. Laur- 
ance I. Scott and Mrs. Herbert Fleishhacker were another 
of the small groups. At another table Mrs. Arthur Rose Vin- 
cent was hostess to Mrs. Gerald Rathbone, Mrs. George Cam- 
eron and Mrs. Raymond Welch. 

TERRY — Mrs. Wallace I. Terry entertained at a luncheon Mon- 
day at the Francisca Club in honor of Mrs. Harriet Chalmers 
Adams, who was a former Californian but now makes her 
home at the nation's capital. She is a noted lecturer and trav- 
eler and is visiting her sister, Mrs. Lander Redman, in this city 
and is coming in for a great deal of social attention from 
her many old friends here. 

TEAS 

PAYNE — In honor of Miss Elizabeth Barrette and her sister, Miss 
Lydia Barrette. daughter of General and Mrs. John Barrette, 
who are visiting at the Redmond Payne home in Washington 
street, Miss Betsy Payne entertained at an informal tea last 
Friday. 

WESTON — Miss Mary Bernice Moore, one of the winter's buds, 
and Miss Miriam Trowbridge, who will be a February bride, 
shared honors at a tea given on Saturday afternoon by Miss 
Agnes Weston at her home in Union street. 

O'CONNOR-MORBIO — Mrs. Charles H. O'Connor and her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Carlo S. Morbio. assembled a group of friends at 
tea at the Palace Hotel Monday to meet Mrs. Edilberto An- 
derson, who returned recently from abroad, and her future 
sister-in-law. Miss Frances Moore, who is to marry Leslie 
Taylor of Piedmont this week. 

BENJAMIN — Mrs. Lucile Joullin Benjamin, well known among 
the artists of California, was the guest of honor at a tea 
given by a number of her friends at the Hotel St. Francis 
on Saturday afternoon. Mrs. Benjamin is giving an exhibi- 
tion of her paintings this month until February 15, making 
a special showing of a number of Indian studies that she made 
on a recent visit to the southwest. 




Under the guidance of R. H. Collins and his as- 
sociates, the Peerless was bound to be a better 
and better Peerless. The public response came 
quickly and is indicated by augmented sales in old 
Peerless strongholds and throughout the country 
in general. 

Pioneer Motor Company 

OP SAN FRANCISCO 

1900 Van Ness Ave., Corner Washington St. 
Telephone Prospect 8800 



February 10. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



PAGE — Mrs. Ralston Page was hostess at nn informal tea Tues- 
day afternoon, at her home, when she entertained in compli- 
ment to Mrs. Horace Van Sicklen. who left Wednesday for the 
cast. Mrs. Page was assisted in receiving by Mrs. Herbert 
O'Brien. Mrs. George Pinckard. Mrs. Charles L. Buckingham. 
Mrs. Walter Baldwin, Mrs. Charles Corbet and Mrs. Edward 
Pringle. 

BRIDGE 

MILLER — Mr. and Mrs. Harry East Miller entertained the mem- 
bers of their bridge club Wednesday evening at their home 
in Oakland. There are twenty-four members to this small 
organization, which have been meeting throughout the winter 
for an informal evening at cards. 

McCORMICK — Mrs. Charles McCormick entertained the mem- 
bers of her bridge club at luncheon Monday at her home 
in Vallejo street. Following the luncheon the little group 
of friends enjoyed an afternoon of cards. 

DAVIS — Miss Mary and Miss Ruth Davis will give a bridge 
tea at their home next Tuesday for Miss Margery Lovegrove, 
who will marry Dorhmann Pischel in the summer. 

MOORE — Miss Katherine Bentley, fiancee of Raymond Phelps of 
New York, and Miss Margaret Buckbee, who will become the 
bride of Jack Boyden in April, will share the honors at the 
bridge luncheon which Miss Elizabeth Moore will give at her 
home in Piedmont on February 16. 

SNODGRASS — Mrs. Harold Snodgrass will give a bridge tea at 
her home next Tuesday for Mrs. Chester Irving Williams, 
formerly Miss Ruth Prior. 

STEELE — Mrs. James Mortimer Steele gave a bridge tea re- 
cently in honor of her mother, Mrs. Robert Garrett of Texas, 
who is here visiting at the home of Lieutenant and Mrs. 
Steele at Mare Island. The afternoon was also a welcome to 
other newcomers. 

FOSTER — In honor of her house guest, Miss Dorothy Higbie of 
Chicago, Miss Helen Foster entertained informally at bridge 
in her apartments at the Hotel St. Francis Tuesday. 
DINNERS 

MADISON — Mr. and Mrs. William Shuman, who are the incen- 
tives for many of the parties in younger society circles, were 
the guests of honor at a dinner which Mr. and Mrs. Marshall 
Madison gave Tuesday evening. The party was held at. the 
Madison home and those present included Mr. and Mrs. Russell 
Slade, Mr. and Mrs. Wilder Bowers, Mr. and Mrs. Harold 
Casey, Miss Jane Carrigan, Mr. Frank Kennedy and Mr. 
Jerd Sullivan. 

BAZET — Dr. and Mrs. Louis Bazet celebrated the second anni- 
versary of their wedding by giving a handsome dinner on 
Saturday evening at their home in Laguna street. 

FAGAN — Mr. and Mrs. Paul Fagan entertained at an informal 
dinner Friday evening and later, with their guests, attended 
the Bachelors' Ball at the San Francisco Golf and Country 
Club. 

McMULLIN — Mr. and Mrs. Latham McMullin entertained at a din- 
ner Tuesday evening at their home in Broadway, later at- 
tending the theater with their guests. 

PETTIGREW — In honor of Mr. and Mrs. Albeit E. Gillespie 
(Mrs. Claudine Cotton Warren), whose marriage was a re- 
cent event in San Francisco society. Mr. and Mrs. Percy L. 
Pettigrew will entertain at a dinner-dance this Saturday even- 
ing at the Callaghan home in Pacific avenue, formerly the 
Holbrook home. Mr. and Mrs. Gillespie have recently returned 
to town after spending their honeymoon in the southern part 
of the state. Mr. and Mrs. Pettigrew will leave next month 
for Europe, to be gone a year or longer. 

SUTTON — Mr. and Mrs. John G, Sutton gave a dinner-dance at 
the San Francisco Golf and Country Club on Saturday night 
in honor of Miss Adrienne Sharp, debutante daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Arthur Maxwell Sharp. The evening was a welcome 
to Miss Sharp upon her return from several weeks at a hos- 
pital following an operation for appendicitis shortly after her 
coming-out ball at the Hotel St. Francis. There were about 
seventy guests, many of them friends of Jack Sutton, a senior 
at the University of California, who will graduate this spring. 
The Suttons, with their two sons. Jack and Robert Sutton, 
will leave early this summer for Europe to pass several months 
in travel. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 



Van Neat* At*., nt tJeary Street 

is the moat refined family hotel in the eit> 
— a home unsurpassed 

r I MF.R M. tl'OODBl RY Manager 



SAN FRAN IM l> 



HANIHARA — Invitations are out for a reception and dinner to 
be given next Monday, February 12, in honor „f Masanao 
Hanihara, tile newly appointed ambassador from Japan to 
America, and Mrs. Hanihara, the event taking place at the 
Fairmount Hotel. The hosts of the affair are the Japan So- 
ciety of America, of which Francis B. Loomis is president 
and Consul-General and Mrs. S. Yada. 

KUHN — Mr. and Mrs. William S. Kuhn gave a dinner preceding 
the Bachelors' Ball at the Golf Club Friday. Mr. and Mrs 
Dearborn Clark also entertained dinner guests before the 
dance. 

HOOKER — Mr. and Mrs. Osgood Hooker celebrated their wed- 
ding anniversary informally Tuesday evening at their home 
in Burlingame. Their marriage twenty-six years ago was one 
of the notable fashionable events of the day. Mrs. Hooker 
was Miss Ella Goad, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. W. F. 
Goad, and one of the most beautiful girls in society, and her 
marriage was held in the old Goad home at Washington 
and Gough streets. 

DANCES 

MARIN GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB— Marin Golf and Country Club 
will give a valentine dance this Saturday, opening the sum- 
mer season with this affair. This is the first dance there in 
months. 

THE BACHELORS — As a return for the round of affairs they 
have been enjoying this winter, the bachelors of society gave 
a large dance Friday night at the San Francisco Golf and 
Country Club, some sixty or so of the young men joining to 
give an elaborate party. There were about 25 guests, in- 
cluding those who have been dancing at the debutante balls 
this winter. 

IN TOWN AND OUT 

CHESEBROUGH — Mrs. Arthur Chesebrough and her children, 
who make their home at the Newhall ranch at Newhall, will 
return to Southern California soon. They came north shortly 
before Christmas to spend the holidays with Mrs. Chese- 
brough's father, Mr. William Mayo Newhall, in Scott streft. 

MASTEN — Mrs. Joseph M. Masten has returned to her home in 
this city after several weeks' visit in San Diego, where she 
placed her daughter, Miss Kathryn Masten, at school in La 
Jolla. While in San Diego Mrs. Masten was the guest of Mrs. 
Henry L. Miller. 

DROWN — Miss Josephine Drown left Tuesday for Medford, Ore., 
where she will pass a fortnight or longer as the guest of 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Preston. Miss Jeanette Norris and Mrs. 
Preston Drown left last Tuesday for the north, and Miss 
Drown planned to accompany them, but her departure was 
delayed on account of a severe sore throat. 

McNEAR — Mr. and Mrs. John A. MeNear are entertaining as their 
house guest Miss Suzanne L'enclos, who returned to Cali- 
fornia a fortnight ago after a year's visit with her mother at 
the L'enclos home in Paris. Miss L'enclos visited at the 
MeNear home for several months two winters ago. 

GRUNBAUM — Miss Rosalie Grunbaum. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
L. F. Grunbaum, arrived home Tuesday after a visit of eight, 
weeks with friends in the east. Miss Grunbaum visited her 
brother-in-law and sister. Mr. and Mrs. John Burnham, in 
Salt Lake City en route west from Boston. 

CAMERON — Mr. and Mrs. George Cameron returned this week 
to their home in Burlingame, after having passed the mid- 
winter at the home of M. H. de Young on California street. 

WHITMAN — Miss Mary Whitman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Malcolm D. Whitman, is here from New York visiting her 
aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs Templeton Crocker. 

DEL MONTE — The Del Monte polo team is now in the south. 
They won both the junior and senior matches from the cham- 
pion Midwick four and are now tackling the strong River- 
side outfit. 

The Pacific Coast polo championship is to be held at Del 
Monte on March 23 to April 15. and all the teams will gather 
here at that time. The prospects are that it will be the biggest 
polo tournament ever held on the coast. There is a prob- 
ability that ten to twelve entries will be receh'ed. 
The U. S. 11th Cavalry of Monterey will send its crack polo 
team on the circuit next week. The players will ship their 
string of ponies and leave next Friday for Pasadena, where 
matches are scheduled with Midwick over the week end. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone gutter (lie Inder Management CARL S STANLEY 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 10, 1923 





l£INANOAy 

By P. N. BERINGER 




Fifth in Importance 

II SHOULD be the source of great grati- 
fication to the people of San Francisco, 
and in fact of the whole state, that this 
city has now reached the commanding po- 
sition of being the fifth city of the United 
States in point of bank clearings. The fig- 
ures published show San Francisco with bank 
clearings totalling $7,274,000,000 while at 
the same time this publication of clearings 
gives the position of Los Angeles at ninth 
in the number of those standing highest in 
the country. The figures for Los Angeles to- 
tal $5,153,31 1,000. 



Los Angeles' Position 

Information of this character is reliable 
and will dispose of many wild statements that 
Los Angeles stood highest in bank clearances 
on the coast. Seattle may now stop making 
faces at Los Angeles, as all the facts are es- 
tablished by the published figures and every- 
one should be satisfied. 



The Growth of a City 

It is doubted San Franciscans know just 
how fast this city is growing. These bank 
clearance figures give one an idea. The 
clearances have increased nearly 10 per cent 
over the bank clearances of 1921. But the 
very best evidence of growth is found in the 
building program for 1923. More building is 
now under contract and more is contem- 
plated, as to business and industrial struc- 
tures, as well as residences, than in any year 
since 1914. This is a fact, not only as to 
San Francisco but as to Oakland, where 
the building operations are beginning to ob- 
tain proportions amounting almost to a 
building boom. 



What It means 

The bank clearance figures are simply a 
correct tabulation of transactions between 
the various banks of the city, but these fig- 
ures also give an indication of the vastly 
larger sums involved in business transactions 
between citizens of this great metropolis. 



The Convention Habit. 

The convention habit, which is now a nor- 
mal one with San Francisco, is a mighty good 
condition to get into. We have a great con- 
vention every day or two and nothing we 
could possibly do advertises San Francisco 
to the world at large so thoroughly as a con- 
vention gathering. This week we have had 
an Episcopalian gathering of the great not- 
ables in that church and this is also the 
week selected by the furniture men for the 
furniture week display. This furniture week 
has become a regular yearly affair and it is 



a very good way to create a feeling in the 
public for better homes and there certainly 
is a need for that kind of propoganda, not 
only here but all over the country, so that, 
while the furniture men are advertising their 
wares they are doing a worthy missionary 
work at the same time. 



Intercoastal Trade 

The growth of trade in an intercoastal 
way is shown by the number of lines now 
engaged in this business of carrying freight 
by sea, via the canal from the Atlantic to 
the Pacific and from the Pacific to the At- 
lantic. The latest development, in in- 
tercoastal shipping business, is the estab- 
lishment of a line of refrigeration ships. Thus 
fresh fruit and other so-called perishables 
may be carried from here to the Atlantic and 
delivered at the various Atlantic ports in just 
as fresh a condition as when leaving San 
Francisco. The practice is not an experi- 
ment at all and the Chilean government has 
proven conclusively that fruit may be 
brought in a perfectly fresh condition from 
Valparaiso to New York. There is no rea- 
son at all why fruit and grape shipments 
should not be made in just as successful a 
way from San Francisco to New York. 



The Bond and Security Market 

Bonds and securities are in great demand 
and the sales are quite brisk in standard 
issues. The situation, while it is not appar- 
ent to the lay man, is in much better shape 
than it has been for some time. The condi- 
tion in Europe is, of course, reflected here 
in a great many ways and the settlement of 
the Turkish question to the satisfaction of 
all concerned is something over which all 
civilization should congratulate itself. The 
action of the French in the Ruhr and in 
other parts of occupied Germany is showing 
the world at large that Germany can pay 
and will be made to pay her debts. In 
occupied Germany the peop'-e are accepting 
the situation with a far better grace than 
was to have been expected and all they seem 
to ask, in the final analysis, is work and to 
be paid in real money. 



San Francisco's Back Country 

The San Franciscan should study the back 
country. The prosperity of any great city 
depends, in a commercial and an industrial 
sense, on the nature of the back country 
which feeds it and keeps it alive. In other 
words, it is simply a question of drainage. 
What kind of a country is it we depend upon 
for the present and the future development 
of our trade? Recently there has been cir- 
culated quite extensively a sketch map show- 



ing the interior valley of California and the 
cities that are to be found within this inland 
empire. San Francisco lacks nothing upon 
which to base its aspirations of always be- 
ing the leading city of a great state. It 
does not depend on one agricultural staple 
for its future prosperity but it has agricul- 
ture and mining of all descriptions to feed 
it for all time, and on the other hand its 
metropolitan center, the bay region, will 
eventually furnish the state with every man- 
ufactured article necessary to its happiness 
and continued prosperity. How many San 
Franciscans know anything at all about the 
state at large? It is time a study of the state 
were made by the average citizen as to its 
relationship to the city and vice versa. To 
look upon that map, with the desire to learn 
something, is just as necessary to the San 
Franciscan and Californian as it is to the 
citizen of the United States outside of Cali- 
fornia who may have a desire to come here 
for pleasure as a visitor or to stay as a resi- 
dent. 



New Secretary to Stock and 
Bond Exchange 

J. C. Whitman, for nine years associated 
with the State Civil Service Commission at 
Sacramento, has resigned his position there 
to take up the position of executive secre- 
tary to the San Francisco Stock and Bond 
Exchange. Mr. Whitman was in 1919 execu- 
tive secretary to the state committee on effi- 
ciency and economy, Albert Boynton, presi- 
dent of the Commonwealth Club of San 
Francisco, being the chairman. Mr. Whit- 
man brings to his new duties exceptional 
organizing ability and experience of a special 
character. The Stock and Bond Exchange 
may be congratulated on having secured his 
services. 



Chamber of Commerce Has 
New Industrial Program 

A new industries committee has been initi- 
ated by the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce, to furnish prospective manufacturers 
with information on proper sites and build- 
ings, transportation costs, raw materials, 
labor and housing facilities, markets, power 
and other public utility costs. Included in 
the committee are the following: Eli H. Weil, 
F. T. Letchfield, Colbert Coldwell, Barton 
Bean. Paul M. Downing, R. E. Fisher, W. 
H. French, A. K. Frye, M. C. Gibson, L. B. 
Mackey, C. K. Mcintosh, S. B. McNear and 
Whitman Symmes. 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter, Just Out 

370 Bush Street 
Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco. Cal. 



February 10. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



FILM FLICKS 



By AGNES KERR CRAWFORD 

ANTONIO MORENO and his bride, who 
was Mrs. Daisy Canfield Danzinger, 
who inherited $2,000,000 from her father, 
the late Charles A. Canfield, spent several 
days the first of last week in San Francisco. 
They are en route to New York, and are 
combining a honeymoon trip and business, 
as Moreno has just signed a five-year con- 
tract as a Lasky star. While here they pur- 
chased furniture for their new home at Lake 
Silver, to which they expect to go as soon 
as they return to California. 

Jackie Coogan confided to some of his 
admirers while in town the first of last week 
that he hadn't quite made up his mind 
whether to be a policeman or a fireman when 
he grows up; just now he favors the police- 
man. 

Frank B. Good, head camera man of the 
Jackie Coogan company, spent part of last 
week in San Francisco. Mr. Good, while 
Jackie is in the east, is lent to Warner Bros., 
and went on to the Feather River country 
checking up locations for Warner Bros.'s next 
picture. It will be called "Wolf Fang," and 
feature Rin Tin Tin, the Belgian police dog, 
said to have more than human intelligence. 

The Fisher Production Corporation of San 
Francisco will begin work in three weeks 
at the Pacific studios at San Mateo on their 
first picture. It will be a screen version of 
"Youth Triumphant" by George Gibbs, and 
they will use an all-star cast including little 
Virginia A. Corbin, the child star. 

The picture making expedition sent to 
South America by the Northern California 
Photo Play Company has made three com- 
edies on the boat going south. Chariot Mo- 
lina, matadore from Spain, even staged a 
bull fight. The trained bull belonging to the 
outfit travels in its own special crate on the 
deck. The party is reported as far as Guayu- 
quill, in Equador, South America. 



SAM "RftMCISCO 



m NAVDt>«U.\.% 




. 

m 

a 

_ m 

MA ™f s 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 35c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking; Permitted in Dress Circle 
and Logea 



San Francisco people are much interested 
in the first showing here this past week of 
"All The Brothers Were Valiant," done by 
Metro, as most of the picture was made here 
a couple of months ago. And the actual 
whaling was done out at sea from the whal- 
ing station at Half Moon Bay. 

Theodore Roberts, veteran star of the 
stage and screen, is in San Francisco for a 
few days. 

Eric Von Stroheim is still here and hard 
at work sixteen hours a day dictating to a 
stenographer the working continuity for "Mc- 
Teague," from Frank Norris' story of San 
Francisco thirty years ago. He expects to 
begin to shoot the picture February 15. 
Every week now brings additions to the 
Goldwyn forces in San Francisco operating 
for Von Stroheim's production of "Mc- 
Teague." "Last week's arrivals include Ray 
Moore, technical manager; Ben F. Rey- 
nolds, camera man; C. J. Rogers, property 
man; H. Trever-Kingsley, assistant techni- 
cal director, and L. Kolb, chief electrician 
of the whole Goldwyn lot. 

Mildred Harris and Louise Frazenda have 
been signed by Max Graf of the Graf Pro- 
duction Corporation for their forthcoming 
production of "The Fog." This will be the 
first time that Miss Harris will drop entirely 
the name of her late husband, Charlie Chap- 
lin. Paul Powell, one of the best directors 
in the business, will direct "The Fog"; John 
Arnold, who came to town a few days ago, 
will be head camera man, and work will 
begin on the picture at the Pacific studios 
within the week, as soon as Mr. Graf ar- 
rives from Los Angeles with the members of 
his all-star cast. 

Mark Strong, well known director, is in 
San Francisco for a short vacation, and to 
visit his mother. While here he is directing 
the screen tests being made at the Loew 
Warfield theater in connection with the Loew- 
Warfield-Bulletin-Graf screen type contest. 

A. H. Sebastian, of the Belasco Produc- 
tions, returned to New York last Sunday to 
help in the distribution of "Eyes of Love," 
their first picture. As soon as some of the 
details are out of the way, he and Edward 
Belasco will decide on which of several 
stories under consideration they will use for 
their next picture. 

Sucker Race Intact 

In Barnum's time there was a sucker born 
every minute, and from the number of used 
cars sold every day we would say there's 
been no race suicide. — The Vivifier. 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUHJHNG 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Plione Kearny 391 San Francisco 



Too Late 

Hotel Guest — Is there water in my room? 
Manager — There was, but I had the roof 
fixed not an hour ago. — Exchange. 



Besides two lenses 



In :i frame or eyeglass mounting' we 

sctonl Ific sen Ice bach of these 

— our skill in adjusting them to lit you 
correctly and the experience of our optical 
mechanics In producing them, our lenses 
are of the highest quality, accurately com- 
puted, true to focus, faultlessly ground 
and rigidly inspected. 

W. D. Fennimore A. R. Fennimora 

J. W. Davis 



♦ 




San Francisco - 181 PoBt, 2508 Mission Sts. 
Berkeley ... - 2106 Shattuck Avenue 
Oakland ------ 1221 Broadway 



Few People Take Proper Care of Their Teeth 

.Some think that a vigorous brushing: once 
or twice a day is taking- very good care 
of them. Brushing is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your 
teetli which only a competent dentist can 
take care of. Have your teetli examined. 
They may not be as sound as you imagine. 
A toothache means trouble ; do not wait 
for t lie ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There lire gum troubles that will destroy 
leeth faster than decay. Are your teeth 
sore? Do your gums bleed? Call in today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My 
nerve blocking system blocks off all nerves 
and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL. DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Garfield 835 

SPECIALISTS — Kxtraetlons; Crowns: 
Self I lemming HrldeeN ; Porcelain Work 
and KnofleHN Plates. 



— ANNUAL MEETING — 
THE JOSHUA HKXDY IRON WORKS 

The regular annual meeting of the stock- 
holders of The Joshua Hendy Iron Works 
will he held at the office of the Corpora- 
lion. Xo. 75 Fremont Street, San Fran- 
ClBCO, California, on Tuesday, the 13th day 
of February, 1H2.T. at the hour of 10 
o'clock a. m., for the purpose of electing 
a Board of Directors to serve for the en- 
suing year, and the transaction of such 
other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

('HAS. C. GARDNER, Secretary. 

Office, "5 Fremont Street, San Francisco, 
Cal. 



Quality 1866—56 Years— 1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Burllng-ame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodalde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 230 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Francineo Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 10, 1923 




PLyEASURE/S WAND 



"Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore 



Irene, Dance Queen, at Orpheum 

"Steps and Styles" is the title of Irene 
Castle's act, the great big beautiful act in 
which she shows us a thing or two in the 
way of artistic dancing and Paris fashions. 
She is an actress, this slip of a slender, grace- 
ful girl, and a highly intelligent one, with 
a personality and a temperament that set her 
quite apart. You would not think she'd 
care to appear in vaudeville exhibiting frocks 
and doing dance-steps, would you? Well, 
let me tell you this: When Irene Castle 
does that, or anything else, she puts the 
stamp of class upon it, and it becomes a 
work of art straightway. She loves pretty 
clothes, and she understands them and wears 
them wonderfully, and she loves to dance — 
how she loves it, and how she does it! I 
always like to think of her in an early film 
I once saw her and Vernon Castle in; it 
tells the story of their life together, as they 
sit with their big dog before the fire and 
reminisce and the scenes pass on the screen. 
But that is another story, and perhaps not 
quite in good taste to mention it; only, they 
did seem so perfectly mated, those two! 

Bernard Bolden's dogs appear and the ex- 
odus is observed of those members of the 
Jack London Club who do not approve of 
animal acts and show their desire to put an 
end to this form of cruelty to animals by 
leaving any performance while such an act 
is being presented, and returning quietly to 
their seats when it is over. 

"Hard Boiled Hampton" with Harry Hol- 
man, Violet Halliday and Florence Crowley 
is an excellent bit of comedy. 



California 

It took Peter B. Kyne to show us how 
really clever Jack Holt is. In "Making a 
Man" the character of the hero is the op- 
portunity that Mr. Holt has of making the 
world aware of the fact. The story of the 
big duck in the puddle (the young westerner 
of wealth and position in his own small 
area) and the small fish in the ocean (same 
chap suddenly chucked into New York City) 
is rich in good, wholesome, enjoyable narra- 
tive. Nothing very elevated or highbrowish 
about Kyne, but he tells a good story in a 
warm manner that everyone likes. Eva No- 
vak is also well cast, and Clarence Burton 
has a typical Burton part, while J. P. Lock- 
ney and Bert Woodruff are strong factors in 
the success of the piece. Ben Black intro- 
duces this week into his musical program 
scenes from Uncle Tom's Cabin. What next? 



Travers' "Salon Intimes" 

Just when the critic is about to turn to 
Coue for help, Reginald Travers steps in and 
saves him from this reaction. He has insti- 
tuted a charming novelty in the dramatic 




SMablt Normand in "Suzanna. 



situation, and the Colonial ballroom of the 
St. Francis is the scene of his beautiful idea, 
the Salon Intime, where artistic scenery, ex- 
quisite music, admirable entertainment and 
an atmosphere of rare culture prevail. This 
week the Spanish dancer, Estrellita, is the 
piece de resistance. A traveler, casting about 
him for an evening de luxe, would find it 
under his hotel roof and never realize he is 
7000 miles from Paris. 



Granada 

"A Front Page Story" is excellent Main 
street materia] for the screen. Arthur Good- 
rich, the author, has made an earnest at- 
tempt to present a human-interest drama, and 
as this is the kind of interest that most 
strongly appeals to human audiences, his 
success is pronounced. The story of the 
American small city is well told, and the 
enmity between its mayor and its editor is 
the hook on which hangs the preachment 



about co-operation versus opposition. Ed- 
ward Horton, upon whom falls the respon- 
sible role of Mister Fixit, does some excel- 
lent acting, and Edith Roberts as the edi- 
tor's daughter, gives the romantic touch to 
the drama. "Casey Jones Junior" is the 
comedy of the week, with Lige Conley to 
make it amusing. Paul Ash and his expon- 
ents of fatuous futility have an elaborate 
program that one can easily manage to miss 
by consulting the time schedule. Wallace 
at the organ is more fortunate in his selec- 
tions this week, and his playing when he 
has suitable compositions for the big instru- 
ment is indeed enjoyable. The news film is 
uncommonly interesting. 



Strand 

"Suzanna" is a picture of California days 
when the Spaniards ruled the land, and 
photographically it is one of the most ef- 
fective plays ever screened. The reproduc- 



February 10, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



tion of old times, old costumes and old build- 
ings has been accomplished with consummate 
skill. The casting of the heroine — well, not 
so good. Mabel Normand will never be a 
high-born senorita, no matter how hard she 
tries. The type is as remote from Mabel as 
the stars are from the earth. The other char- 
acters are fairly well presented and the story 
told is replete with interest. 

The period in which the play is placed 
is one of the most fascinating in all of 
California's history, and Mack Sennett has 
utilized all of its picturesque and romantic 
phases to make his beautiful picture. A 
plot full of Spanish fire and dashing adven- 
ture is unrolled in the wonderful surround- 
ings of old California, and we are carried 
wholly back to the days when maids were 
fair and men were bold. A breath-taking 
scene is that at the altar when Suzanna's 
true lover arrives and snatches her away 
from the man who is about to be declared 
her husband. "Suzanna" is one of the most 
pronounced successes ever seen at the Strand 
and patrons of the theater are showing their 
appreciation, thousands and thousands of 
them. 



Portola 

"One Exciting-Night." O-o-o-gosh-yes ! The 
temperamental chords in the human mech- 
anism that delightedly respond to fictitious 
fear are set going at the Portola this week, 
and for an hour life is just one terrific thrill 
after another. D. W. Griffith's cleverly con- 
structed mystery play is full of startling sit- 
uations and shivery suspense; the excitement 
is kept at boiling point and an occasional 
laugh is introduced to relieve the strain. 
Isn't it funny the way we love to torment 
our emotions with this kind of thing? Our 
conscious mind knows all the time that it s 
make-believe, and lets the childish subcon- 
scious part of us revel in the maze of mys- 
tery and impending dangers. The play is 
the kind that is kept going by its own mo- 
mentum, and not too much is exacted of 
' the people impersonating its characters. The 
cast, however, is entirely satisfactory, con- 
stituted of Carol Dempster and Henry Hull, 
and such excellent support as Porter Strong, 
Grace Griswold, Morgan Wallace. Margaret 
Dale and Frank Sheridan. Ormay's orchestra 
is a valuable acquisition to the Portola en- 
tertainment. Let us humbly hope that his 
popularity will not push him into such prom- 
inence that he will want to monopolize half 
the program with aimless antics outside his 
sphere. This has happened to other orchestra 
leaders, as we know to our sorrow. 



street theater the center of attraction this 
week. As Pancho Lopez, the dare-devil 
Mexican bandit and brave bad man, Hol- 
brook Blinn gives a performance rich in its 
dramatic achievement, beginning with his 
startling entrance just before the fall of the 
first curtain when the act had begun to 
drag a bit. The subtlety of his acting, the 
rare quality of his voice, the elusive trick of 
his humor, all go to make this actor the pop- 
ular person that he is, not only in his own 
San Francisco, but very far-afield in the big 
world. Thomas Wilkes has surrounded the 
visiting star with a company of such ex- 
cellence that each must have a word. Jer- 
ome Sheldon, a sturdy, straight-limbed, man- 
ly young chap, plays Gilbert Jones, the friend 
of the "Bad Man"; Charles Sellon is Henry 
Smith, an uncle, who is » querulous invalid 
dashing around in a wheel-chair and com- 
plicating every situation hopelessly; Nana 
Bryant has the role of Lucia Pell, the hero- 
ine; Charles Vogan is her husband, the un- 
ctuous millionaire villain; Red Giddings, a 
picturesque cow puncher, is admirably done 
by Brady Kline, who would be a fine actor 
if he only knew how to deliver his lines; 
Norman Feusier as Jasper Hardy, holder of 
the inevitable mortgage, and Hope Drown, 
his flappery daughter, uphold Alcazar stand- 
ards, and half a dozen other parts of Mexi- 
cans and rangers and soldiers are well taken. 

Sequoia Little Theater 

The Sequoia Little Theater is to open its 
new Russian-Scandinavian bill of three one- 
act plays early in March. "Champagne" is 
a tragic play of the lower classes by Isaac 
Joeb Peretz, one of the great Yiddish writers. 
The play which has been translated by Etta 
Block, a San Francisco woman, is very much 
in the style of Tolstoy and Gorky. "Bliss." 
by Anton Tchekoff, is a short comedy, hardly 
more than an exciting moment in the home of 
a Russian family. 

Strindberg's "The Outlaw," which is the 
third play on the bill, is a masterfully writ- 
ten Viking tale of a conqueror's battle with 
his own conscience. 



Alcazar 

Holbrook Blinn has introduced a tremend- 
ous impetus into our mid-winter dramatic 
season. New York took a year to see his 
play. "The Bad Man," and San Francisco 
is trying to see it in a week, which means 
a surging movement toward the box-office of 
the Alcazar. Mr. Blinn has a good play, a 
good star and a good supporting company, 
and that combination is making the O'Farrell 



CLUB ENTERTAINMENT 

The Vittoria Colonna Club, Bank of Italy 
building. Market and Powell streets, will af- 
ford its members a novel entertainment in 
having Mrs. Mary Lovel, M. A., who recited 
and lectured before the king of England, the 
presidents and cabinets of France and South 
America, the Bey of Tunis, etc., give a talk 
on graphology from a psychological angle 
at their meeting Saturday afternoon. Feb- 
ruary 10. Signatures of Michael Angelo, 
Raphael, Verdi, Garibaldi and other great 
Italians, as well as those of the Prince of 
Wales, Lloyd George, Margot Asquith, Presi- 
dent Harding, Maeterlinck and Camille Le- 
blanc, etc., will be shown on charts and an- 
alyzed. 



Efrem Zimbalist at Auditorium 

For the fifth and last popular concert of 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, to 
take place at the Exposition auditorium on 
Saturday evening. March 3, Efrem Zim- 
balist will be the guest artist. 

Gifted technically beyond most men and 
the possessor of a tone that is rarely beauti- 
ful. Zimbalist will be heard at his best in 
the Mendelssohn Concerto, with Conductor 
Alfred Hertz and his orchestra, as well as 
in Saint-Saens' Havanaise and the Ysaye ar- 
rangement of the Valse Caprice, by Saint- 
Saens. The final program, which is now in 
course of preparation, will be one worthy to 
close such a successful season as has been 
given under the direction of the auditonum 
committee of the board of supervisors. The 
price of seats will remain at the customary 
low figures and reservations may now be 
made at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s. 



SHAKESPEARE AT THE FAIRMONT 

In accordance with its plan to present 
to its members exclusive attractions, the Uni- 
versity Fine Arts Society will present on Wed- 
nesday afternoon, February 28, in the Gold 
ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel, the dis- 
tinguished actor Loriman Percival, who will 
give scenes from four Shakespearean dramas, 
assisted by Viola Percival. 

Miss Viola Percival, who assists him, is 
a gifted interpreter of the Shakespearean 
heroines. They will present scenes from 
"Romeo and Juliet," "The Merchant of 
Venice," "Macbeth" and the "Taming of 
the Shrew." Tea will be served after the 
performance with Mrs. William Hinckley 
Taylor presiding. The following patronesses 
will be at the honor table : Mesdames Walter 
S. Martin, Joseph D. Grant, Henry T. Scott, 
George Boyd, George H. Mendell Jr., Marcus 
Koshland, William M. Gwin, Charles Gove, 
Gaillard Stoney. I. N. Walter, Frank String- 
ham and Mark Requa. 



— Mrs. Daniel Lothrop of Boston, who has 
passed the last few months at the Clift hotel, 
is visiting at the Hotel Lyndon at Los Gatos, 
where she is at work on her new book. 



c JS[o r w on 
Exhibit 

Collection of valuable paintings by 
old and modern masters to be offered 

without reserve at 

Public oAuction 

Watch for 'Date of Sale 
Exhibit open from 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL ART 
EXPOSITION, ESC. 

517 Sutter St.. near Powell 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 10. 1923 



Fred Kahn 



Automotive Engineering in Its 
Entirety 

UNDER ONE ROOF 



General Repairing and Overhauling 

Pender and Ignition 

Radiator Work Welding 

Body Building Brazing 

Woodwork Blacksmithing 

Machine Work Electrical 

Carburetion 



Experts in Every Branch 
1507 SUTTER Telephone West 8296 

Authorized Elgin Parts and Service 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Tour investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 8419 

WHAT BEST SEKVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SEKVES US 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Hoars: Z till 4, and by Appointment 

Phone Sutter 1718 

REMOVED TO 

Howard Building, 209 Post Street 

Corner Grant Avenue, San Franclseo 



m 

The Automobile | 

J5llgHHIgKliagiBlgHlgBIHHIgaiiaHlgSIBHRIIg[gliap:Big 

The year of 1923 opens auspiciously for 
the automobile world, with the automobile 
show at the auditorium February 1 7. 



"Stutz-Srunts" 

If all American cars were Stutz's the world 
would be a happier place. It is a four-cyl- 
inder with sixteen valves, and if you should 
accidently put your foot on the accelerator 
pedal, something would seem to tell you that 
something was happening — very quickly. 
About seventy on the level and about forty- 
five up a one in twelve gradient represent the 
sort of thing the Stutz does, and I think it 
ought to be called "Stuntz" instead. Two 
features are particularly noticeable — right- 
hand control and double plug ignition. 



Black Point Cut-off Road Open 

The Black Point cut-off, connecting the 
Sausalito and San Rafael district with So- 
noma and Napa counties, is in excellent 
condition, according to the latest information 
received by the Richmond-San Rafael ferry. 

This route, which winds along the rim of 
the bay to the north of San Francisco, is 
a particularly pleasing one, skirting as it 
does the east bay cities on the one hand, and 
the resort and pleasure districts of Napa 
Valley and Jack London's "Valley of the 
Moon." 



Appointment of Sales Manager 

E. S. Jones has been appointed general 
sales manager of the Peerless Motor Com- 
pany. He has held managerial positions with 
some of the larger concerns in the automo- 
tive industry, and is one of the best-known 
men on automobile row. 



Brooke, Smith & French 

It is announced that the advertising ac- 
count of the Columbia Motors Company has 
just been placed with the advertising organi- 
zation of Brooke, Smith & French, Inc., of 
Detroit. Advertising plans will contemplate 
more extensive efforts than ever before, it 
is stated. The announcement is just made 
that Norman I. Taylor has been added to 
the organization. Taylor was formerly sales 
manager for the William N. Albee Company 
of the same city. 



Spring Breakage 

The cause of spring breakage is not en- 
tirely due to rough usage, lack of lubrica- 
tion or overloading, but in a great many 
cases to the spring clips working loose and 
being allowed to remain in that shape. The 
spring clips clamp the springs to the axles. 
They are made of high-grade materials to 
eliminate breakage, but still the nuts will 
work loose due to the excessive strains to 
which they are subjected. The clips should 
be inspected at least every 2000 miles. When 
the car is new it is advisable to tighten them 
after a few hundred miles. 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



MOTOBOIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO" 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
thenewHEXEON 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



1140 Geary Street 



Tel. Franklin 3685 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining; to Automobiles 

Oxy-Acetylene Welding- — Blacksmithing 

H. W. Culver M. Daberer E. Johnson 



LEE S. DOLSON CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Thone Kearny 4S86 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 

$1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Begrular 

French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Suits ['reused by Hand, Only — 
Sails Called for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing- and Cleaning; 
433 Mason St. Phone Franklin 2510 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



VISIT 



"The 
Catacombs" 

AT 

CYPRESS LAWN 
CEMETERY 

City Office: 

995 Market St. 

San Francisco 

PHONES: SUTTER 695 

DOUGLAS 4772 



Enroll Now in 



COSGROVE'S SCHOOL 



of 



Hair Dressing 

and 

Beauty Culture 

A course in the above makes you in- 
dependent. See 

MR. AND MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Kearny 2842 



St. Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 

to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manentlv located at Post and Powell Sts. 




Sunbeams 



!_:: r. it it Hi it, k _ii s :t it it .:: )t it it if it it it itH<-!t it it it; it ivX 

"Man," said the woman sternly, "you will 
wake up one morning and find 
world is being ruled by women." 

'Urn," sneered her husband, 
a woman, that." 

"What's just like a woman?" 
manded. 

"Why," he answered, deliberately, "to take 
advantage of a man when he sleeps." — 
Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. 



that the 

"Just like 

she de- 



"This is the Red Tape Bureau. We have 
200 employes." 

"I did not suppose you had work for so 
many." 

"Oh, we have an excellent system by 
means of which two men can do the work 
of one." — Louisville Courier-Journal. 



A golfer is a man who wears knee pants 
and seldom works after 2 p. m. in the sum- 
mer. Handicap : Scratch. 

A good golfer is a man who works at 
least two afternoons a week. Handicap: 10. 

An average golfer is a man who plays one 
afternoon but would like to play on others. 
Handicap: 20. 

A poor golfer is a fellow who plays on 
a public course when he can get on. Handi- 
cap: Anything. — Journal of the American 
Medical Association. 



"I hear you know every bootlegger in 
town." 

"Yep; I'm on sneaking terms will all of 
them." 



"Did you have any trouble learning to 
play the saxophone?" I asked a young man, 
who is proficient on that deadly instrument. 

"Yep," he replied, jazzily. "I got a load 
of birdshot in me, an' I lost two teeth. But 
it was easy after I took to practicin' in the 
woods." — Chicago Tribune. 



"When I was shipwrecked," said Captain 
Bowsprit, "I came across a tribe of wild 
women who had no tongues. 



"Good 



gracious 



!" cried the fair maiden. 



"How could they talk?" 

"They couldn't!" replied the old salt. 
"That's what made 'em wild!" — Pearson's 
Weekly. 



"What's the trouble?" 
"The car won't run. 
"What's the matter'" 
"Pa's been fixing it again." — Detroit Free 
Press. 

Stude — Is your professor satisfied with 
you? 

Frosh — He certainly must be. Today he 
said, "If all my pupils were like you. I would 
resign tomorrow!" That shows he thinks 
I know enough. — Kansas Sour Owl. 



HOTEL PLA7A 

Jan francisco 




DINING-ROOM 

Surprisingly good meals 
pleasingly served. Note 
t h e moderate prices : 

breakfast 25c to 75c 

Luncheon 65c 

Dinner $1.25 

(A la Carte Service also) 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Frunklin and Cough 
Telephone Park 271 



Mayerle's 




Expert Optical Service and 
Scientific Eye Examinations 

960 Market Street 

29 Years in San Francisco 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a little better than seems necessary" 
The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold in similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
37-45 First Street - - San Francisco 



Another Guaranteed Gardner 




We extend to the 1923 Gardner a one-year 
WRITTEN GUARANTEE 

— Because it is a Four, with the assured economy found 
in Fours alone. 

— Because the FIVE-BEARING CRANKSHAFT, a fea- 
ture found in no other four-cylinder motor, makes 
possible exceptional power and flexibility without 
the vibration that shortens the life of engines less 
well built. 

— Because it is a car of BALANCED VALUE, with a 
sturdy chassis; well-built, comfortable body; last- 
ing finish — a car made for long and trouble-free 
service. 

— Because it is the product of an organization that has 
served the public with dependable transportation for 
more than 4 years. 

Let us demonstrate the 1923 Gardner. The story is best 
told on the road 

J. W. FRAWLEY, Inc. 

1135 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Prospect 9160 



Cut Your Repair Bills 
50« 



o 



Four big cushions of air! On the Gruss 
Equipped Car, these absorb road bumps 
and shocks before they ever reach chassis 
or load. 

This protection from road vibration PRE- 
VENTS body squeaks — motor — trans- 
mission — differential trouble. It cuts re- 
pair bills in half. 

Gruss Air Springs are made for small cars 
and large. They cost less than you think. 

Ask us about them — Today. 









GRUSS AIR SPRING COMPANY fc 




865 Post St. 
San Francisco, Calif. 



GrussAfr Sprinqs m 




— -ask 



ask any expert 



Announcing the Completion 

of the Red Square 

Vacuum Cup Cord Line! 

We are positive no tire ever introduced was accepted 
with the whole-hearted enthusiasm that marked the an- 
nouncement of Pennsylvania Red Square Vacuum Cup 
Cord Tires in Ford sizes. 

The reasons are obvious: 

Cord tires which strictly maintain the Penn- 
sylvania standard of highest quality; 

Cord tires readily interchangeable with the 
thousands of fabric tires now in use; 

Cord tires selling at prices so moderate as to 
make the change from fabric to cord equip- 
ment a matter of actual economy. 

TANSEY- CROWE COMPANY 

1233 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Prospect 2000 



and Finally 

• 

Dash, comma, dash, 
comma and finally a 
period. Just a graphic 
illustration of a 
motor taking the big 
hill with cheap oil. 
It's all dash with 
Monogram. 

y/iiiftnn e\m 

■■I OILS AMD GBEASESIM 

WuHutiifnTO 

Jfo your Itlotor's Jife (Insurance. 



Established July 20, i,s.->ti 



AND 



PRICE 10 CENTS 
SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER $500PERYEAR 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1923 LOS ANGELES 



Two Refreshing Memories of the Exposition 



'The Fountain of Energy" 




C)5WEi£V h800,000 

Cups 

Were 

Served 



ms5^ 



brand 



coffee 



GEo - W.CASWELL CO' 
S AN FRANCISCO. U s A 




Not Sold 
Everywhere 




CASWELL'S 



Telephone 
Sutter 6654 



THE PACIFIC MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

Results for 1922— Fifty-Fifth Year 

New Life Insurance Issued (Paid for Basis) $ 84,634,328.00 

Total Life Insurance in Force, December 31, 1922 433,715,680.00 

Gain in Life Insurance in Force 43,559,637.00 

Total Cash Income 23,820,565.70 

Gain in Cash Income 2,839,638.74 

Total Paid Policyholders 8,633,724.23 

Grand Total Paid Policyholders since Organization 84,838,753.54 

Surplus, Assigned and Unassigned (Exclusive of Capital) 7,039,799.68 

Gain in Surplus 900,209.96 

Gain in Admitted Assets 8,157,567.32 

Gain in Reserves 6,600,554.42 

Premium Income, Accident Department 4,196,077.57 

Gain in Accident Premium Income 386,275.97 

Average Rate of Interest Earned 6.54% 

Death Rate, Actual to Expected 46.8% 



Balance Sheet— 

ASSETS 

Loans on real estate $31,585,699.58 

Amount of Loan does not exceed 
the statutory percentage of ap- 
praised value. 

Loans on Approved Collateral.. 4,044,008.26 

Loans to Policyholders 12,403,313.34 

In no case does amount of Loan 
exceed the reserve held by the 
Company. 

Bonds Owned 13,363,769.13 

Real Estate Owned 6,940,363.05 

Including Home Office Building 

Interest Due and Accrued 1,028,502.35 

Outstanding and Deferred Premiums — 
Life Department 1,673,779.68 

Accident Department 735,969.13 

Net Amount, Reserve Charged in 
Liabilities 

Cash on Hand 1,518,070.65 

Including $1,451,040.57 of De- 
posits drawing Interest. 

Other Assets _ 63,343.31 

TOTAL ADMITTED 

ASSETS $73,356,818.48 



-December 31, 1922 

LIABILITIES 
Reserves on Policies $62,264,281.17 

Claims in Process of Adjustment 1,220,715.00 

Premiums and Interest Paid in 
Advance 337,408.22 

Reserved for Taxes Payable 1923 492,500.00 

All Other Liabilities 502,114.41 

Including $193,73S.94 for 
Agents' Commissions in Accident 
Department. 



Total Liabilities $64,817,018.80 

Capital Stock $ 1,500,000,00 

Surplus Set Aside for Future 

Dividends to Policyholders 4,711,498.70 

Surplus Unassigned 2,328,300.98 



TOTAL $73,356,818.48 



TEN YEARS' GROWTH 





Cash 


Admitted 


•Total 


tLife 


Accident 


Paid Policv 




Income 


Assets 


Surplus 


Insurance 


Premiums 


holders 


1912 . . . 


$ 8,199,097 


$26,243,006 


$2,915,116 


$133,309,014 


$1,739,392 


$2,965,293 


1914 . . . 


9,506,116 


32,604,612 


3,989,846 


154,525,447 


1,876,579 


3,690,792 


1916 . . . 


10,403,191 


38,727,197 


4,932,025 


171,913,618 


2,012,257 


4,344,645 


1918 .. . 


12,149,531 


45,432,696 


5,039,329 


208,647,520 


2,042,122 


5,133,303 


1920 . . . 


18,840,800 


58,294,497 


6,958,112 


350,408,951 


3,326,492 


5,358,054 


1921 . . . 


20,980,927 


65,199,251 


7,639,590 


390,156,043 


3,809,802 


7,612,662 


1922 . . . 


23,820,566 


73,356,818 


8,539,800 


433,715,680 


4,196,078 


8,633,724 



•Includes Surplus Assigned and Unassigned and Capital Stock. tPaid Business. 



San Francisco Branch Office 



155 Montgomery Street 



ARTHUR C. PARSONS, Manager 






ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1866 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. CII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1923 



No. 7 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets. 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif.. Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



— The "Padre of the Rains" is a great prophet. 

— The only way to stop war is to put it up to popular vote, 
and recruit the man on the spot when he votes for it. 

— Did you know that there is a whipping post at Eton College? 
The inimitable Dickens could still find material in England to work 
upon as regards her education system. 

* * * 

— The granting of the franchise for the Coyote Point bridge means 
more for the booming and building up of the peninsula than any- 
thing that has ever happened in its history. 

— Does San Francisco appreciate art? That question could be 
answered any day during the recent exhibit at the Bohemian club when 
the rooms were so crowded that one could barely get a view of 

the pictures. 

* * * 

— It seems only reasonable for all the taxis operating in San 
Francisco to be required by law to carry meters; otherwise the 
passengers can be held up for any amount the driver sees fit to 

impose. 

* * * 

— Someone in the Chronicle's "Safety Valve" wants to know if 
the lady presiding over Union Square monument cannot have a 
bath, now that Supervisor Mary Morgan has promised us a clean-up 
day. Personally we should like to see the top of the palms in the 
courts of some of our buildings washed off a little, too. 

* * * 

— A new taxicab law, proposed by the board of supervisors, 
whereby all taxi drivers must have had six months' experience in 
San Francisco, before receiving their licenses, is ridiculous on the 
face of it. Does it not stand to reason that anyone in their senses 
would prefer a driver who could show a New York or London or 
Chicago license to one who had only driven in San Francisco? San 
Francisco's traffic laws make it comparatively easy for a driver com- 
pared, for instance, to Los Angeles' traffic laws. "You don't know 
what a jam is in San Francisco." said a friend who has lately been 
in the south. "Why. I have seen jams in those narrow streets that 
would make you wonder how on earth the drivers could ever extri- 
cate themselves!" 



— "Are our troops at Cologne the advance guard of the British 
expeditionary force in the next great war, and if so, on which side 
do we propose that they shall fight?" asks the British "Nation." 

— Passing through Union Square in the wee sma' hours, a party 
of newspaper reporters came upon a man and girl very much en- 
grossed in each other on one of the benches. It was raining and 
cold, and the two, though smartly dressed, apparently were oblivious 
to the inclement weather. Young love at 3 o'clock in the morning! 

— Bootlegging has monopolized the attention of the public to 
such an extent that other subjects for investigation, generally in- 
stigated by women's clubs, seem to be crowded out. How about 
the erstwhile Satanic dance halls, ladies? Will we need another 
Howard street crime to awaken interest in these "dens of vice"? 

— Harry Lauder says that he prefers to play before American 
audiences now because they are more quiet and attentive, and 
they create an atmosphere which draws the best from the actor. 
Many European "knockers" have found fault with our audiences 
because of our restlessness, shuffling of feet, etc. Possibly Lauder 
is right; this is the only country at present in a half-way settled 
condition, which, of course, reflects in turn upon the people's ac- 
tions. 

* * * 

— Wm. A. Brady, theatrical producer, is nabbed by the New York 
police for violating the state Sunday theater closing law. Gradu- 
ally this old "land of the free" is reviving the Puritan measures to 
such an extent that the time may come when a man will be ar- 
rested for kissing his wife on the Sabbath, as in the "good old days." 
Well, that won't be such a hardship, when there are other men's 
wives to kiss! 

— The Germans appear to be, by boycott and other bloodless 
methods, contending with the French invasion, in an utterly un- 
Germanic manner, while France is planning new seizures of terri- 
tory. We have a suspicion, though, that Germany has something 
up her sleeve, which in time she will spring on her ancient enemy. 
This resistence is too civilized, too mild, too — gentlemanly, we might 
say, for the savage Huns. It doesn't ring true; something is going 
to break — soon! 

¥ * * 

— One would suppose that federal prohibition officers would be 
chosen from among a rather decent class of men — representing as 
they do the dignity of the United States government and a reform 
cause at the same time — but recent cases, such as the one in Los 
Angeles, where the prohibition agent kicked a woman and said he 
would kick her again, would seem to prove that some of these 
agents are recruited from gangs of plug uglies. No possible provo- 
cation we can imagine should excuse a man for kicking a woman. 
We cannot think that even the most fanatical of Volsteaders would 
advocate such measures becoming general. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 17, 1923 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




You can bet on a seeding time of vast pro- 
A Crop of New Laws portion whenever a legislature meets and all 

kinds of crops may be expected from the seed- 
ing. The present meeting of the wise men of California at Sacra- 
mento is no exception to the rule. Every legislator has his little bill, 
embodying his little idea, which he wishes to translate into a law 
for the future bedevilment of his constituency and that of his col- 
leagues. 

Everybody knows that if enforced we have statutes covering about 
every known sin and many that have become unknown since the 
laws were passed to curb them. When everybody knows this it 
would be a very strange thing to argue that any legislator did not 
know the facts, too. And yet every little legislator has a little idea 
and the trouble with these ideas is that they are so very little, 
probably small would be a better word to use in this connection. 



If we must have new laws let us have 
If We Must Have New Laws some that are made necessary through 

some obvious need. Because a man is 
so unfortunate as to have been elected a legislator is no reason 
why he immediately should give birth to some new and needless 
statute. His fellow citizens will get on just as well without such an 
infliction and a monument is likely to be raised by a grateful popu- 
lace to the man who goes to Sacramento and sits tight and never 
opens his mouth in favor of some new law during the whole ses- 
sion. This is likely to happen, should such a man exist with such 
exceptional good sense. But the animile isn't born yet. 



Out of the restlessness of his nature, and because some 
For Instance labor unionite constituency has so dictated, Mr. Horn- 
blower is to the fore with a bill which purports to 
limit the hours of work in a pharmacy, drug store, or store, to nine 
hours, making it an offense that is finable and for which one may, 
in addition, be imprisoned. Limiting the hours of work in the pro- 
fession of a prescription compounder is one of the very worst things 
that could have been conceived by any law-maker. Here it is a 
case of a profession, which should be just as devoted in its min- 
istration to the public wants as any doctor, and here the law pro- 
poses to step in and prevent a prescription clerk working more than 
nine hours, on pain of fine and imprisonment. And the matter of 
enforcement of the law, if passed, is left to the commissioner of 
labor and statistics. Any law, so obviously designed to strengthen 
the position assumed by labor unions, that they have a right to 
dictate what hours shall be given to labor by any craft or profes- 
sion, should be frowned down by the legislature. 



Hungry San Francisco politicians are again 
Hungry San Franciscan to the front with a design to grab the con- 
trol of the waterfront through aid given 
them by the legislators. Here is the array of talent behind the bill 
making this grab possible: Senators McDonald, Burnett, Gray, Ca- 
nepa, Crowley and Godsil. Isn't that wonderful barrage? Many 
times before this attempt has been made, in one or another form. 
The very best argument to advance against granting to the hungry 
politicians a chance to overturn the good work of the Board of 
Harbor Commissioners is the fact that the work carried on by the 
board cannot be improved upon or, if anyone sees a way to improve 
any of the many activities in which this board is engaged, any good 
suggestion will be accepted by the board and considered and 
adopted. There is not one good reason to be advanced by those 



advocating the change from the state to the city except that San 
Francisco politicians would be benefited by an increase in the loaves 
and fishes at their political disposition and the vast increase in the 
opportunity for graft coming to them as a result. 



No one, as far as heard from, has any right 
No Right to Complain whatever to complain as to the management 

of the harbor by the state of California. In 
fact, instead of trying to pass a law which would, if enacted, be a 
step backward for the city and the state, it would be far better 
if the legislature were asked to consider an act which would place 
the harbors of the state, wherever situated, under the complete con- 
trol of the state harbor board. That would mean good manage- 
ment and a great improvement in service to the citizens of the 
whole state and of every harbor. Local politicians would, of course, 
be all against any such move and would block, or try to block, 
any attempt at any measure becoming a law that is so absolutely 
sane and safe. 



The San Francisco Bureau of Govern- 
A Solution of mental Research, a non-partisan citi- 

San Francisco's Problems zen's agency which studies public busi- 
ness and works for efficiency of muni- 
cipal affairs, has made a study of San Francisco's street car needs 
and advocates as a solution of San Francisco's street car transpor- 
tation trouble the immediate purchase by the city of the Market 
Street Railway Company, the purchase price to be paid for out 
of the earnings of the properties themselves. 

The bureau says: 

"With a single transportation system owned by the city, the char- 
ter franchise restrictions, which have prevented the building and 
operating of extensions by the privately owned company, would 
automatically cease. Universal transfers, producing a tremendous 
saving to the users of both systems, could be provided for. Needed 
extensions could be planned in the most economical manner instead 
of, as at present, trying to stretch Municipal railway trackage into 
territory that lies much closer to existing lines of the privately 
owned company, and the solution of downtown congestion would 
be materially expedited. 

"To those opposed to municipal ownership, the point should be 
emphasized that the acquisition by the city of the privately owned 
system is not so much a matter of public vs. private ownership, 
but the paramount point is rather one of adopting the only feasible 
method of securing transportation. The restrictions and disadvan- 
tages of operation and growth surrounding the private company, 
which have been set up by the people and probably will not be 
removed by the people so long as the transportation system remains 
in private hands, is the factor in fixing public ownership as the 
sole practical solution." 



Dust respirators for protecting workmen from inhaling injurious 
dusts in mines or other dusty places are undergoing tests at the 
Pittsburgh, Pa., experiment station of the Bureau of Mines to de- 
termine their relative merits. Silica rock dust suspended in the air 
and tobacco smoke are being used as test mediums. Various fabrics 
have been compared for their filtering qualities, the best so far 
having been cotton flannel, and dense wool felt. Filter paper of 
close texture also tested high against very fine particles. A dust 
respirator of superior efficiency and comfortable to wear may be 
designed from results of this investigation. 



February 17. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




A FEBRUARY BOOK CHAT 

ByKEM 

THE 1923 books are putting in their appearance in their new 
spring jackets. The young girls and the more mature readers 
who have kept their girlish enthusiam are rejoicing over the fol- 
lowing: 

BLACK OXEN, by Gertrude Atherton, cited by many readers as 
her best novel. It is one that will be "widely discussed everywhere," 
as Charles Hanson Towne declares in the Bookman, "and will cre- 
ate a new place for Mrs. Atherton." Another one of her admirers 
declares it "the most important study of feminine psychology of 
recent years. The theme one that has a never unending interest 
especially to women who have already learned so much in this 
generation about retaining their 'magnificent and eternal youth'." 
Pub. by Boni & Liverwright. Price $2. 

■I" *p *Jt* *r 

JOSEPH GREER & HIS DAUGHTER, by Henry Kitchell Web- 
ster. 

A recent literary journal tells us Mr. Webster lives down town 
in the busiest corner of Chicago purposely to absorb "atmosphere," 
and this, his latest novel, shows that it has been successfully ab- 
sorbed. 

It is a modern American story already rated as his finest, and 
stands out among the many business stories of the day. 

It is a curious revealing book of the conventional money-men 
and their attitude towards Joseph Greer, a piratical sort of adven- 
turer, with practical vision to transform waste products into money, 
which is promptly absorbed by the "stall-fed" money kings who 
out-class him in self control and ability, to stand in solid forma- 
tion against any invader of their herd. 

Every character is drawn with exquisite skill from Joseph Greer, 
whose dynamic personality attracts romance in hit'n'miss fashion, 
perpetually about him, to Violet of the many conflicting moods — 
lovely clothes, and richly drawn background, and about whom many 
men felt as Henry Craven did, "That he wasn't at all sure he liked 
Violet, but it was true that he had never quite got over being in 
love with her." 

But best of all, the business women will appreciate the "valiant" 
Jennie, who belonged temperamentally to the adventure class — but 
of whom no conceivable circumstance could make an enrolled mem- 
ber — for she had turned all her woman's heart and brain into the 
service of Joseph Greer — or as she expressed it, "had always been 
married to him in an office sort of way" They will appreciate her 
summing up of love, viz., — "that a life without it might be a better 
thing than one in which it is unsuccessfully mixed"; and also more 
than appreciate her attitude to the "attraction between her and 
Joe ... a genuine danger, but being wise enough to recognize 
its existence, knowing that this reef was there, she had been able 
for seven years to steer a successful course where a less open-eyed 
pilot might easily have suffered ship-wreck." Pub. by Bobbs-Mer- 
rill Co. $2. 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 



at 
239 Post Street 



PAUL ELDER'S 



San Francisco 



Visit the 

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ROUND TRIP EXCURSIONS 
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Acaponeta 

San Bias 

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Daily Feb. 14 to March 31 
Final return limit six months 

Stopovers allowed at all points 
within limit 

Our agents will gladly give you detailed information. 

Southern Pacific Lines 




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or Phone Sutter 4000 



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of 100 Mon 



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California Manager 

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1026 Market St., San Francisco 



""I 



Fill out and mail this blank to Mr. 
Hill today for further information. 
No obligation. 

Name 

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Address 

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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 17, 1923 



:- it k as T: r:-).; , 

13 



HiisBBSsiHi!BSBSBHBSBBEHBBS@BBBHSBBBBHBHBBBi3BBS8SHra^ 

The Ranch of the Witch's Head s 



ussaspjJssiissasS; 



bh By ELEANORE F. ROSS 

IS B 

CHAPER IV. squelched by Mama, who said indignantly: "You children will laugh 

_ ,. at my funeral, I believe!" Even the driver cast a glance of scorn 

We Cross the Rubicon at ^ and muttered . » A mighty c]ose snave> . win say , •• 

f | ^HE boys had been in the habit of spending most of their time A f evv m jl e s onward, and at last we were driving along our par- 
the warm and cozy station, under the friendly eyes of the ticular fence, — much in need of repair. A turn in the road and 

into our view came a little old weather-beaten house, on a small 
cleared eminence near the highway. Down the slope from this, a 
cluster of out-buildings and back of these, thick woods of oak and 
pine. There was a small orchard of gnarled and twisted apple and 
almond trees, with here and there a pinched and unhealthy look- 
ing blossom. Already on the few acres that had been cleared, the 
chaparral was stealthily encroaching; everything was neglected and 
falling into decay, and there was an atmosphere of many lonely 
years through which the little cluster of buildings had lived and 
endured. 

Our carriage stopped before the wire gate, and right behind us 
the furniture van came to a standstill. Maggie, with a muttered "The 



station master, when Maggie wasn't with them. They enlivened the 
dull moments by playing marbles, watching the passing trains, and 
talking with whoever happened to come along. 

That memorable day Maggie had sought them in their accustomed 
haunt and not finding them, had searched the little town in vain. 
She had routed out many slothful townsmen, and had sent them in 
all directions, before breaking the news to the family. 

It was an anxious afternoon, but evening brought great joy, in 
the shape of the boys themselves, Charlie tired and sick, Percie 
almost as energetic as ever. I can see his round, merry eyes now, 
as Charlie told of the adventures of their tramp to the ranch and 
back, a journey of fourteen miles! 

Of course, they had had "lifts" along the road, but certainly 
it had been a feat to cross the river on the top board of the fence, 
with only a wire to hold themselves steady with! Coming back, 
they had crossed in a wagon. They had seen the ranch, and that 
is what they had determined to do. I suppose, after our weary days 
of "durance vile" in Rockdale, their childish minds questioned if 
the ranch really existed! 

The <-louds had lifted, the rain had ceased, and our little cavalcade 
w=>- on its way to the ranch. Mama, Charlie, and we girls rode in 
a double-seated "rig" with two horses; Maggie, Luke and Percie 
perched high on the seat of the furniture van, followed in our 
wake. "Grover," the dog, romped behind. 

' regret to say that our exit from the little town of Rockdale 
was not an especially triumphant nor even dignified one. All the 
townspeople came to their front gates or windows to see us off. Our 
little landlady, after a last admonishment to remember that "hard 
work never killed no-one," went with much clicking of her false 
teeth back to her doorstep, where she waved energetically until 
we were out of sight. 

A group of women on the rim of the village, stared at us with 
popping eyes. "Who are them?" one asked a neighbor curiously. 
"They be them Lewises, going to ranch it about seven miles on 
the Folsom road," answered her friend. I can still hear the wild out- 
burst of laughter which followed this explanation. "Going ranch- 
ing! Them stylishers!" shrieked her cronies, and the high hills 
all about seemed to take up the echoes, and throw back the words 
mockingly, — "Them stylishers ! Ha I Ha ! Ha ! " 

The ride from the town to our destination is rather a vague 
memory to me. There was much exclaiming over the green hills, 
the masses of poppies, the clean, white, sandy road, the crossing 
of the small river. And always journeying along with us to our 
left, the long line of stately snow-capped Sierras. On our right, 
the rolling meadows melted into the blue, hazy Sacramento valley. 

I can remember our one stop on a little rise in the road, from 
which we looked back to the heavy furniture van, stalled in the 
rushing stream, with the horses struggling and straining, the driver 
cracking his whip and cursing, and Maggie clutching Percie to her 
breast, and (no doubt) swearing also. 

It was an anxious moment, but the horses pulled through, and 
Fannie and I, in our hysterical relief, burst out laughing, only to be 



us this 
charge. 



day!" clambered over the 



We girls looked around us, 



holy saints have mercy upon 
wheel and reached out for her 
rather dazed. 

"That's the barn, of course," I announced, "but where, Mama, 
is the house?" 

"That," answered Mama with great dignity, "is the house." 
(To be continued.) 



-There are I 75 different pieces in an average watch. 



: s'S'SS'S Ssaus8JaaSI«« »«J?5*M?«« l 




The Mother Goose 
Confections 

Here is Something c IS[ew! 

A confection made of California's most 
perfect fruits and berries, scientifically pro- 
cessed, chocolate-coated or "candied" in 
their own juices. 

The natural sugar of the fruits produces a 
PERFECT Candy. 

Dipped in chocolate perpetuates the nat- 
ural exquisite flavor and fragrance. 

wo Varieties, jc to $1.50 Each 

One pound box by mail postpaid, $1.00. 

Send a box to your eastern friends. 

Visit our Art Gallery of Mother Goose 
paintings by Chas. A. Holland, the world's 
famed artist. 

^Mother Cjoose Confection Co., Inc. 

1214 Market St., San Francisco 



iSM K 1 M'S; n'%% ) 






laanaa: 



February 17, 1923 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 





it it It it :: it it it it It It It t: v. it It It it It it It it it i; i; it it ic it It it it n it it :, e it it it It It it it it it it 



It I! It It It It It lilt it i: it It it It It it jii^g: 



The Automobile Show 



\Sjpf 



AN FRANCISCO'S Seventh Annual Automobile 
Show opens next Saturday night in the great muni- 
cipal auditorium. Every foot of display space has 
been sold long ago, and from reports emanating 
from the office of George Wahlgreen, show man- 
ager, it will be one of the finest and largest auto- 
mobile shows ever held in the west. The deco- 
rative scheme of the San Francisco show is ancient 
Chinese. This scheme is carried out through the whole building, 
which is heroic in size. Great Chinese warriors stand at attention 
in the big side rooms, and scenes from Oriental temples cover the 
walls of the main auditorium. Great urns, higher than a man, burn 
incense to the idols, which dot the dome. A huge canopy covers 
the ceiling, and great care has been taken in the illumination. 
Ward and Blohme, well known architects, have charge of the 



iriti it iti.it icntitiitjtuft; 



The San Francisco show now rates third among the great auto- 
mobile displays of the country. The first show of national scope 
is held in New York City early in January. Then comes the sec- 
ond national show in Chicago. These two national shows are held 
under the auspices of the National Automobile Chamber of Com- 
merce, which includes all the large manufacturers of the industry. 
The latest creations in motordom are always displayed there first. 

Then comes the Pacific Coast show in San Francisco. Most of 
the new cars are shipped from the Chicago show directly to San 
Francisco for exhibit here. 

Attendance records were shattered at the New York and Chicago 
shows. The same thing happened at the Oakland show last month. 
In New York and Chicago it was necessary to close the doors of 
the show building at 8 o'clock several nights during the week of 
display on account of the huge crowds. 




Phaeton, $27!>5, Sedan, $8640. i'.o.b. San Francisco 



decorations this year and have been working with Manager Wahl- 
green to get the huge canopies in place and to have the show ready 
for the opening. 

The decorations of the main hall consist of temple walls and 
portals of ivory tint, highly colored with gold and the various bright 
colors so much affected by the Orientals. The walls are surmounted 
and surrounded by brilliantly colored and highly complicated design 
in Oriental draperies. The Buddist idols in the shrines are intended 
to bring to the mind the elements entering into the production of 
the motor vehicle — fire, water, earth and air. 

Buddist lore through legendary associations indicates that the 
ancient Chinese established four sacred mountains for the purpose 
of fixing a physical pillar at each of the four points of the com- 
pass. 

The cars, trucks and accessories at the show will be greater in 
number and more varied than ever before. The whole main floor 
will be given over to the display of new automobiles. Trucks, spe- 
cial tops and many new cars will be displayed in the basement. The 
second floor will house a huge accessory exhibit ranging from spark 
plugs to camping equipment. 

There will be many new cars, never before exhibited at an auto- 
mobile show. Several cars have been shipped from the national 
exhibit at Chicago by express to be here in time for the San Fran- 
cisco show. These cars were shipped over the protests of other 
large cities where shows are being held. 



It is expected that the attendance records of the San Francisco 
show will eclipse any of the past six displays. There is more inter- 
est in automobiles this year than ever before and it stands to 
reason that there should be. 

There is an automobile to every four persons in this state now 
and last year one person in every twenty-two throughout California 
bought a new car, so when you talk about the motoring public 
you come pretty nearly meaning the whole public. 

The show starts Saturday night, the 1 7th, and runs eight days, 

closing the following Saturday night at 10:30. 

* * * * 

Forty-two million tires is the estimated demand of 1923, according 
to conservative estimates of the rubber industry in the United States. 
The prediction is based on two factors, the estimated production of 
automobiles and the consumption of gasoline in 1922. In ex- 
planation of the method of arriving at the 42,000,000 figure, it is 
recalled that the estimate based on similar factors for 1922 of 36,- 
000,000 tires tallies closely with figures gathered by the Rubber 
Association of America. 

* * * * 

In the tra.'n of the advances in prices of tires announced by the 
United States Rubber Company, the B. F. Goodrich & Co., and the 
Republic Rubber Company have increased their list quotations. The 
Goodrich advance and that of the Republic company was \2'/2 
per cent on both casings and tubs. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 17, 1923 




Gardner Phaeton, $1135. Sedan, $1585, f.o.b. San Francisco, liooth Xo. -25 Auto Shim 



What's all this talk about synthetic faces? A Chicago woman 
claims that the synthetic spirits, which our enforcement of prohi- 
bition is driving down the throats of our young women, is making 
parchment of their faces. It may be so in Chicago. But we have 
not seen the unadulterated faces of our women for so long that we 
don't know. But speaking of faces, what is the matter with the 
men? The Town Crier was in an exclusive barber shop the other 



day and saw men with their faces covered with mud. He wondered 
why, so he waited until the barber had finished, then he wished 
that the mud had remained. To see a fat apoplectic man his face 
covered with mud, and a manicurist sitting patiently manicuring 
him, is a sight not to be seen elsewhere in the wide world. "Syn- 
thetic faces" sounds horrid, but there are worse faces here even 
than those in Chicago. 




Oldsmobile Xo. 4:5 Brougham, $1595. [Touring California Top, $i:?!»8 f.o.b. San Francisco 

A federal inspector was patiently quizzing one of ihe burley Nor- Two actors were waiting to see a certain well-known theatrical 

wegian mates on the Sierra, in the course of his investigation into manager, with a view to obtaining an engagement, and during the 

her collision with the Wilhelmina. "Where were you when the crash time they were boasting of their theatrical exploits. "Ah, my boy," 

came?" "In my bunk asleep." "Did you go up on deck?" "Well, said one, "when I played Hamlet the audience took fifteen minutes 

I got dressed first." "Yes, I did not suppose you went a la September to leave the theater." The other looked at him, "Oh," he inquired 

Morn." gently, "was he lame?" 




Hudson Touring, $1475. Sedan, $2005, f.o.b. Detroit 



February 17. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




Cleveland Chesterfield, $148;>. Cleveland Two-door Sedan Special, $1660, f.o.b. San Francisco 



A general in the American army was recalling one of the inci- 
dents of his life at a dinner one evening. "There is a lot of humor 
— real humor — to be found on battlefields," he said. "I remember 
a retreat which was really a rout. In this retreat the command- 
ing general, as he galloped along like the wind, turned to an aide- 
de-camp, who also was urging his horse to the limit, and asked, 'Who 
are our rear-guard?' The aide, without the slightest hesitation, re- 
plied, 'Those who have the worst horses, sir.' " 



The "antique" furnl'ture trade flourishes in the town of Dinan, 
France. Wonderful "ancient" Jacobean sideboards, chairs and spin- 
ning wheels may be purchased in profusion. The dealer makes 
and carves his furniture, copying the originals of many periods. 
Rain and sun impart the necessary semblance of antiquity to the 
pieces which stand outside the shop in all kinds of weather. 

Of the 530 men and one woman who are at present members of 
the House of Representatives and Senate, more than 300 are lawyers. 




Nash 6-CyIinder "Sport" 1023 Model, !(>1!>20. (.-Cylinder Four-door Coupe, $2SH5, f. o.b. San Francisco 



A certain famous magistrate was taking coffee in his club one 
summer evening when a fellow member remarked that hot coffee 
was not a good summer drink. "You should take cooling drinks, 
he advised. "Have you tried gin and ginger-beer?" "No," answered 
the magistrate dryly, "but I've tried a number of men who have.' 



The Soviet government, hesitating to wreck the statue of Alex- 
ander III, standing on a square in Petrograd, has caused the following 
legend to be hewn into its base : "Your father and your son were 
executed by the people. You have died peaceably, but to serve 
as a scarecrow." 




Jordan Com- Passenger Bine Hoy. $2485. completely equipped. Five Passenger Sedan, $2886, f.o.b. San Francisco 

Space No. 18 Auto Show 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 17, 1923 




'haeton, $1745. Model Xo. 55, Brougham Sedan, $2945, f.o.b. 



A new small car is being developed by the Cleveland Tractor 
Company, which is to be added to its line in due course. At pres- 
ent this is in more or less of a formative state, various plans for 
its introduction being under consideration. Those who know, say 
that the facility with which it can be produced, promises its abil- 
ity to compete in a substantial way in the class into which it is 
destined to fit. 



Due to the fact that many automobiles are injured by novices 
during the first 1000 miles of driving, a method has been devised 
of finishing the cylinder block, which has the effect of turning out 
a cylinder wall having the qualities of having been driven several 
thousand miles. The blocks are cast, seasoned, bored and reamed 
in the familiar manner, following which an operation is undertaken 
which finishes the walls so that they have a glazed surface. 




Studebaker Big Six 5-passcngei' Coupe, $2935. Big Six 4-passengcr Speedster, $2135, f.o.b. San Francisco 
Studebaker offers wide choice in three chassis designs in 15 body styles selling at San Francisco, freight and tax paid from 
$1190 fo $3155. The two eats shown here are the Studebaker Corporation's answer to the demand for both open and closed 
cars of ultra modern design. The other cars in the Studebaker line are loo well known to need description 



Now and again we get a bit put out with our city. The trade- 
union question with its interminable wranging and interference with 
business, the stupidity and worse of the city fathers, the niggling 
restlessness of our women folk, for ever poking their fingers into 
this and that, at times get on our nerves and make us think that 
the city of our love is more or less of a temperamental hussy. Then 
something happens to show her real sweetness and sincerity of 
heart and we lose our impatience and are just as much in love with 
her as ever. The last instance is the real warm-heartedness of the 



welcome to Holbrook Blinn, our old, esteemed actor. All sections 
of the city, no matter what their deep divergencies, have com- 
bined to make him feel that we remember old joys and are not 
ungrateful for long past delights. The lunch given him by the 
Down Town Association is a mark of appreciation, the heartiness 
of which is as deserved as it is unusual. In these acts we not only 
honor the recipient but we prove to the world again that San Fran- 
cisco is not killed in spirit by the hard struggle of the day, but 
that her heart is youthful and gallant and sweet. 




Marmon Seven Passenger Phaeton with Panorama Top, $3695. Collpei $43e5i r , 0-b . San Fl . am . isco s , )aoc Xo 4 .„ (h( , A|lt(( >.,,„„. 



February 17. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 




Mitchell Five Passenger Touring Car, l)e Luxe Gillig Top, $2060. Seven Passenger 



Luxe, $2290, i'.o.b. San Francisco 



The progress of Peerless in organization, car and factory improve- 
ment, sales, financial and general growth, since R. H. Collins and 
his associates assumed control a little more than a year ago is to- 
day one of the most widely discussed topics throughout the auto- 
motive industry. 

Collins took the helm at the Peerless factory on October 3, 1921. 
Immediately Peerless sales began to increase. Then with the new 
Peerless models in production, all previous records in every phase 



of production, shipping, sales and cash receipts for the twenty-two 
years of Peerless history, were promptly and repeatedly smashed. 

Interest in the new Peerless line was instantaneous and widespread, 
points out A. K. McLuney, president and general manager of the 
Pioneer Motor Company, local direct factory branch for Peerless. 
It has been difficult, as a result, McLuney states, for any distribu- 
tor or even any branch to keep a full line of models on hand, and 
to give reasonably prompt delivery on all models. 




Lincoln Seven Passenger Touring, $4165.72. Four Passenger Sedan, $5065, l.o.b. San Francisco 

Win. L. Hughson <'<>., Ford Coiner. 



One of the most striking phenomena of recent years is the 
social use which is being made of adolescent boys. This is apropos 
of the enrollment of 1500 boys of San Francisco as junior police- 
men, as part of the traffic division of the police department. We 
have nothing but praise for the movement and can see that it is 
likely to be very advantageous both to the boys and the commun- 
ity. Ever since Baden Powell so cleverly made use of that great 
reservoir of power which was going to waste, to the detriment of 



the boys themselves, we have seen more and more need for the co- 
operation of our adolescents. Only Europe can tell of the tremen- 
dous saving which the employment of boys to perform social and 
civic acts made possible all through the war. The story of the 
English boy scouts is a story of romantic bravery and hard work. 
The best of it is that the boys, unlike their elders, sometimes come 
through entirely for they have a fresh young faith and idealism 
which makes them impatient of anything but the best. 




Bssei Touring, $1385. Coach, $1345, f.o.li. San Francisco 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 17, 1923 




Buick 4-Cylinder Coupe, $1415; 6-Cjiincler Touring Sedan, $2210, f.o.b. San Francisco 



Mary and John, who had been married but a few years, were 
having domestic troubles. Things were going from bad to worse 
and they had decided to settle the matter in court. But Mary much 
desired a reconciliation. Looking out of the window, she noticed 
a pair of horses pulling a dump cart heavily loaded. She turned 
to her husband saying, "John, I wish we could pull together as 
those horses do." John replied, very meekly, "We could, Mary, if 
— we only had one tongue between us." 



A certain very old Irishman astonished a friend one day by an- 
nouncing that he was about to get married. "Married!" exclaimed 
his friend. "An ould man like you?" "Well, ye see," the old man 
explained, "it's just because I'm gettin' an ould bhoy now. 'Tis 
a foine thing, Pat, to have a wife near ye to close the eyes of ye 
whin ye come to the end." "Arrah, now, ye ould fule," exclaimed 
Pat, "don't be so foolish. What do ye know about it? I've had a 
couple o' them, an' faith they both o' them opened mine." 




Cole 7-passenger Touring Car, $2175. Cole Aero EIGHT Ultra Suburban, $3275, f.o.b. San Francisco (Space No. 42, Front Corridor) 



Passenger cars and trucks registered in this country for the year 
1922 totaled 12,281,445, according to figures compiled by the B. F. 
Goodrich Rubber Company, which this week released a prelimin- 
ary statement of the result of its annual survey. We note with 
pride that California has crept ahead of Pennsylvania and Illinois 
by 842,663 cars! 



A Frenchman, Dr. Gabriel Bidou, has discovered methods to 
replace paralyzed and useless muscles with mechanical equiva- 
lents. In most cases the "artificial muscle" is a spring, so adjusted 
that when the weight of the body is released from the limb af- 
fected, it is brought forward as it would have done had the muscle 
contracted naturally. 




Reo Sport Phaeton, $1895. New Keo Steel Panel Coupe, $2110, f.o.b. San Francisco. East Room at Auto Sho 



February 17, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 




Dodge Brothers Touring, $1065. Sedan, $1655, f.o.b. San Francisco 



A visitor to Florida asked a negro if he knew of a bathing place 
free from alligators. The negro took him to a nearby spot and the 
visitor enjoyed his bath tremendously, staying in a half hour or 
more. After he came out of the water he asked: "How is it that 
there are no alligators here? Everywhere else I have tried to bathe 
the alligators have been too thick." "Well there's a reason, boss: 
Dese here alligators done been all scared away by the sharks." 



Elsie, aged six, returned unusually early from school the other 
day. She rang the door bell. There was no answer. She rang again, 
a little longer. Still there was no response. A third time she pressed 
the button, long and hard. Nobody came to the door and she pressed 
her nose against the windowpane and in a shrill voice, which caught 
the ears of all the neighbors, called: "It's all right, mama; I'm not 
the Installment Man!" 




Stutz Tinning, $1518.95. Sedan, $2550, f.o.l). San Francisco. Main Corridor Auto Show 



A touch of realism is added to fire drills in Chicago public schools 
by the explosion of "movie" bombs causing smoke to flood the cor- 
ridors and exits. There is no fire but the pupils are not aware of this 
fact. The conduct of the pupils during the drills is excellent. 



A pocket canister or gas mask in the form of a respirator has 
been invented to alleviate the discomfort and danger to engine crews 
when they come in contact with the sulphurous locomotive smoke in 
tunnels. They are cheap and effective and stand up under tests. 




Kind Tinning Car, sifu.Ti Font Passenger Sedan, Ss;58, f.o.b. San Francisco. Wm. I.. Hnghson Company, Ford Comi-r 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 17, 1923 




Overland Sedan, $1035. Touring Car, $(>(>(>, f.o.b. San Francisco 



Hudson Motor Car Company will have shipped this month approx- 
imately 6400 cars of which 3300 will be Hudson and 3100 Essex 
models. January deliveries compare with the aggregate turnout of 
5600 Hudson and Essex cars in December and 2483 in January, 
1922. 



Soviet Russia government has turned automobile maker. The first 
car to come to Riga is described as of 45 horsepower, and weighs 
2530 pounds. It has a speed of 53 miles an hour and seats seven 
passengers. Operation of the factory where the first car was pro- 
duced is said to be in the hands of a staff trained in this country. 




Locomobile Four Passenger Standard Sportif, $1(1,141.25. Imitation Collapsible .l-passenger Sedan, $12,785« f.o.b. San Francisco 

Booth West Boom Auto Show 



Kelly Springfield Tire Company during 1923 will accept no orders 
for original equipment from passenger car manufacturers, except 
at prices closely approximating those paid by the tire dealer, to 
avoid a recent condition when certain car manufacturers, being 
overstocked with tires, unloaded their surplus on the market at only 
a slight advance of the low price they paid, making it impossible 
for a tire dealer to compete with such offerings. 



Sales of the B. F. Goodrich Company for the year ended December 
31, 1922, exceeded $93,000,000, according to preliminary reports, 
as compared with $86,687,339 in 1921. Net earnings, after all 
charges, including depreciation, interest, inventory losses and the like, 
were around $3,000,000, whereas 1921 resulted in a loss of $8,- 
983,401, due principally to heavy declines in market value of ma- 
terials. 




Chandler Two-door Chummy Sedan, Jfil!)H5. Seven Passenger Touring, $17!»r>, f.o.b. San Francisco 



February 17. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 




Stephens Five Passenger Touring, $1545. Five Passenger Sedan, $2195. f.o.b. San Francisco 



Preliminary report of Fisk Rubber Company for 1922 shows net 
earnings of approximately $1,630,000, after interest and deprecia- 
tion charges. Net sales were approximately $45,400,000, a gain of 
about 16 per cent. Unit sales increased about 62 per cent. The 
corporation has current assets in ratio to liabilities of about four 
to one. 



Kellogg Manufacturing Company, Rochester, N. Y., has made dras- 
tic reductions in the list price of the power driven pump it pro- 
duces. The new price is $14 complete on practically every model 
that formerly sold at $18 or more. The reduction is the direct result 
of greatly increased production and brings the list down below that 
obtaining in 1916. 




Stephens Roadster, $1505. Stephens Touring Sedan, $1S!>5, f.o.b. San Francisco 



Really, the police should not assist smuggling to the extent 
of helping to transfer the smuggled stuff. There is a limit within 
which police asquiescence in a breach of the law may be mani- 
fested and this helping to carry away the proscribed booze would 
seem to be a little transcendent of that limit. Yet sympathy is al- 
ways with the smuggler and in spite of all the formal denuncia- 
tion there is a widespread sympathy with the accused policemen. 
We are not defending that sympathy — merely accounting for it. On 



our own part we greatly deprecate any sympathy with law breakers 
of any sort, policemen or otherwise, but at the same time we are 
not so blind that we cannot see that a law. the breaking of which 
produces a great amount of public sympathy with the transgressor, 
is not the sort of law which makes for public righteousness. All 
the feeling should be on the side of the law or the law is unwise. 
The British Scotland Yard man who said that it was well to ex- 
amine how far a law was enforceable before passing it, was wise. 




Cadillac \>« Model Landau sedan. $4820. Touring with Special Don Lee Top, $8725, f.o.b. San F 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 17, 1923 




Stn 



Sedan, $827.48. Star Coupe, $759.66, f.o.l). San Francisco 



Sanitary surveys of the mining camps of Utah, Nevada, California, unsanitary conditions, will be written from time to time with rec- 

Arizona and the states of the Lake Superior district are being con- ommendaticns for the improvement of the latter. These reports as 

tinued by the United States Bureau of Mines, with the object of completed, together with ratings based upon carefully determined 

determining, insofar as possible, the effect of sanitary environment weights or values for the various factors which affect the health 

upon the health of the miner. Reports based on these surveys, call- in the mining camps and communities surveyed, will be forwarded 

ing attention to the especially good sanitary conditions and to the to the operators and others vitally concerned. 




Maxwell Sport Tom inn, $1212, f.o.b. San Francisco 



Chalmers Sedan, $2300, f.o.l). San Francisco 



Two Irish laborers, having had a quarrel, decided to fight it out An amusing story is told in regard to George Mozart. He was 

They asked their boss to be referee, and he consented on condi- recently playing a round of golf with an acquaintance, and at the 

tion that the first one who had had enough should call out "Enough," end of the game the latter began to reckon up their respective 

and the other be considered victor. The fight began, and went on scores. "Good heavens," said Mr. Mozart, "you don't mean to 

until the men were half dead. Then one called out "Enough." "Be say you have been keeping the scores?" "Certainly," was the reply, 

jabbers," gasped the other. "Oi've been trying to think of that word "I'm 92 and you are 127." "All right," was the comedian's re- 

for the last half hour. tort, "but you're not a golfer. You're a chartered accountant." 




Columbia Tom-inn Car, $1185. Sedan, $1505, f.o.b. San Francisco 



February 17, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 




Lafayette Touring, ,1(4850. Four-door Coupe, $6150, f.o.b. .San Francisco 



One addition to the Cadillac line of ten models, being shown for 
the first time at the San Francisco automobile show, is the Landau 
sedan, a new style in Cadillac closed cars, giving an unusual degree 
of privacy, and designed particularly for an exclusive clientele in 
the cities. 

The interior of this new body is almost identical with that of the 
sedan. Externally its appearance has an added touch of smartness 
generally associated with the custom body. 

Its distinguishing features are included in the landau construc- 
tion of the rear section of the upper part of the body. Straight 
grained, enameled, hand-buffed leather replaces the metal construc- 




Willys Knight Coupe-Sedan, !tiin<i.">, f.o.b. San Francisco 

tion and rear side windows of the regular Cadillac sedan, and en- 
tirely encloses the rear seat except a round-cornered rear window. 
Ornamental buggy bows fixed to the sides give the model an added 
touch of individuality. 

In addition to the trunk rack with its grooved bars of highly 
polished aluminum, an exceptionally well built leather trunk, Cad- 
illac manufactured, and containing two leather suit cases, is added 
as standard equipment. 

Additional roominess in the rear compartment of both the sedan 
and the Landau sedan has been obtained by cutting in the lower 
portion of the back cf the front seat. 

Immediately following the automobile show the cut-open chassis 
will be started on a tour of the Northern California Cadillac dealers. 
James E. Bayliss will accompany the chassis and will lecture dur- 
ing the afternoon and evening. During the evening he will ex- 
hibit moving pictures showing the Cadillac factory and motor tours 

in Europe. 

* V * * 

J. R. Millar, president of the California Manufacturers Asso- 
ciation, is about to enter upon a campaign against picketing. He 
says that it interferes with the public as well as with the object 



of the picketing; that is perfectly true. But all of this might be true 
and still the fact of its truth would not have the slightest effect upon 
picketing as a by-product of trade unionism. Legislation won't help 
much, it never does. Whether or not the law would be administered 
would depend entirely upon the relative strength of unionism and 
business in a given district. Convictions, even when the law was 
passed, would also depend upon the same state of facts. It is 
peculiar that anybody as clever as Mr. Millar does not see this. 
But it is a f act. The weakness of picketing lies, not in its im- 
morality which we will concede, but in its ineffectiveness, which can 
be readily shown. It is an obsolete weapon, which was fairly ef- 
fective in an earlier stage of industry, but which cannot be used 
with any degree of certainty at the present time. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 3f 

Bernard Shaw was quite right, you never can tell, and there 
is no worse habit than making up your mind on insufficient evi- 
dence, ^s how? We wrote a paragraph in this issue referring to the 
part played by some of the polxe as reported in the daily press, 
in connection with the smuggling of forbidden liquors. The para- 
graph was all right and thcrcughly justified by the facts. Now, 
however, ccmes the news as to how Captain Goff heroically stood 
up to the gun of a foolishly awkward bootlegger. This was heroism 
of a very high order, and an act of bravery in excess of the ordin- 
ary requirements of duty. If a city were managed with any degree 
of sense Captain Goff should have a special citation for his con- 
duct. So you see the police force is at one and the same time 
heroic and trivial, this latter being as easy a word as we could find. 
And the upshot of the matter, of course, is that the police force 
is essentially and unequivocally human. Most of us are human; 
all of us in fact, except some ladies, from which we deduce that 
we have exactly the police force that we deserve. 









. 



The 



New Peerless 7-pasBeuger Suburban Sedan, st.vjn 
San Francisco, l'ioneer Motor < '". 



f.o.b. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 17, 1923 




Rickenliaoker Sedan, equipped with vibrationless motor, $2285. Phaeton with vibrationless motor, si <;!>.-., f.o.b. San Francisco 



A half million dollars is the cost of a new storage and shipping 
building to be started by the Reo Motor Car Company at Lansing, 
March 1 . It will cover approximately 640,000 square feet, and 
will be three stories high, and will include a train shed which is 
capable of accommodating 72 freight cars at one time. 



Merchandisers of Cole automobiles have decided, at the sugges- 
tion of the factory, to abandon the policy of acceptance of used 
cars as part payment for new ones. This seems not only a good 
thing for the manufacturers, but for the second hand car dealers 
as well. 




Barley Touring Car, !)il(i25. Sedan, $2095, f.o.b. San Francisco 



We add our voice to those who are demanding the completion 
of the Skyline boulevard to Santa Cruz. There is some talk that 
the present board of Highway Commissioners under the compulsion 
of the new economy are about to hedge on the proposal, unless 
they are kept up to the mark by an eager public. So that we have 
nothing but commendation for Supervisor Richard J. Welch, who 
has called a meeting of those representing the various counties and 
requested that the project be accomplished as decided. The answer 
of the commission, through its representative Louis Everding, is by 
no means all it should be, and there is little doubt that greater pres- 
sure will be required lo get this beautiful and necessary project 
thoroughly under way. We are a funny, backward people in some 
respects. There are places in this country where every representa- 
tive of every dominant interest would be moving heaven and earth 
to get anything as beautiful and as ultimately profitable as that 
projected highway. When it is completed we shall have access to 
country which cannot be matched within easy distance of any large 
city and our pre-eminence for scenic beauty will be fixed. 



Do you know that practically everything you eat is handled by a 
motor truck at some time in its journey from the source of supply to 
you. A hundred and one trucks ply the highways between dark and 
daylight, hauling food for consumption in this city, and in every 
city in the country, too. 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



'The Largest Fire Insurance Company in 
America" 

FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, WINDSTORM, 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 
REASONABLE RATES 



SEVENTH ANNUAL 

PACIFIC 
AUTO SHOW 

Exposition Auditorium 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Feb. 17th to 24th 

Complete Showing of New 1923 Models 
"America's Most Beautiful Auto Show" 

G. A. Wahlgreen, Mgr. 



February 17. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



19 




ociet 



ay 



BUSY CUPID 

MOORE-TAYLOR — The marriage of Miss Frances Moore, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. George M. Moore, of Chicago, and Mr. 
Edmund Leslie Taylor, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Taylor, 
of Piedmont, was solemnized on Saturday evening at St. 
Luke's Church. The wedding service was read by Dr. Alex- 
ander Allen. Mrs. James H. Brady and Mrs. Edilberto An- 
derson were the bridal attendants. Mr. Kenneth Gordon was 
best man, and the ushers were Mr. Austin Sperry and Mr. 
Edilberto Anderson. Following the ceremony there was an 
informal reception and wedding supper at the Fairmont Hotel. 
On the conclusion of their honeymoon the couple will reside 
in Bellevue avenue, Oakland. 
CEBRIAN-SANZ — Word of the engagement of Miss Beatrice 
Cebrian, daughter of Mr. Juan C. Cebrian and the late Mrs. 
Cebrian, to Mr. Miguel Sanz of Spain, son of Count de Liz- 
arraga, has been received in San Francisco by the relatives 
of the future bride. Mr. Sanz is in the diplomatic corps of 
the Spanish government and resides in Paris, in which city 
the marriage will be celebrated in March. 
DICKINSON-ADAMS — Announcement of the engagement of Miss 
Lela Dickinson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Dickinson, 
to Lawrence Stowell Adams Jr., son of Captain Lawrence S. 
Adams, U. S. N., was made at a large tea given by Mrs. 
Dickinson and her daughter at the Palace Hotel on Satur- 
day. 
ROLPH-SYMES — Mr. and Mrs. James Rolph Jr. announced the 
betrothal of their daughter, Miss Annette Rolph, to John 
Percival Symes, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Symes of Berke- 
ley, last Friday afternoon at a handsome luncheon party at 
the' Rolph home. The news came as a complete surprise to 
most of Miss Rolph's friends. She has been a popular belle 
ever since leaving school two years ago, and among the sev- 
eral cavaliers who showered attentions on the pretty daughter 
of Mayor and Mrs. Rolph none seemed especially more fav- 
ored than another. Young Symes is a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of California and served with the aviation service dur- 
ing the war. He makes his home with his parents across the 
bay and is in business with a firm of stock brokers in San 

Francisco. 

LUNCHEON'S 

JOHNSON Mrs Aileen Doe Johnson entertained at a luncheon 

Monday at the Hotel St. Francis, when the guests of honor 
were- Mrs. Robert Rogers (Alma Thane) of Spokane, who is 
visiting her mother, Mrs. Arthur Thane, and Mrs. Albert E. 
Gillespie (Mrs. Claudine Cotton Warren), a recent bride, 
and a score of guests enjoyed Mrs. Johnson's hospitality. 

FULTON Mrs. William Fulton gave a luncheon recently, fol- 
lowing this with man jongg, giving this party to meet her 
friend, Mrs. William Rogers of Spokane. 

HA NNA Mrs. Richard J. Hanna was the guest of honor at a 

luncheon party given by Mrs. Clara Louise Darling at the 
Francesca Club recently. 

SHIELS Mrs Charles H. Shiels gave a recent luncheon pait> 

to meet Mrs. William E. Dargit, who returned not long ago 
from a two years" sojourn abroad. 
TEAS 

MOFFITT Mrs James Motrin, who before her marriage last 

fall was Miss Betty Schmieden, gave her Hist large tea at 
her new home on Webster street last week. Mrs. Edward 
i; Schmieden received with her daughter, and the young 
women who attended the bride at her wedding assisted. 

STONE— Miss Jennie Stone presided at a reception Tuesday aft- 
ernoon in the White and Gold ballroom of the Hotel Fan- 
mont. A large number of suests were present. 
BRIDGE 

PETTIGREW— Mrs. Percy PetUgrew, who. with Mr. Pettig 

will leave March 6 lor an extended stay abroad, is being 
attensively entertained. Tuesdaj Mrs Chester Woolsey en- 
tertained at a bridge-luncheon in her honor, and on Satur- 
day evening Mrs. alvah Doe will give a farewell dinner for 
Mr. and Mrs, Pettigrew, 

BLOCK- Mrs Morris Block has sent out cards for a bridge 
luncheon for Wednesday. February 28, a, the Hotel Riche- 
lieu. The affair is in honor of Mrs. Blocks sister. Mrs. Charles 
Hart. 



DINNERS 

SBARBORO — Mr. and Mrs. Kerllo Sbarbnro were hosts at a hand- 
some dinner dance on Saturday evening at their home, cele- 
brating their eighth wedding anniversary. 
CROCKER — Preceding the ball at the Burlingame Country Club, 
Mr. and Mrs. Templeton Crocker entertained at a dinner at 
their Burlingame home. 
r.ortjriOUAZ- Mr. and Mi's. Roger iiocqueraz were li.'sls to a 

group of their friends at dinner Tuesday evening. 
SCOTT — Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Rose Vincent were the guests of 
honor at a dinner at which Mr. and Mrs. Harry Horsley Scott 
entertained on Friday. 
BURGARD — Mr. and Mrs. Clark Burgard, who returned from 
Santa Barbara Tuesday, had a few guests dining with them 
who later attended the fancy dress party at the Burlingame 
Country Club. The party included Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. 
Clarke, Mr. and Mrs. Algernon Gibson and Mr. and Mrs. 
Weeks. 
CAMERON — Mr. and Mrs. George Cameron had some of their 
friends as guests at their home down the peninsula, attend- 
ing the Country Club ball afterwards. 
DANCES 
BURLINGAME COUNTRY CLUB — Six hundred guests attended 
the carnival costume dance with which the members of the 
Burlingame Country Club ushered in the austere Lenten 
season. The Mardi Gras masquerade had for its character 
a three-ringed circus, and all the merrymakers, including 
even the king and queen, were gotten up to represent comic 
characters. "King Comic" himself was Mr. George Nickel, and 
his fair queen, Mr. Stanford Gwin, who impersonated "Queen 
Folly." They formed a rollicking royal household to start 
the fun going. 
CLUB ROYAL — The Mardi Gras ball of the Club Royal, at the 
Fairmont Hotel, took place Tuesday evening. Many of the 
costumes were interesting and amusing. Among those who 
entertained parties of friends were Mr. and Mrs. Harrison 
Dibblee of San Rafael, who had sixteen guests in honor of 
their daughter. Miss Betsy Dibblee. Miss Katherine Mackall 
also was hostess to sixteen guests. Other hosts and hostesses 
were: Mr. and Mrs. A. B. C. Dohrmann Jr., Mr. and Mrs. 
Oswald George Quarre, Mr. and Mrs. Donald Bradford, Miss 
Frances Corbet and Mr. Harold Bowen. 
S. F. YACHT CLUB — The San Francisco Yacht Club held its 
final dance of the season on Saturday evening at the club- 
house in Sausalito. The members of the assemblies and their 
guests appeared in elaborate costumes, representing Shake- 
spearean characters, favorites of the movies and characters 
taken from the comic sheets. The affair was a masquerade 
and took the place of a regular mardi gras. The assemblies 
have brought together this winter a delightful set from San 
Rafael, Ross, Sausalito, Belvedere and many people from 
town. The dances have been such a success that plans are 
being made to hold them again next winter. 
WINTER FROLICS — The last dance of the season of the Winter 
Frolics was held on Saturday evening at the San Francisco 
Golf and Country Club and was more largely attended than 
any other of the affairs given this winter by the popular or- 
ganization. Beside the sub-debutantes, members of the club, 
many of whom will make their formal bow to society next 
season, a number of this winter's debutantes attended the 
dance. Patronesses of the Winter Frolics are: Mrs. James 
Hall Bishop. Mrs. Reginald Knight Smith. Mrs. Charles F. 
Jackson. Mrs. Andrew Welch and Mrs. Cullen F. Welty. 




Under the guidance of R. H. Collins and his as- 
cites, the Peerless was bound to be a better 
and better Peerless. The public response came 
quickly and is indicated by augmented sales in old 
Peerless strongholds and throughout the country 
in general. 

Pioneer Motor Company 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

1900 Van Ness Ave., Corner Washington St. 
Telephone Prospect 8800 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 17, 1923 



MORTON — Gen. and Mrs. Charles Gould Morton entertained at 
a reception and dance given Monday evening at their home 
at Fort Mason, in honor of the latter's daughter, Miss Eliza- 
beth Huff, and the Mortons' house guest, Miss Mary Lewis 
ot Pennsylvania. One hundred and fifty were bidden to the 
enjoyable affair. 

IX TOWN" AND OUT 

TUBES — Mrs. William J. Tubbs and Miss Emelie Tubbs have 
gone to Santa Barbara to enjoy a short sojourn. They have 
taken apartments at the Hotel Arlington. 

EHRMAK — Mr. and Mrs. Alexis Ehrman left for New York en 
route for Europe. They sail on the 2 0th on the Cunard liner 
Berengaria. 

JOHNSON — Major and Mrs. Archibald M. Johnson have been 
visiting at Santa Barbara. They returned to their home in 
Mason street Monday. 

SEARS — .Miss Eleanor Sears of Boston has arrived on a visit to 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Clark and she is their house guest 
at their home in San Mateo. She arrived from the Atlantic 
Coast last week and joined her hosts in Pebble Beach, where 
they were passing the holidays. 

WINSTON — Mrs. John Bandini Winston, her baby and nurse 
left last Saturday for Los Angeles, where they will be guests 
of Mr. Winston's relatives. 

VAN WYCK — Mr. and Mrs. Oze Van Wyck (Mary Boardman), 
whose marriage was a recent event in San Francisco, left 
Monday for their home in Los Angeles, after passing sev- 
eral days in San Francisco as the guests of Mrs. Van Wyck's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Chauncey Boardman, at their 
home in Vallejo street. 

JOHNS — Mr. Van Dyke Johns has returned to San Francisco 
from Baltimore, where he was called with Mrs. Johns shortly 
after Christmas. He is with his son-in-law and daughter, 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Warren Hunt Jr., at their home and 
will be with them until Mrs. Johns' return. 

STOW — Mrs. Edgar Stow has returned to her home in the south 
after a short visit in Redwood City with her husband's cous- 
ins, Mrs. James Robinson and Mrs. Elena Robinson Good- 
win. 

CLUFF — Mrs. William duff, who has been east visiting rela- 
tives and also at White Sulphur Springs, Va., has returned 
and is temporarily at the Palace Hotel until her own home 
at Menlo Park is ready. 

INTIMATIONS 

MORRISON — Mr. Stanley Morrison, who has been quite ill, will 
leave for the southern part of the state as soon as he is 
able to travel, where he and Mrs. Morrison will visit his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Morrison, at their home at 
Redlands. The marriage of the young couple was an event 
of the early winter. Mrs. Morrison, prior to her marriage, 
was Miss Carroll Cambron, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George 
Cambron. 

KUHN — Mrs. William S. Kuhn and her small sons, Lucien and 
Fentriss Kuhn, will leave soon for the Kuhn ranch in Idaho, 
where the boys will visit for several months. Mrs. Kuhn 
will make a brief stay at the ranch and will then go to Palm 
Beach, where her daughters, Miss Marianne and Miss Kath- 
erine Kuhn, are enjoying a gay social season with their aunt, 
Mrs. William Skaife of Pittsburg. There is a probability 
that the Misses Kuhn may go abroad in the spring with their 
aunt. 

WIIjCUTT — Dr. and Mrs. George H. Wilcutt entertained a house 
party over the week end at their country home at Ross. 
Their guests included: Miss Ruth Richards of San Diego. 
Miss Emelie Tubbs, Mr. Philip Baker and Mr. James Stew- 
art. On Saturday evening the Wilcutts and their house guests 
attended the Valentine dinner-dance given at the Marin Golf 
and Country Club. 

ANXESLWY — Countess Annesley, who is here visiting her cous- 
ins. .Mr. and Mrs. Algernon Crofton, is seriously ill at Adler's 
Sanatorium. She had planned to go south at this time. The 
trip is postponed for several weeks. 

BA1LLY — Dr. and Mrs. T. Edward Bailly gave a most enjoyable 
party on Saturday evening at their handsome home in town, 
having a hundred of the sub-debutante friends of their daugh- 
ter. Miss Doris. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 



Van Ness Ave., at Geary Street 



SAX FRANCISCO 

Is the most refined family hotel in the city 

— a home unsurpassed 

ELMER M. WOODBURY Manager 



BOURN — "Filoli," the beautiful country home of Mr. and Mrs. 
William Bowers Bourn, was the setting on Saturday after- 
noon of an enjoyable Valentine party. Mrs. Bourn entertained 
at a large children's party in honor of the birthday of her 
small grandchild, little Miss Elizabeth Vincent, the daughter 
of the Arthur Rose Vincents. 

WINN — General and Mrs. Frank Winn have taken posession 
of the Clay street residence of Mr. and Mrs. T. Danforth 
Boardman during the absence of the Boardmans in Europe. 

DEL MONTE — A new location for the trapshooting grounds at 
Del Monte has been found on the upper end of the Polo 
Fields. The two traps face north and Lewis Pierce, George H. 
Anderson. Jack Bare and other "Indians." who have inspected 
the traps, are enthused over the prospects of some high scores 
being established. 

The Monterey Gun Club is now staging a series of shoots 
every Sunday morning over the Del Monte traps to select 
a ten-man team to meet the Los Gatos Gun Club in a team 
shoot at Del Monte on Sunday, February 18. Monterey is 
developing some good gunners in Roy Frisbie, Dr. W. L. 
Teaby, Tom Work, Richieson, Cox, McFadden brothers and 
a number of others. Much interest is being taken in trap- 
shooting here and there will probably be three or four squads 
of local scatter-gun artists in the Indians' tournament. 
The Pacific Coast polo championship at Del Monte will take 
place on March 23 to April 15. It is the first time that a 
duly sanctioned polo championship has been carded on the 
coast and keen interest is being displayed. The assured 
entries so far are Del Monte, San Mateo, Midwick, River- 
side, 11th U. S. Cavalry, George Moore's Free Booters, Hono- 
lulu and Fort Bliss, Texas, and there are prospects of two 
or three others coming in. It will be the greatest gathering 
of polo teams ever seen on the coast. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 6130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



Another Guaranteed Gardner 




We extend to the 1923 Gardner a one-year 
WRITTEN GUARANTEE 

— Because it is a Four, with the assured economy found 
in Fours alone. 

— Because the FIVE-BEARING CRANKSHAFT, a fea- 
ture found in no other four-cylinder motor, makes 
possible exceptional power and flexibility without 
the vibration that shortens the life of engines less 
well built. 

— Because it is a car of BALANCED VALUE, with a 
sturdy chassis; well-built, comfortable body; last- 
ing finish — a car made for long and trouble-free 
service. 

— Because it is the product of an organization that has 
served the public with dependable transportation for 
more than 4 years. 

Let us demonstrate the 1923 Gardner. The story is best 
told on the road 

J. W. FRAWLEY, Inc. 

1135 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Prospect 9160 



February 17, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



21 



Hurdling; the Years With Kathleen Norris 



By KITTY PARSONS 



WE HAVE heard, of course, of poet's license, but this is a 
pale and colorless thing compared to the license of the prose 
writer of "Certain People of Importance." The passing of years 
and time mean absolutely nothing to the courageous Mrs. Norris, 
who leaps back and forth through the ages of her "Important Peo- 
ple," with a license that the most dauntless poet might truly envy. 

In the early part of the story (page 25), Victoria, "at twenty- 
two, was not out of the nursery." At the same time her cousin, 
Nellie, (p. 44.) was "as ignorant of life at her twenty-two years," 
etc. All well and good! Given two pure unsophisticated young 
ladies, who are excellently brought up, and what is the result? 
Remarkable indeed! On the very same afternoon in our story, 
(p. 51) Mrs. Norris tells us that Nelly is "only a year older than 
Victoria." How can these things be! 

Victoria's progress throughout the entire book is most unusual. 
The dear child was about four and Bertie five, when Lou was 
born (p. 485) ; but on page 30, Lou is seventeen when Victoria is 
twenty-two. Lou slips back a little here. 

The Henry Crabtree family do some excellent work in the mat- 
ter of ages. On Page 36, they have been married sixteen years 
and on the same day (p. 37), their daughter Alice is sixteen years 
old. There must be a mistake somewhere! The same state of con- 
fusion occurs in the esteemed clergyman's family. Vernon Yelland's 
wife dies when they have been married five years (p. 436). Six 
months later and eleven pages further on, we hear that his second 
child is "nearly four." We already know that his first-born is at 
least a year and a half older than little Vernon, for when she was 
three, Vernon could net walk a step. It is really unkind to involve 
the superior IVr. Yelland by these sweepstakes measures of gaging 
dates. 

Harry Crabtree is one of the fastest travelers in the book, while 
his son, George, is a long way behind. On page 62 Harry is forty- 
three and George is twelve; nothing at all the matter with that. 
Now, make way for Harry! On page 242, little Georgie is fifteen, 
and a day or two later (p. 248), his speedy papa, is "perfectly con- 
fident for the first time in his fifty years." I should think he might 
be at that rate! 

One is reminded about this time of the old problem, "How old 
is Ann?" We might apply it something like this: "If Georgie is 
twelve when Victoria is twenty-two, and Georgie is fifteen seven 
years later, how old is Reuben?" I think myself that George had 
rather a raw deal. 

Lola is another girl who grows very rapidly. When she is thir- 
teen (p. 98), Victoria is over twenty-two. Immediately after this 
Victoria suffers from a case of arrested development and Lola be- 
gins to catch up a little. When the older girl is twenty-six Lola, 
at the time of her wedding, is "almost twenty." The extraordinary 
female has in some marvelous way lessened the difference between 
their ages by almost three years. 

Old Reuben Crabtree is not outdone by his remarkable grand- 
children in the matter of putting on years. At the start he is seven- 
ty-five when Victoria is twenty-two. As time goes on his lead in- 
creased and a few months later when Victoria is twenty-six (p. 300) 
he is eighty-one or two- his daughters are not sure just which — 
page 306. The old gentleman has made six or seven years while 
his granddaughter has only a paltry four to her credit. But is 
Victoria discouraged by the hurdling method of grandpa? Indeed 



no! \ou do not appreciate Victoria. She knows that she cannot 
hope to outdistance the advanced octogenerian but she can at least 
catch up a little. Her coup de'etat comes when on page 379, "a 
grewn woman of twenty-seven," she "decides to run away from 
her family." Half an hour later (p. 383), "Victoria, for the first 
time in her twenty-eight years was talking to a man honestly and 
simply." Score for Victoria! Even grandfather could not gain a 
year in a single afternoon. He is rather non-plussed by her prog- 
ress, and for a time slows down at bit — probably from shock. When 
Victoria is thirty (p. 422), he is content to be only eighty-four. Soon 
after this announcement the old warrior wearied of jumping and 
departed this world. 

Miraculous and astonishing are the feats accomplished by the 
brilliant author of this book. Indeed, these are but a few of the 
skips and jumps that her "Certain People of Importance" make 
throughout the space of time that the story covers. For authors 
who are not particularly good at arithmetic, one might suggest a 
family tree, properly dated and arranged for frequent reference. 
Checking up as the years fly by, there could be little opportunity 
for so much high-hurdling through the different branches. Time, 
however, appears to be a minor consideration in the mind of Mrs. 
Norris. 



Ford Motor Corrpany has turned out its 7,000,000th automobile. 

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BERT LATHAM, Inc. 

928 Van Ness Ave. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 17, 1923 




PL/E/ASURI/S WAND 



"Obey No Wand but Pleasure's.' 



-Tom Moore. 




Columbia 

Fritz Leiber's Macbeth is an interesting 
performance and leaves one in just the right 
state of mind, that of wanting to see more 
of this good looking, clear-voiced, courag- 
eous young actor. Courageous because he 
dares a number of innovations. Of course 
the Shakespearean traditions are sacred, but 
it is a real pleasure to see a Macbeth with 
some ideas r f his own. The play is a gloomy 
one at best and the emotions of the char- 
acters are a long, long way off, but Leiber 
puts great force into his acting and gives 
a fine and finished performance. The Lady 
Macbeth of Olive Oliver is a revelation. She 
has the true gift for tragedy. The rest of 
the company are satisfactory, and the pros- 
pect of the Shakespearean repertoire at the 
Columbia for the next fortnight is a bright 
one. 



Crpheum 

Irene Castle continues to delight her large 
audiences with charming motion pictures and 
personal appearance in several artistic 
dances. Johnson and Baker do a lot of 
dexterous hat-throwing and make their act 
amusing with breezy fun and frolic. Hap 
and Florence Farnell give a swift-moving 
turn of rhyming nonsense. Milt Collins is 
genuinely funny in his own original style 
of monologue. Harry Langdon in "After the 
Ball" has a side-splitting travesty on the 
game of golf. The Seattle Harmony Kings 
make good music and many friends among 
their listeners who call for them again and 
again. Prominent in the big Orpheum en- 
tertainment, as always, is the musical direc- 
tor, Raymond Bone. 



Granada 

The picture of the week, "The Hero," is 
saved from mere mediocrity by a wonderful 
fire scene which is the most exciting ever 
screened, and gives Gaston Glass the great 
opportunity of his life to show what dra- 
matic stuff he is made of. Up to the mo- 
ment when the school house caught fire this 
leading man made rather a poor showing, 
but he redeemed himself in the eyes of all 
and atoned for his past shortcomings by his 
heroic behavior in the time of danger. Bar- 
bara LaMarr is pleasing to look at and Doris 
Pawn does some good acting, while the parts 
assigned to John Sainopolis and Frankie 
Lee are well sustained. 

The Venetian carnival put on by Paul 
Ash is a wonderful scenic triumph, and his 
orchestra are kept busy with their various 
antics of song and dance. Wallace at the 
organ gives a beautiful rendition of Flo- 
tow's "Stradella." Louise Fazenda in the 
comedy "Pest of the Storm Country" adds 
to the gaiety of the evening. 



California 

The personal appearance of Reginald 
Denny is an agreeable surprise, for who 
knew that this handsome young "leather 
pusher" had a delightful baritone voice and 
could sing old fashioned ballads in a really 
charming manner! This he does and wins 
many new admirers. The picture, "When 
Kane Met Abel," is on the screen this week 




Fritz Leiber in Marc Anthony 
at Columbia 

and contains some strong scenes and of 
course a large amount of athletic acting. 

In addition to a long and well selected 
program is the big feature play, "Dark Sec- 
rets," with Dorothy Dalton in a congenial 
rcle and Robert Ellis playing opposite her. 
The story of the society girl and the Egyp- 
tian hypnotist is told in an interesting man- 
ner. 



Orpheum Advance Notice 

Will Faversham, the distinguished dra- 
matic star, heads the Orpheum bill which 
opens Sunday matinee, February 18. Mark- 
ing his first bow to vaudeville audiences, Mr. 
Faversham brings an aristocrat among one- 
act plays, "A Marriage Has Been Arranged," 
by Alfred Sutro, for his two-a-day debut. 
Frank Davis and Alele Darness are musical 
comedy funsters who bring a great comedy 
skit called "Birdseed." 

Jack Osterman is probably the youngest 
of vaudeville singles and still one of the 
most successful. He combines the irresis- 
tability of youth and inherited ability with 
sparkling bits of stories and songs. 

The introduction to San Francisco audi- 
ences as a vaudeville act takes place with 
the appearance of Frances Williams and Miss 
Vannessi. Both local girls are proteges of 
Fanchon and Marco. They have a specially 
staged production, and special numbers. 

Two pretty misses remembered from their 
work with Harry Correll, who since that time 
have gained eastern success, are the Love 
Twins in "The Two Little Loving Love 
Birds." 



Carl, Francis and Claire present a minia- 
ture farce entitled "Thanksgiving." Lucas 
and Inez, perfectly proportioned, present a 
beautiful act entitled "An Art Classic." Their 
imitation of the slow motion camera is a 
masterpiece of physical development. Al & 
Art Borton present "Kentucky U. S. A." 



Exposition Symphony 

The most attractive program of the highly 
successful season of popular municipal con- 
certs given by the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra has been reserved for the fifth 
and last, to take place at the Exposition 
auditorium on Saturday evening, March 3. 
Not only are the orchestral numbers chosen 
by Conductor Alfred Hertz of the highest 
order, but, in addition, there will be two 
notable soloists to lend variety to the musical 
offering, as Efrem Zimbalist will be the 
violin soloist of the evening, and Warren 
D. Allen, the distinguished organist of Stan- 
ford University, will play Boellman's Fan- 
tasie. 

The program will open with Liezt's sym- 
phonic poem, "The Preludes," and the other 
numbers will be the Rimsky-Korsakow Span- 
ish Caprice and the wonderful 1812 Over- 
ture, by Tschaikowsky. 



Craig Hutchinson, director, and his com- 
pany finished on Friday at the New Gerson 
studios, their picture "Tiberious Tinker Press 
Agent," second of the series from Peter B. 
Kyne's stories. Work on the third picture 
began on Tuesday. 



DESTINATIONS 

People walking up hill 
Say with dubious pace: 
A road so ruthless cannot 
Lead to a pleasant place. 

People walking down hill 
Speak with certainty: 
This neat road must be leading 
To an orchard, or the sea. 

—Hazel Hall. 



THE WISE WOMAN 

She must be rich who can forgo 

An hour so jeweled with delight; 
She must have treasuries of joy 
That she can draw on day and night. 

She must be sure of heaven itself. 

Or is it only that she feels 
How much more safe it is to lack 

A thing that fate so often steals? 

— By Sara Teasdale. 



February 17, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



23 




Chaos in Europe Brings Treasures to this City 



»SSHS[S»&SlllB][8Hl[S[a8ililKH®IB^ 




THE state of chaos in Europe, which fol- 
lowed the war, was provocative of some 
good, as well as evil things. It flooded this 
country for the time being with European 
artists and musicians, and coming nearer 
home, it was instrumental in bringing to 
San Francisco a collection of art treasures 
exhibited here for the first time in any Amer- 
ican city. 

The American International Art Exposi- 
tion, Inc., at 517 Sutter street, was organ- 
ized as a company for the purpose of sell- 
ing in the United States notable oil paint- 
ings obtained in Europe because of the un- 
settled conditions there. 

The present exhibit comprises the collec- 
tion brought to the United States by the son 
of the late Chevalier Tomasso Arno of Na- 
ples, Italy, who was for over half a century 
recognized as a leading connoisseur and col- 
lector of art in Italy. This collection also 
includes various pictures from the Von Wil- 
ier Estate of Fratta, Italy, and many mod- 
ern works secured from the artists direct. 

Prof. D. Buorgiorno is the president and 
connoisseur of the corporation, and several 
of his own paintings are on exhibit. This 
artist has paintings in the Church of Saint 
Clara, New York; in the Church of the 
Sacred Heart in Boston, and in other east- 
ern cities. Prof. Buorgiorno was the pro- 
fessor of drawing in the Royal Academy of 
Naples, and has exhibited at the institute 
of Fine Arts in Naples. 

Lovers of the antique will revel in pic- 
tures of the Italian Old Masters, who lived 
and worked in the I 7th century, and whose 
work impresses one as if they loved every 
stroke of their brushes, as if indeed, these 
were the labor of love. Among them are 
Jusepe de Ribera, Sebastian Conca, Luca 
Giordano and Salvatore Rosa; while artists 
of other countries who worked in this pe- 
riod, are Van Miel (Dutch), Philip Suster- 
mann (Flemish), B. Boullongue (French). 
Representing the 18th century is Jacob Hus- 
mans, also of Holland. 

English old masters are represented by 
John Constable, who besides being a great 
painter, had the unusual quality of praising 
greatly whatever he admired in the work of 
others; and Sir Henry Raeburn, whose 
"Portrait of an English Gentleman" at the 
present exhibit, should be viewed by lovers 
of the Academic school (and to advantage 
by some of the modern art faddists!). 

Among the moderns are A. Simonetti, who 
has various canvases in the Museum of Art 
in New York; A. Mancini and G. Mackie- 
wicz, both well known artists; P. Schreiber, 
who though German, delights in Oriental 
subjects, and F. De Nicola. The works of 
A. Federico are alone worth a visit to this 
gallery. His "Entrance of Blue Grotto in 



Capri" will satisfy the lover of exquisite 
coloring; "Sail Boats," in a bluish gray sea 
and atmosphere, and "Sunset" lighting up 
a snowy road in the naked woods, are as 
fine pictures as this writer has seen for many 
a moon. 

Two unique paintings on copper by Van- 
vitelli, of the Neopolitan school of art, done 
in the 18th century, will appeal to the ad- 
mirer of the unusual. 



throughout California, as life insurance is 
generally regarded as one of the best busi- 
ness barometers. 



INSURANCE ITEM 

Arthur J. Hill, California manager for the 
State Life Insurance Company of Indiana, 
reports that 101 applications, representing 
over $300,000 of business, were forwarded 
to the company's home office on February 
6 by the San Francisco district representa- 
tive. This was independent of the applica- 
tions forwarded from other parts of the 
state, and was written in the regular routine, 
there being no special drive nor inducements 
offered. Manager Hill states that the busi- 
ness of the California agency for the year 
thus far is exceeding that of 1922, which 
held the record. This report is especially 
significant of the improved conditions 



A GOOD LEGAL LECTURE 

Students and members of the faculty of 
the San Francisco Law School are enthu- 
iastic over an address made before them last 
Wednesday night in the Call building by 
Attorney John L. McNab on the "Strategy 
of the Court Room." 

Mr. McNab related incidents occurring in 
many of the famous legal battles of Cali- 
fornia, illustrative of how these battles were 
won or lost. He also told of his experiences 
as a young attorney of the Mendicino bar. 

He said that in the future the law schools 
of the country would teach the art of read- 
ing human personality; that the lawyer of 
the future must be able to analyze character 
tc aid in picking jurors and determining the 
sincerity of witnesses. 



"Daughter, doesn't that young man know 
how to say good-night?" 
"Oh, daddy! I'll say he does!" — Exchange. 



100% 

INCREASE 



IN 



CADILLAC 
SALES 

in 1922 over year previous 



The Cadillac stands higher today 
in the esteem of the public than 
ever before in its glorious history. 



B> 



TO 




Van Ness Avenue at O'Farrell Street 



24 





FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Gough 
Telephone Park 271 



SAH PRAHC1SCO 



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DAILY 



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and Loges 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

FILM FLICKS 



Wedding Presents^ — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



By AGNES KERR CRAWFORD 

Norma Talmadge, Lew Cody, Frank Lloyd, 
direc'or, Harry Weill, assistant director, Tony 
Gaudio, cameraman and ten other members 
of the cast and staff of "Within the Law" 
came to San Francisco on last Tuesday to 
shoot some scenes for the picture now in 
the making by Metro. On Wednesday even- 
ing quite a crowd gathered to watch Norma 
Talmadge (or her double) jump into the dark 
cold waters of the bay, off pier 46, to be 
followed in the plunge and rescued by Lew 
Cody. 

% ifi Sfi 

N. Dragomanovich, head of the West 
Coast Films Corporation, left for Los An- 
geles last Saturday, where he will remain 
for a week on business for the company. 
They expect to resume production in the 
very near future on a regular schedule basis. 

Miss Thorn, head of the Screen Service 
Bureau at 25 Stockton street, has organized 
a club for the study of the art of acting on 
the stage or screen. There are about fifty 
members who meet twice a week. C. L. 
Packard, lately director for the Northern 
California Photo Plays, is giving them in- 
structions in acting and make-up. 

Phyllis Haver, of the Mack Sennett forces, 
came to San Francisco last week "just to 
shop," as she says we are the Paris of the 
west when it comes to shops and styles. 

Harry Carey was in San Francisco all last 
week appearing in a vaudeville stunt at the 
Golden Gate theater on the bill with his pic- 
ture "Good Men and True." Also while here 
he tried his best to beg or bribe Chief 
O'Brien of the force to sell him a police horse 
for use in the films, as he says the San 
Francisco police force has some of the fin- 
est horses in the world. 

Eric Van Stroheim has finished the con- 
tinuity for "McTeague" from Frank Norris' 
story, and has gone to Los Angeles for a 
few days to complete his cast. He will be- 
gin work here on the picture about Feb- 
ruary 15. 

The Redwood Film Corporation of this 
city announces that they will begin produc- 
tion the first of March. They will work at 
the new Paul Gerson studios, their first pic- 
ture will be "The Three Mile Limit," a 
smuggling story by Walter Montague, with 
an all-star cast. Shirwood McDonald will 
direct, with Richard Kipling as co-director. 

Monty Banks arrived in San Francisco last 
Sunday for a few days' stay. 
* * * 

Winfield R. Sheehan, vice president and 
general manager of the Fox Film Corpora- 
tion, is confined to bed seriously ill, at the 
St. Francis. 




.•^■aJl 






The 

HOTEL 

gTfRANCIS 

Hotel St. Francis Dance Orchestra 
Directed by 

FRANK ELLIS 

'Dancing Every Evening 
IN THE GARDEN 

DINNER AFTER. THEATRE 

Th os. J.Coleman 

MANAGKR 



Cafe Marquard 

GEARY AND MASON STREETS 
Telephone Prospect 61 

Visitors In San Francisco Delight In the 
Gay Bohemian Atmosphere, the Enter- 
tainment and Dancing, the Rare Quality 
of Food and Courteous Service 



LUNCHEON 

Continental Style 

Twenty-six Delicious Dishes. Prepared 

and Served So Differently 



DINNER 



Every Evening — Six to Nine 
Also Select a la Carte 



Dancing and Cabaret 



Teeth 



A minute examination of your teeth 
made several time* a year will enable 
von to arrest any incipient disease uf the 
gum* before It lias a chance to reach the 
acute Stave. Our examinations are free. 
If there Is no immediate need for our 
services there will be no charge. We are 
always pleased to talk It over. Red gums 
or sore teeth sometimes lead to serious 
disorders. Watch your teeth. You will 
like our nerve blocking system ; It takes 
away all the pain and keeps you happy. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Garfleld 831! 
SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns: 
Self Cleansing Bridges; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Platen. 



February 17, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



25 



How can you be sure — 
of obtaining eye glasses that are exactly 
correct, comfortable and stylish and guar- 
anteed to be so — only by having them 
made by those who have an indisputable 
reputation for strict reliability, ability and 
whose experience entitles them to your 
utmost confidence— such has been our rep- 
utation for over a third of a century. 

IV. D. Fennlmore A. R. Fennlmora 

J. \\. Davis 




% 



s^r 



m^m 



San Francisco - 181 Post, 2608 Mission Sts. 
Berkeley - 2106 Shattack Atsdub 

Oakland ------ 1221 Broadway 




'Dreams 

"Fair Women"— his 

"Brave Men" — hers 

after the late 
supper at the 

Where good digestion 
waits on appetite 

San Francisco 

33 Powell Street, near Marxec 

130 Post Street, near Grant Ave. 

Oakland 

« 511 Fourteenth Street 



VISIT 



"The 
Catacombs" 

AT 

CYPRESS LAWN 
CEMETERY 

City Office: 

995 Market St. 

San Francisco 

PHONES: SUTTER 695 

DOUGLAS 4772 



DIVIDE DISTRICT 



By HERMAN ZADIG 

IF YOU will take an auto trip and go south 
from Tonopah the first camp you will 
find is the Divide District, where without 
much ncise the Tonopah Divide mine is go- 
ing ahead, taking out a large tonnage of 
fine ore month after month and adding to its 
treasury, which already is a substantial one. 

The last report from the company's of- 
fice is that the production for the month of 
December was 1269 tons averaging $43 per 
ton. This is certainly a very fine showing. 

After the first of March the company ex- 
pects to take out 100 tons per day, which 
will be shipped to the Belmont mill. 

Here is a property that has paid its way 
from the grass roots down, only calling for 
one assessment at the time the company 
was reorganized. It has at present over 
$375,000 in its treasury, all of which has 
come from above the 800-foot level. 

They are at present running a drift on 
their HOO-foot level to strike the downward 
continuation of this ore body. 

On the 1400-foot level they struck a 
heavy flow of hot water which is a good 
indication of reaching the sulphide zone. A 
body of ore in this property at a depth of 
1 400 feet would mean a great revival of 
many other properties, which during the year 
of activity in the Divide District started to 
sink shafts to open up these properties at 
greater dep'.h, when the excitement subsided 
and these properties closed down and have 
since been waiting for the Tonopah Divide 
to make good. 

Nearly every mining camp has had the 
same experience, and it is no surprise to 
me that the Divide District has had to 
undergo the same disappointments. 

Large bodies of ore above the 800-foot 
level and the large flow of hot water on the 
1400-foot level certainly indicates that the 
Divide property will prove the existence of 
a large body of ore at depth. If I am correct 
in this you will see a revival in Divide shares 
similar to the boom in Goldfield in the latter 
part of 1906. 



"Prohibition has taught me one thing." 
"What is it?" 

"That it is impossible for me to get along 
without liquor. I used to think I could." 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter. Just Out 

3*0 ISu-b street 
Phone Kearny 17:5 San Francisco. Cal. 



St. Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 



Enroll Now in 



COSGROVE'S SCHOOL 

of 

Hair Dressing 

and 

Beauty Culture 

A course in the above makes you in- 
dependent. See 

MR. AND MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Kearny 2842 



Mayerle's 




Expert Optical Service and 

Scientific Eye Examinations 

960 Market Street 

29 Years in San Francisco 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a little better than seems nece usury" 
The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
rovers are sold in similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
37-45 First Street - - San Francisco 



W.W.HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Brotsr 

208 CROCKER HOLDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San FrancUeo 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 17. 1923 



Fred Kahn 



Automotive Engineering in it3 
Entirety 

UNDER ONE ROOF 



General Repairing and Overhauling 

Fender and Ignition 

Radiator Work Welding 

Body Building Brazing 

Woodwork Blacksmithing 

Machine Work Electrical 

Carburetion 



Experts in Every Branch 
1507 SUTTER Telephone West 8296 

Authorized Elgin Parts and Service 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering: a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3410 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



g k x it k a ;_: :: ;_: sk«» s gUf S EEKE&MEgMMM, 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Hours : 2 till 4 , and by Appointment 

Phone Sailer 1718 

REMOVED TO 

Howard Building:* 209 Post Street 

Corner Grant Avenue, San Franolieo 



Sunbeams 



i 

a 



HggSHBBHBHSJEIgBglBHBBHSiSlSgHHSBBS 

Frosh — I've been trying to think of a word 
tor two weeks. 

Soph — How about fortnight? — Syracuse 
Orange Peel. 



Dorothy, aged seven, and her mother were 
making their first trip across the Atlantic 
to meet father in London. The weather had 
been beautiful and calm for the first two 
days, but on this, the third morning, the 
ship was rolling and pitching heavily. 

Dorothy awoke her mother from an un- 
easy slumber. "Mamma, what is the matter 
with the boat today? Are we on a detour?" 



One of the boys at the Putnam County 
Orphanage was protesting to a fellow-in- 
mate about having to go to school. He was 
overheard by one of the officials, who ex- 
claimed: 

"Why, Robert Dillion, what do you mean? 
You should be ashamed of yourself." 

"What's the use?" the little boy returned, 
"my history book says that Lincoln didn't." 
— Indianapolis News. 



Once upon a time there was small boy 
who always came to the table with dirty 
hands and had to be sent away to wash 
them. 

"Why don't you wash your hands before 
you sit down?" said his mother. "You know 
perfectly well I shall send you upstairs to 
do it." 

"Well, once you forgot," said he. 



Soldier — I lost all my clothes last night. 
Gob — Where did you put them? 
"In the cupboard near by hammock." 
"You poor sap. That was no cupboard — 
that was a porthole." 

"Why do they use knots in the ocean," 
asked the fair young thing as she came 
aboard one afternoon. Replied one of the 
advancing sailors, "Why to keep the ocean 
tide." 



Teacher — Where's the capital of the Unit- 
ed States. 

Son of World War Vet — In Europe. 



Willis — All you think about is pleasure. 
Mrs. Willis — That's right. The only pleas- 
ure I get is thinking about it. 



Quality 1866-66 Years -1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Burltncame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodslde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works : 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

Sun Francisco Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEXEON ' 

*■ process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



1140 Geary Street 



Tel. Franklin 3685 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

M 4-1 it | Work Appertaining to Automobiles 

Oxy-Acetylene Welding — Blacksmitblnr 

H. W. Culver M. l>aberer E. Johnson 



LEE S. DOLSON 



CHAS. J. EVANS 



Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 

$1.25 

MealB Served a la Carte. Also Regular 

French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Suits Pressed by Hand, Only — 
Suits Culled for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 
433 Mason St. Pbone Franklin 3510 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 




Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 
WALTER W. DERR . . Manager 

105 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 30th, 1922 

Assets $80,671,392.53 

Deposits 76,921,392.53 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,750,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 400,613.61 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haiftht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors cf Four and One-quarter 

(4M) P er cent per annum was declared for the six 

months ending December 31st, 1922. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 
Anglo-London-Paris Company 



Sutter and Sansome Street! 

Phone Kearny 5600 
San Francisco, Calif. 



RECOMMENDS 



Irrigation District Bonds 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 

first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6 3/4% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOXD 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserie Fond 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG.: NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



£>an STrmtrtara ffiljnmtrte 



Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coa9t 

A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for $1.15 a month- 
including Sunday editions 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster 




••T.BU.-EO !•<• 



N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 1 1 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



TYPEWRITERS 

Guaranteed Factory Rebuilt 

All Makes ■«»»■>> 

""*"* REPAIRED 

See the New Remington Portable 
The Standard Keyboard Portable 

Paper — Ribbons — Carbon — Supplies 
AMERICAN WRITING MACHINE CO. 

506 Market St., Ban Fran. Phone i>ouk, fi49 
308 I -Mil SI.. Oakland I'lione Oakland 'i?64 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.).... 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. .$1.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 



ASK YOUR DEALER! 







Keaton Tire and Rubber Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



"WHOLESALE ONLY" 

LOS ANGELES PORTLAND SEATTLE 




PRICE 10 CENTS 




California Advertiser 



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1923 



$5.00 PER YEAR 



LOS ANGELES 




Land's End 

To watch the sea rein back 

Tier restless white nianed pack. 

That instant ere she flings them free 
To thunder down the track! 



The Rainy Season 
Is Here 

Equip Your Car With 

SAMSON 
CORDS 

They Don't Skid 

Willie Ritchie Co. 

Van Ness Avenue at Ellis Street 
San Francisco 



/ 




Announcing the Completion 

of the Red Square 

Vacuum Cup Cord Line! 

We are positive no tire ever introduced was accepted 
with the whole-hearted enthusiasm that marked the an- 
nouncement of Pennsylvania Red Square Vacuum Cup 
Cord Tires in Ford sizes. 

The reasons are obvious: 

Cord tires which strictly maintain the Penn- 
svlvania standard ot highest quality; 

Cord tires readily interchangeable with the 
thousands of fabric tires now in use; 

Cord tires selling at prices so moderate as to 
make the change from fabric to cord equip- 
ment a matter of actual economy. 

TANSEY- CROWE COMPANY 

1233 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Prospect 2000 



Another Guaranteed Gardner 

4Fr 




We extend to the 1923 Gardner a one-year 
WRITTEN GUARANTEE 

— Because it is a Four, with the assured economy found 
in Fours alone. 

— Because the FIVE-BEARING CRANKSHAFT, a fea- 
ture found in no other four-cylinder motor, makes 
possible exceptional power and flexibility without 
the vibration that shortens the life of engines less 
well built. 

— Because it is a car of BALANCED VALUE, with a 
sturdy chassis; well-built, comfortable body; last- 
ing finish — a car made for long and trouble-free 
service. 

— Because it is the product of an organization that has 
served the public with dependable transportation for 
more than 40 years. 

Let us demonstrate the 1923 Gardner. The story is best 
told on the road 

J. W. FRAWLEY, Inc. 

1135 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Prospect 9160 



;: :: j: :,• :: ;: :::::: :i :: :: :: :: :: ;: j: :: :: :: 









The Mother Goose 
Confections 

Here is Something G I^ew! 



A confection made of California's most 
perfect fruits and berries, scientifically pro- 
cessed, chocolate-coated or "candied" in 
their own juices. 

The natural sugar of the fruits produces a 
PERFECT Candy. 

Dipped in chocolate perpetuates the nat- 
ural exquisite flavor and fragrance. 

wo Varieties, 5c to $1.50 Each 

One pound box by mail postpaid, $1.00. 

Send a box to your eastern friends. 

Visit our Art Gallery of Mother Goose 
paintings by Chas. A. Holland, the world's 
famed artist. 

^Mother (joose Confection Co., Inc. 

1214 Market St., San Francisco 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1866 




Iter 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 





VOL. CII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1923 



No. 8 



THE SAX FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets. 
San Francisco. Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco. 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office : Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill. E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year. $6.00 ; Canada, one year. $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



— Friend Richardson is reducing the state budget to a mere baga- 
telle. 

J£ tfi !£ 

— The strenuous and ever youthful Eleanora Sears is with us 
again. Eleanora should put her talents and energy into discovering 

the secret of perpetual motion! 

* * * 

— Just now, with all this talk about Tutenkhamun's tomb, etc., 
and the recent discovery of relics on Easter Island, there is what 
might be called a "flurry in fossils." 

— In spite of wireless and radiograph, the sea exacts its toll. 
And the fact that the loss of life has not diminished since 1904, 
gives one pause. Is there indeed, "a destiny that shapes our ends? 

* * * 

— Our Town Crier is at times rather hard on the fair sex. In 
this instance of ladies and the law, however, in this issue, he may 
be right, for he knows more about the law than we do, even if he 

doesn't know more about the ladies. 

* * * 

— At a recent raid on the Merchants' Exchange Club by pro- 
hibition agents, when the said club was accused of violating the 
Volstead act, at least two of the members had some ef the "mak- 
i ngs "_A. S. Nelson (grain dealer) and E. Clement Horst (hop 
grower) ! 

— That little schooner hovering beyond the three-mile limit, out- 
side the "heads" has something aboard aside from her suspected 
cargo of whisky. That something is Romance, for smuggling goes 
hand-in-hand with Romance and Adventure. And when Adventure 

beckons, men will follow. 

» * * 

— Some Doctor of Divinity up Seattle way is voicing his little 
peep against the sinful and licentious display of ladies' legs for 
the advertising of hosiery, etc., in the current catalogs. One would 
imagine that the reverend considers legs the unpardonable crime. 
One must have them you know, doctor! 
* * * 

— Says Henry Ford : "The instincts of the people are wiser than 
the wisdom of the governments, and by instinct the people simply 
do not care that the old Europe should be saved. By instinct the 
American people feel the same way!" Wise old Henry Ford! He 
has his hand on the pulse of the people! Out of all this chaos 
and revolution should evolve a new Europe, governed by the peo- 
ple. 



— As regards divorce, it would seem that Turkey is ahead of 
our own country. The rights of divorce are equal for the man and 
woman, and to obtain a legal separation, it is sufficient for either 
one or the other to declare their desire to be divorced, on con- 
dition that this clause has been inserted in the marriage contract. 

— Under the tax proposed by Tory members of the English par- 
liament on citizens of the United States entering and leaving Great 
Britain, our mother country will be like the proverbial church bazaar, 
it will cost more to get out than to get in. And under this tax, 
America will be paying off England's debt to her. Who says the 
English are slow? 

— Twilight in a great city! People drift by noiselessly along 
the gray side walks like shadows in a dream, with pallid still faces, 
and eyes as expressionless as empty thimbles. The sky looms up 
at the end of the streets between the dark silhouette of the build- 
ings, a greenish blue, pricked out here and there by a furtive star, 
and through the blue dusk electric signs strike the sight, blatant as 
sound. It is a lonely time, lonely as Death. 

— The state of health in San Francisco just now is becoming 
alarming, to those who know. The flu is stalking abroad again, in 
a form more virulent, we are told, than formerly. At one hospital 
alone there are thirty-five nurses down with it, and other hospitals 
report a similar percentage. In fact, there are not enough nurses 
to attend to the cases that are coming in every day. Show houses 
and dry goods stores are as crowded as ever, and no precautions 
are being taken to retard its spread. The streets are as dirty as 
they ever were, in spite of the promise of our lady supervisor that 
we are going to have a "clean-up day." The health authorities 
should get busy, and although we do not advocate the ugly and 
useless masks that disfigured humanity previously, we do advocate 
the people themselves staying at home when ill, and not attending 
public functions when not necessary. 

* * * 

— I often think if I were a boy again that the most inviting and 
romantic of callings to me would be that of the great engineer of 
' today, who carries in his hands, or rather in his brains, the des- 
tinies of peoples yet unborn and without whom modern life would 
speedily run back to the barbarian. And all of this is apropos of the 
meeting of irrigation leaders. San Francisco, when the Hetch- 
Hetchy is finished, will have something; so all down the line the 
small places are seeking shelter behind the skirts of the old lady by 
the Golden Gate. These irrigationists formerly hated the project, but 
now! . . . And above it all stands the figure of the engineer, 
M. M. O'Shaughnessy, through whose faith and tremendous persever- 
ance the work has been carried out. Of course, it is a foolish truism 
to say that the work of a real man is hardly ever recognized during 
his time. We know enough to see the value of this work but it is our 
descendants who will really feel it, and in time to come there is little 
doubt that the memory of O'Shaughnessy will stand out monu- 
mentally. And it is a fine mouthful of a name! 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 24, 1923 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




About the hardest thing which man has to face in his 
Freedom collective capacity is the question of freedom. How 

much should be allowed, how far should men be re- 
strained in the exercise of their own powers and the following out 
of their own dictates of will and conscience? Over and over again 
the question comes up in the course of human progress and repeat- 
edly it is answered wrongly by those in control ; or, if the govern- 
ing powers are too wise to yield to the subtle promptings of the 
devil of repression, by the mob. Yes, it is always the mob which 
clamors for the destruction of liberty; the mob which, unable to 
control itself, yet longs to get its dirty fingers upon the throat of 
others. They talk of the restraints of an aristocracy! These are as 
nothing compared with the violent tyrannies of the mob, that most 
damnable and irresponsible of all governments, which has been 
aptly termed an ochlocracy. An aristocracy may limit vulgarities, 
but to a ochlocracy belongs the shame of repressing refinements. 

And yet, difficult as the question may appear to be at first, it 
is in reality very easy, for the way to deal with freedom is to 
grant still more freedom; for the evils of freedom are self curative. 
Otherwise, you are in for an everlasting conflict which knows no 
end and has no solution. To attack the liquor problem from the 
point of view of an unlimited repression, because the liquor traffic 
is evil, leads to flagrant and destructive violation of the law and 
the growth of a drug habit, which is still more deleterious than the 
drink habit. To attack the drug habit by repressive measures and 
long terms of imprisonment is simply to endow it with the addi- 
tional charm of adventure and to send its profits sky-high so that 
it becomes a tempting venture so full of promise of gain as to 
destroy the ethical sense of numbers of people who would other- 
wise have refrained from it. Here are some of the implications of 
freedom which we may discuss further on a future occasion. 



"The Gods are thirsty," says Joseph Caillaix 
"Les Dieux Ont Soif" with that inimitable power of going right to 
the heart of things and expressing a concrete 
idea in concrete terms of which alone the French seem to have the 
secret. And the gods of adventure are thirsty because of the lot 
of new little nationalisms which were all aflame during the war and 
which have been kept aflame ever since by the antagonisms of the 
greater powers. Look at them, lying there in the heart of Central 
Europe and along the Eastern frontier, none of them of any use 
even to itself separately, and yet each was of great use to society 
as a whole in the old organization which war so ruthlessly destroyed. 

Never did they come into modern system, they were always hang- 
ing on the edge of life, as we know it, without courage or ability 
or education to take up anything on their own account. And they 
are still the same uneducated and undeveloped mass which has 
no volition of its own and no economic background. 

And so they form one of the most deadly dangers of interna- 
tional life today. Formerly under the control of the great European 
finance they developed manufactures and carried on a system of 
agriculture which tended to greater and greater modernity. Now, 
divorced from the powerful economic interests which formerly nursed 
them, they relapse into archaic methods of agriculture and have 
ceased to be in any sense industrial. Thus they threaten Europe 
with starvation because of the decrease in the amount of food prod- 
ucts. They also vastly diminish the demand for the industrial prod- 
ucts of England and the United States. One million and a half 
chronically unemployed in Great Britain is the echo of the down- 
fall of the European system. A gradually developing decline to the 



very verge of the re-conquest of the European continent by bar- 
barism is the price that has to be paid for a mistaken method of 
dealing with this question at the peace conference. The basis of 
life internationally speaking is neither racial nor lingual, it is eco- 
nomic. If one statesman in particular had recognized this how 
different it would all have been. 



What a funny document the new budget is and 
The State Budget what a lot of trouble it has caused already. No- 
body seems to know what is and who is respons- 
ible, but like a great liner the budget has come looming out of the 
fog of criticism and all the craft in the harbor have turned on their 
sirens in sheer alarm. 

Everybody fell with one accord on Mrs. Nellie Brewer Pierce and 
accused her of being of the deus ex machina, the instigator and 
indeed the constructor of this new engine. But Mrs. Pierce side- 
steps. She says that she is not responsible, indeed she is almost 
scornfully indifferent. "My job was merely to prepare the budget 
in accordance with instructions from the governor," she maintains, 
and adds, with a deliciously feminine touch, "I am not interested 
in criticism against the budget." 

And yet there is protest that rises constantly and increases per- 
petually in violence so that the whole political atmosphere at pres- 
ent is full of the pieces of furniture flung from the windows of the 
various state bureaus at this budget. From the state foresters to 
the head of the state department of education, there is one cry 
with one burden that their activities are threatened and that the 
state is on the verge of extinction through famine. 

None of this should be taken too seriously. There are serious 
objections in places to the budget, that may be conceded. The pro- 
cess followed in economizing is not all it should be and is often 
quite unintelligent, that also is true enough. But after all the budget 
does represent an effort to grapple with the serious peril of ex- 
travagance in the matter of the administration of the state govern- 
ment and is really deserving of careful consideration and quiet 
thought. We must not let ourselves be carried away by the clamor. 
Time and investigation will show both the weak and the strong 
points in the much discussed and much misunderstood budget. 



We have all been interested in the treatment 
The Veterans' Bureau accorded to those of our boys who went into 

the hell of the war and for whose welfare 
those of us who have any heart or any sensibility have had the 
greatest solicitude. The resignation of Col. Charles E. Forbes, who 
was at the head of the Veterans' Bureau, opens up the whole mat- 
ter and we are unpleasantly made aware that the administration 
of this governmental activity has been the object of almost con- 
stant attack ever since its institution. Charges of the most un- 
pleasant character have found their way into the press and the 
American Legion has been ceaselessly agitated about the affairs of 
the bureau. It is under investigation at the present time and much 
surprise has been expressed that Colonel Forbes should have chosen 
this particular time to resign. It does appear at first sight unfor- 
tunate, but he doubtless has his own good and sufficient reasons, and 
no unpleasant deductions should be drawn from the fact itself. 

But it will be noted that all of these bureaus which tend to min- 
ister to the needs of ex-service men and of the wounded and dis- 
abled are at some time or another exposed to the most violent at- 
tacks, so that it would seem as if the government were accused of 
actually exploiting those whom it is in reality shielding. And this 



February 24. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



criticism is by no means confined to this time or to this country. 
At the close of the Civil war and for years afterwards, practically 
the same charges were hurled at the same sort of governmental 
activities. Sometimes they had some truth, but more often none at 
all. And abroad as well as here the same occurs. The British in- 
stitutions are criticised in a similar fashion and those of France 
and Italy are not exempt. Even the struggling relief societies of 
Germany face the same storm of indignant detraction. How then 
is it? The answer would seem to be that the state of mind of 
these sufferers renders them so sensitive to real or imaginary griev- 
ances that it is very difficult to conduct an institution on their be- 
half. And this very weakness renders their complaints more readily 
believed by the public — which reasons but little. 



Amendment Enables 
City to Operate Car L'nes 



It is of great interest to the citizens of 
San Francisco to know that Charter 
Amendment "53," which was passed by 
an overwhelming majority at the last elec- 
tion, has been ratified by the Legislature at Sacramento, was signed 
by Governor Richardson on January 24, and became a part of the 
laws of California on that date. The passage of Charter Amendment 
"53" at the November election by nearly a two to one vote was the 
outstanding feature of that election. 

Charter Amendment "53" was an enabling act to make possible 
the unification of our street car lines under city ownership by having 
the city take over the lines of the Market Street Railway Company, 
the purchase price of this property to be paid for out of the earnings. 
The unification of the street car lines, which is only possible by the 
city taking over the privately-owned properties, must be the initial 
step before we can hope for better street car transportation. With a 
unified system we could immediately get the benefits such as better 
service on existing lines, direct routes, through cars, free transfers 
and street car extensions wherever needed. 

It would mean that our city could go ahead and grow. It would 
mean that those who are in business in San Francisco could live 
where they make their living and not be compelled to live across the 
Bay or down the Peninsula. 

The present is the best time for the city to purchase the lines of 
the Market Street Railway Company. It must be borne in mind that 
should be city delay the purchase until the franchises begin to expire, 
the city would be confronted then with raising the money by general 
taxation to pay for the properties, and the earnings of the properties 
up to the time of the expiration of the franchises would be lost to 
the city. 



— We have been having one of our crime storms during the last 
few weeks, a regular walpurgis-nacht of disorder and murder. The 
most insolent robberies have been committed in plain daylight, 
stores have been entered and robbed, banks invaded and robbed, 
whole groups of men and women in restaurants have been held up 
and robbed of all that they had about them, a theater was entered 
in broad morning and the safe robbed; in. fact the record of local 
life is about as wild and uncertain as can be conceived. How are 
we to account for these aberrations of large numbers of men at 
certain times? Punishment is no remedy. Queen Elizabeth hanged 
40,000 people without producing any even fair results. There must 



LADIES AND THE LAW 

Women arc slopping into legal prominence with great rapidity 
these days, almost jazzing into it, in fact. Mrs. Schwab in the city 
attorney's office, and now Miss Alma M. Myers in the office of as- 
sistant-deputy to the United States District Attorney. Both of them 
are very able women and one of them at least, as the Town Crier 
knows, is as gentle and kindly as she is able. But after all, women 
district attorneys, if they must exist, and we suppose that they must, 
are better employed in the office-business of the position than in 
court. We had a very able woman at the federal office some time 
back, so able indeed that she was transferred to Washington. With- 
out wishing to appear unkind we can state quite plainly that her re- 
moval from the federal court here was hailed with universal joy. She 
was the most hated official who had been in the post office building 
for many years and mere men shivered, partly with fear and partly 
with disgust in her presence. There are certain relieving amenities in 
the arduous practice of the law, and these are foreign to women as a 
rule, and the exceptions are very few. We have spoken about women 
as lawyers; now let us look at one woman who is in the public eye 
and holds the immediate destiny of this state in her hands to a cer- 
tain extent. I mean Mrs. Nellie Pierce of the State Board of Control. 
There is no doubt about her ability — the ruthlessness of her budget 
is enough to establish that. She is able, but in a diabolical sort of a 
way which one does not care to associate with women at least. And 
yet it is not the devilishness of her ability that is the saddening and 
disillusioning thing about her performances so far. It is a sort of 
hardness, a kind of brittleness which takes no account of life and its 
amenities. There, again, women seem to fall down, this time in poli- 
tics as above said in law. Even in the sternest men there is that recog- 
nition of a sort of humanity as it were; an underlying kindliness 
which was even found in Bismarck. But our clever women, God help 
them (they need no blessing) are as hard as the nether millstone and 
just as meticulous. Girls who really instinctively know things, always 
hate a woman superior. We have often wondered why. Now we 
know and soon the community will know too. 



"Y" EMPLOYMENT BUREAU DOES GOOD WORK 

San Francisco faces no serious unemployment problem in the 
opinion of George H. DeKay, head of the employment department 
of the San Francisco Y. M. C. A. DeKay reaches this conclusion 
on the strength of daily experience that puts him in touch with 
scores of employers and men seeking work. 

He says that good activity in building and mechanical lines is 
caring for many men and keeping San Francisco from unemploy- 
ment problems. Last month the "Y" employment bureau found 
jobs for 125 men. 

Greater attention is to be paid by the San Francisco Y. M. C. A. 
to the welfare of the employed boy and a still better program of 
recreational, intellectual and religious work is to be arranged for 
his benefit. 



— Workers in street manholes for telephone and electric con- 
duits, sewers, gas and water mains often encounter irrespirable at- 
mospheres due to leakage of artificial or natural gas, sewer gas 
or gases caused by electrolysis. Inquiries received by the Bureau of 
Mines and conferences between engineers who have to deal with 
manholes and members of the bureau have disclosed the need at 
be some natural explanation of the phenomenon in terms of which times of respiratory protection for workers in manholes. It is planned 
a modern community can act and save itself. Here is a job worth to secure samples of contaminated air from manholes and to test 
while for some of our scientists. It is almost as useful to be able hose masks in them. Recommendations for protection of workers 
to control crime as to know the exact distance from here to Betel- in manholes will be published. This experimental work is being con- 
geuse ducted at the Pittsburgh, Pa., experiment station of the bureau. 



— Palestine contains the deepest valley, which is between 
and 1400 feet below sea level. 



1300 — A Japanese scientist asserts he has made synthetic petroleum 

out of fish oil and clay. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 24, 1923 



The Ranch of the Witch's Head J 

By ELEANORE F. ROSS 1 




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CHAPTER V. 

THE worst, then, was over in the way of unpleasant information. 
This was the house, not the barn. There was, indeed, no barn; 
only a ramshackle shed, down the hill, near the well, a tumble- 
down lean-to which could possibly shelter chickens until something 
better could be built; a stunted, ancient orchard, a cleared space 
of a few acres, covered now with wild grass, and surrounding all, 
the dense, dark, seemingly impenetrable forest. 

The last load of the furniture had come, the big van and car- 
riage had both departed. Mama threw open the front door with 
a flourish, and we all went in. We sat for awhile among our as- 
sembled household goods as people will, who do not at first, know 
just what to begin on. We had Luke and another man to direct 
in getting settled, and there was Maggie to see to the kitchen stove 
and other things in her particular domain. 

We girls wandered rather aimlessly from room to room, hardly 
believing that we were expected to call this place "home." Why, 
our big barn in Belmont was a palace compared to this shack! 
How out of place and alien seemed our rather elegant furnishings! 
What a task to get this awful mix-up into anything like order! 
What sort of a fix had the "restless foot" led us into this time? 

And then, looking at Mama's tired face, flushed and excited, at 
Maggie's grim with disgust, at Charlie's, anxious, with an anxiety 
so far beyond his years, and Percie's, with his pathetic baby trust 
in all the world, we suddenly, simultaneously, felt our "sporting 
blood" arise, and all pitched in with a will. 

I can remember how we laughed when we tried to close the 
folding doors between the "parlor" and the front bedroom, and a 
rain of nut shells came down upon our heads from the opening in 
the ceiling. "Them pesky squirrels!" explained the hired man, busi- 
ly laying the matting in what was to be our bed-room. Virgie 
tacked a portierre on the wall, threw another over her couch, and 
placed the Japanese screen effectively near. As usual, she had suc- 
ceeded in producing an Oriental effect. Fannie and I were dust- 
ing the furniture and unpacking toilet cases, and laying our clothes 
neatly in the bureau drawers. Mama and Maggie had settled the 
other rooms, while the parlor was left till the last. 



After a supper which had been cooked and packed in the town, 
we all sat on the back porch and watched the sun set behind the 
pines, and the young moon brighten as night came on. Tired, 
sleepy, home-sick, we sat silently; listening to Luke and the boys, 
who were down near the cow-shed. Our cows (a big red one, and 
a lovely little Jersey, each with calves), had been milked, and the 
sight and taste of that new milk, frothing in a bright pail, put more 
interest in the prospect of ranching. 

It was Virgie who suddenly spoke. "It is the image of a witch's 
head," she said slowly. 

We all started. An eerie stillness was settling over the world. 
The boys had wandered down the road, too far away for us to 
hear their chatter. The last glow was fading in the west; from out 
of the dark line of woods back of the house, came queer, hushed 
rustlings, and calls that we suburban people had never heard before. 
The hoot of an owl. flying near, made us jump nervously, though 
owls were well known to us in old Belmont. A little, sighing, sweet 
smelling wind came breathing out of the forest. 

We looked at Virgie, expectantly. She pointed to a huge oak, 
standing against the sky, nearly covering the out-buildings from 
sight, at the foot of the slope. "Don't you see?" she said, still 
pointing, "there's her long, hooked nose, her chin turned up, nearly 
meeting it, her wild eye, her peaked cap, — " 

We all looked intently. Out of the blackness of the giant oak, 
a wierd profile was beginning to form, and what had seemed to 
us at first just an irregularly shaped, spreading tree, became the 
ghostly features of an old witch's head. Her cap seemed to trem- 
ble in the wind, her mouth worked in unheard mutterings, her bale- 
ful eye glared! 

Maggie growled something about "getting out the bye's night 
clothes." Mama gave Virgie a tragically scornful glance, and swept 
into the house. We three girls remained staring, fascinated. "That 
will be the name of this ranch," said Virgie; "The Ranch of the 
Witch's Head." 

(To be continued.) 



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cAcademy 

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Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 



Enroll Now in 



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A course in the above makes you in- 
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San Francisco 

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VISIT 



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Catacombs" 

AT 

CYPRESS LAWN 
CEMETERY 

City Office: 

995 Market St. 

San Francisco 

PHONES: SUTTER 695 

DOUGLAS 4772 



February 24. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




IMtf 'da/at at* f 

— There was an exodus of our great ones to Los Angeles the other 
day to see about the university mess. The list was about as brilliant 
and important as we could muster, including erudite literati and bab- 
bling high finance, not as grammatical as might be, but forceful to 
the nth degree. The former was a cover for the latter, for if Los 
Angeles is to be persuaded to change the error of its ways finance 
will talk a great deal louder than any words can speak, whether 
weasel or angel words. That accounts for the presence of so many 
in the delegation whose early opportunities have been slight but 
whose later acquisitions are beyond cavil. One look at the financial 
power of these and Los Angeles will wilt. The professors are taken 
along, like the Golden Bear Quartet, for the mere purposes of mak- 
ing a noise. But the real work will be done in deadly silence, marked 
only by the choking gasps of former Iowans. But why is it all? Since 
when did it happen that a university was of such importance to the 
governing interests, and why should the proposal of two years' addi- 
tional study at Los Angeles cause such perturbation in high circles? 

— Only just wait long enough and almost anything is bound to 
happen. For example, there is P. H. McCarthy, who has played the 
fox so long that it appeared as if the trail would never lead to his 
lair. And now the hounds are in full cry and McCarthy, erstwhile 
mayor, hears the winding of the huntsman's horn which means his 
death as a leader. And yet this last frolic which has landed him is 
perhaps one of his most innocent. It is not bad morals, on the face 
of it, to take money for the purpose of propaganding a legitimate 
fight, and the fight of those who hired McCarthy was, at least, legiti- 
mate. But to sell one's influence in a labor body for $10,000, that 
is different. McCarthy loses. But where is the moral ? To rise from a 
carpenter for the old California Theater on Bush street to own a 
great house and much wealth is not very discouraging to the labor 
skate of the future. No, considering the breed of the animal, Mc- 
Carthy realized pretty well on his hide. We were going to say "his 
soul," but don't let us be ridiculous. 

— It would be interesting to know who and what is at the bottom 
of all this agitation for a hospital for addicts and why just at this 
particular time our city should have been chosen as the center for a 
movement against the use of narcotics, and why again should we 
be forever held up to the world as the city of drug addicts par excel- 
lence? I don't really for a moment think that such is the case, and I 
am of the opinion that no evidence can be produced to prove it. 
Yet we seem to be saddled with the burden of a particularly vicious 
taste in drugs and a particularly nasty appetite for their consumption. 
The Hearst papers have taken upon themselves the responsibility for 
this particular crusade and ought to be able to furnish the proofs for 
the existence of their propaganda. We don't say they don't have 
them, but we do say that they have not produced them and, there- 
fore, until such proofs are forthcoming we must refuse to be dragged 
into sympathy with an agitation which does not seem to rest upon 
any stronger foundation than the fact that there is a perceptible in- 
crease in the percentage of people who from time immemorial have 

used drugs to their own detriment. 

* * * 

— Garrett W. Mclnerney has been combining with certain other 
notables in the East among whom we note William H. Taft, in draw- 
ing up a set of rules for the conduct of judges all through the coun- 
try. It makes the Town Crier feel very important for only a few 
weeks ago you were told in these columns that judges needed bracing 



up a bit. But, like all rules, they are rather impossible of carrying 
out. For example, judges are told to keep out of politics. Under 
present conditions that is absurd, and if they did so they would no 
longer be useful to groups of earnest and ethical lawyers who are as 
anxious as can be about the moral superiority of the bench. Never- 
theless, these same moral lawyers and ethical pontiffs are not above 
bringing political influence to bear on those judges from whom they 
have demanded abstention from politics. So that while we are im- 
pressed with all this ethical garrulity, we are still constrained to put 
our tongues in our cheeks. Talk about Roman augurs not daring to 
look at one another for fear of laughter! Why our legal augurs have 
grown far beyond that stage of sensitiveness ! 
» * * 

— So the Drys are at it again and have chosen the Merchants Ex- 
change Club as the place of their most recent activities. With all 
due deference to the law of the land, the operatives of the bureau 
of social tyranny which masquerades under the disguise of social 
virtue, disregards and violates every canon of decency. The prohibi- 
tion officers knew, or at least they should have known, that no viola- 
tion of the strict letter of the law would occur in the particular club 
and that if any liquor was there it was there as the private property 
of individual members and not as the property of the club. Now, 
our pockets are not our own, one judge having ruled that trousers 
are a vehicle of transportation. Our lockers at home and in the club 
are not our own, but can be entered at any time without warrant. 
Evidence, however, obtained and in contravention even of constitu- 
tional rights, can be used to convict! In short, as regards freedom 
of person and property we have thrown over every vestige of our 
Anglo Saxon heritage and are one with the Latin and the Slav. 



In Great Britain the war department is substituting motor trac- 
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will enable the government to make a 10 per cent reduction in 
the personnel. 



1 Only 9 Out 
I of 100 Men 




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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 24, 1923 



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Traveling in High 



By FARRAND LEWYS 



JaagBlgiaii lMiiiMMMigtgiBiigsrff iff sa- ht-Ss g g 5 gggigggg's g gygg r^i;;!! XSS *.~ SS Ss igaggSsISBHIs-SSBSS 



AS REGARDS automobiles, I am like the man who said he 
could recognize two tunes — one was the "Star Spangled Ban- 
ner" and the other wasn't. I know when an automobile is a Ford, 
and when it isn't. That's about the extent of my motor knowledge. 
There is a distinctive air about a Ford that places it in a class 
by itself. They always look to me as if they were standing on their 
tip-toes, and no matter how shabby and dusty and deranged they 
are, there is a happy, devil-may-care look about them. And an- 
other thing I've discovered about Fords — there are always more 
children in them than in other cars! 

So, taking into consideration my utter ignorance along the lines 
of automobiles, when I stepped into the huge auditorium, and viewed 
the glittering array of cars parked there, I had to admit that at 
first sight, they all looked alike to me. They shone like mirrors; 
it would seem almost a sacrilege to get into one — so spick and 
span, and just-turned-out-from-the-factory they appeared; some 
decorated with all shades of ribbons, in long bands and big bows, 
and attended by "colored gentlemen" who rubbed them down from 
time to time, as if they were horses, and flicked off the slightest 
speck of dust, whenever it flecked their polished surfaces. 1 stood 
for a moment, absorbing the wonderful decorations, trying to figure 
out what connection the Orient had with the "horse-less carriage." 

"There was no special reason for the scheme of decoration," I 
was told, when I inquired of some salesman near, "unless it might 
be that San Francisco was the nearest American city to China ; 
that we had the biggest 'China-town' here, that no other city had 
ever adopted the Oriental idea, and of course, San Francisco al- 
ways was unique in the way she carried things out." 

I told him my mission. Could be give me some pointers? In 
what way did this show differ from others in the past? Well, he 
was a very poor hand at that sort of thing; but Mr. Berger over 
there, that man in a light hat, with his arms folded, he might tell 
me something of interest. I went over to the man in the light hat; 
but he referred me to someone way up the other end of Van Ness, 
so I rambled on toward the Cadillac exhibit. Those cars drew me 
like a magnet; and I immediately lost my heart to a seven-pas- 
senger Sedan, the price of which was $9000. It was a lovely dark 
rose color; or was it terra cotta? A cute little silver figure, like 
the figurehead on the bow of a ship, perched high in front; I was 
told that all the seats folded flat, and it could be used to sleep 
in, if necessary; it had long, elegant, sweeping lines; it was an 
aristocrat among the other cars. 

I noticed that none of the Cadillacs had the new disc wheels. 
Why was that? Well, the salesman thought it was because they 
weren't so good-looking as the wooden or steel-spoked wheels. 
Weren't they going to use them at all? Not so far as he knew. 
Ah! here was another beautiful car! It was called a Town Car, 
for milady to go shopping in. There was a lovely toilet case in 
front, with everything in it, from mirror to comb; this case alone 
cost $300. Everything about these cars spelled Money with capi- 
tals. 

I passed on among avenues of cars of all makes and stopped 
at a Kissel Old English coach sedan, the lines of which remind one 
vividly of some ancient coach of "early Victorian" days; you 
could see it with galloping horses, lurching along some English high- 
way, with cracking of whips, and jingling of silver plated harness; 
the trunk racks on top loaded with the baggage of some noble- 
man's family; traveling from one country estate, perhaps, to an- 



other in Devonshire county? I went on in a sort of dream, until 
I came to the Chandler-Cleveland exhibit. This was an interesting 
record which they had made for themselves in San Francisco. In 
1919, they sold five cars; in 1920, 72 cars; in 1921, 97 cars; in 
1922, 290 cars, and for 1923, they expected to sell 500 cars! 
They had already sold 58 automobiles for this year; 40 in Janu- 
ary, and 18 up to the present, during February. "Of course," I 
was told, "no other car came up to the Cleveland or Chandler!" 
"Of course not," I agreed, and went on. 

The Chevrolet, which seems to be a sort of cousin to the Ford, 
next drew my attention. It had the family characteristic of stand- 
ing on its toes. The Chevrolet man was more friendly than the 
other salesmen; he seemed quite willing to discuss the virtues of 
his cars, which were all equipped with disc wheels. Yes, disc wheels 
were the best; it was next to impossible to get them out of true; 
after a jolt they sprang back again into place; they were more 
durable than the spoked wheel; did not, of course, have the fault 
of loosening in dry climates, like a wheel with wooden spokes; 
and they cost only from $35 to about $47 more than the spoked 
wheels; they had been used in Europe for years. And he ended 
with: "For an all-round car, you can't beat the Chevrolet!" "No 
doubt about that," I answered, and wandered into the Buick ex- 
hibit. 

Being a woman, I noticed at once a big sign with the following 
information upon it: "With a woman driver, the Buick Four Coupe 
established new San Francisco to Portland run of 22 hours, 43 min- 
utes." That certainly was dandy! I would like to have met her! 
She might have "loosened up," and told me a few things about 
automobiles! Never did I see salesmen so chary about discussing 
their wares! "We do not want to conflict with the other exhibits, 
you know," they invariably told me; "it wouldn't be ethical." 

I approached the Buick salesman. The Buicks themselves did 
not look very different from any of the other automobiles. 

Perhaps he could tell me something startling. 1 had noticed the 
closed car seemed to predominate in this show. Were they becom- 
ing more popular than the touring car, even in "sunny California?" 
Yes, and all over the country people were buying the closed car 
in preference to the open. The permanent top costs more, of course, 
but it could be opened up like the touring top in warm weather, 
and was naturally a great advantage in stormy weather. "But open 
or closed, there is no car that can beat the Buick!" 

The parrot which is a conspicuous feature of the Nash exhibit 
caught my eye, and I stood for awhile watching it. This time in- 
stead of having to go all the way to meet a salesman, I found to 
my astonishment that the salesman was approaching me. Could 
he do anything for me? Yes, he could tell me something about the 
show; was it like all auto shows? Wasn't there something the least 
bit different from former exhibits? 

Well, that was a question. It differed in one way, at least; all 
these cars on exhibition were standard cars; there were no specially 
built cars, that he knew of, in the whole show; they all came out 
of the regular stock. Then, too, there seemed to be an unusually 
friendly spirit among all the exhibitors; no one wanted to out-do 
the other; everything was harmonious for the time being, ("and 
at best, you know," he said, "it is a cut-throat business ordinar- 
ily!") 

Did I notice the rug that the Lafayette chassis was on? That 
(Continued on page 9) 



February 24. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



iwwwhmww^jimww^^ 




Is Europe Saving Herself? 



By R. BERKELEY 

iCit :! :r a a ;i itji jf :t :::::: :i ;t :; :: :: ,: :: :; :: :; :: it :; :r :: :: y. :i 



NEVER tired of pitying Europe, unable to sustain five minutes 
without some allusion to her forlorn condition, it is a pity 
that we cannot spare a few minutes to pitying ourselves for our 
disappearing ideals and our growing materialism. Prosperity, as 
the only test of happiness, is too much in our mouths. Because 
Europe is poor in money, she has in our opinion, it would seem, 
lost all that makes life worth living. 

In material wealth Europe may be poor. In real wealth she is 
richer than ever before war chastened her. I make no exceptions. 
How, you say, can France, anyhow, be said to be the better for 
the fiery trials of the trenches? Has she not an empty treasury? 
Must I remind you so soon that I am not measuring wealth in 
terms of material possessions? France is healthier, therefore wealth- 
ier, than for a score of years. She is showing it today in that action 
of hers that is rousing every jackal of the Stinnes press to action. 
She is showing by her wonderful restraint in the Ruhr district that 
she is animated by no spirit of hate, that against the German na- 
tion she harbors no feeling of enmity, that she is animated by no 
desire less worthy than to deal justly and generously by Germany's 
suffering people. She might have taken with her fighting army 
an army of French workers to man the mines, factories and rail- 
roads, displacing the natives. What did she do? She undertook to 
keep every German workman in full employment at higher wages 
and under better conditions that he had ever known before. Even 
when, misled by appeals to their patriotism issued by a government 
acting under the instructions of the industrial magnates, they downed 
tools, their jobs were kept open for them as long as was possible. 
Most of these jobs are still open. In every way the German peo- 
ple are receiving the utmost consideration. France has learned the 
lesson that peoples are not by any means responsible for the actions 
of their rulers, and the far more important lesson that a nation 
has nothing to gain and has everything to lose by imitating the 
brutalities of its erstwhile conquerors, when its hour of triumph 
dawns. She is setting an example to all the world, in the method 
of her administration of a fraudulent debtor's property. And what 
is the home picture? In those areas where every mile bears traces 
of the foul deeds of the Hun, humble sons of the soil are working 
1"6 to 18 hours out of each 24, plowing fields soaked not so long 
ago with their brothers' and fathers' blood, with songs on their lips, 
striving manfully to forget the horrors those fields have witnessed; 
are endeavoring to recreate the happy villages where scarce one 
brick remains on another, living meanwhile in old dug-outs and dark 
cellars. It is a wonderful sight for those who are able to witness it. 

What of Belgium? Were not her sufferings enough to rouse in 
her people an insatiable thirst for revenge? The mere thought of 
the things that were done to her people stirs fresh feelings of nausea. 
Yet she, too, is working, as even she h.is never worked before, 
willing to forget and forgive on the least sign of repentance and 
honesty of intention from her ravagcrs. The suffering lies deep, 
whole families of friends missing from nearly every hearth, but it 
is borne in silence. Rarely do you hear reparations discussed: all 
the talk is of reconstruction schemes, new social services. 

Italy, too! Few Italian soldiers are able to forget the cries of 
their women behind the German trenches, but they try to believe 
that human nature will never sink so low again, that a new era is 
in reality established. Would it have been possible to imagine a 
bloodless revolution so soon after .my ot the previous great wars 
in history? A revolution of the best elements of the population 



against the worst, bringing in its train settled finances, reconcilia- 
tion with the Vatican, a saner governmental policy than Italy has 
known for a generation. 

Even Austria, burning with indignation at the despoiling to which 
she has been compelled to submit, as the price of her Prussianizing, 
has agreed to let the dead past bury its dead, and accept the help- 
ing hand of Czecho-Slovakia, the little state responsible for the 
scheme of rehabilitation that has been recently carried through. It 
is the hardest thing in the world to accept favors from your deadly 
enemy in the hour of his triumph! 

Look at all the little states of Central Europe, also. Is it not 
wonderful that these untamed peoples, entrusted with self-govern- 
ment after centuries of enslavement, are shaping their destinies sob- 
erly, making alliances, commercial and political, instead of being 
engaged — as was so freely prophecied — in never-ending scrapping? 
Bitter enmities and jealousies still are there, but they are being 
kept under. 

And England, mother of mine? I was with her people through 
the war; have been there since. I shared her travail, partook of her 
joy. I know how she felt towards every son of Germany; the ter- 
rible holocaust of her mothers, wives and daughters there would 
have been, had the enemy effected a landing — shot in cold blood 
by fathers, husbands, brothers, that there should be no repetition 
of the deeds done in Belgium. Yet she is learning to turn the other 
cheek, ready to forego every cent of reparations from her foe, to 
forgive every ally her debt. She has surely saved her soul. 

What does the average man who criticizes and "pities" Europe 
know of European races and the history of the last thousand years? 
If he could be induced to make even a superficial study of the sub- 
ject, he would be on his knees thanking Providence for the miracles 
that are happening. Chaos there was, chaos there still is, but through 
its murkiest depths rays of light are treading their way, the darkest 
corners illuminated by the spirit of service, patiently borne suffer- 
ing, sacrifice, vision, sympathy, the larger hope. Universal brother- 
hood is far from a realization, but it is more than a dream, and 
they are blind indeed who cannot see this. 

Those brothers of ours, they have not died in vain. 



THE NEW STUTZ TOURING CAR 

In our issue of last week, which devoted several pages to illus- 
trating the models of the 1923 automobiles in the show at the audi- 
torium, the price given the Stutz five passenger touring car was 
$1518.95. It should have been $1995. factory. This car is a new 
model and at the price of $1995 will attract attention. Bert Latham 
is the agent, and has new quarters at 928 Van Ness avenue. 

TRAVELING IN HIGH (Continued from page 8) 
rug had been contributed for the show by a local antiquarian; 
the peace pact in Europe had been signed on that rug, and it was 
valued at $100,000! All the rugs in fact, in the Nash show, had 
had some sort of history attached to them; and did I notice the 
chassis itself? That chassis had been stripped by the boys in the 
local shop, instead of being sent already stripped from the East- 
ern factories as all the other chassis were. They were mighty proud 
of that chassis. 

"But let me tell you one thing," said he impressively; "There is 
no automobile that can come up to the Nash automobiles!" 

"I should say not!" said I. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 24, 1923 




ByKEM 

THE SEVEN AGES OF WOMEN by Compton Mackenzie— Pub- 
lished by Stokes. Price $2. 

Compton Mackenzie divides his heroine's life up in seven parts 

in his new novel. She is an English girl with a French rearing and 

the reader gets acquainted with her first as an infant — then the 

girl stage — the maiden from twenty till her marriage — the wife — 

the mother, the widow and the grandmother. It is the fashion now 

to have the heroine reach us in sections rather than to burst full 

bloomed upon the gaze as the Goddess Minerva did from the brow 

of Jupiter, but it is a fashion that does not please the average 

reader who harks back to Plasher's Mead and some of his earlier 

novels with more enthusiasm. But this more serious work together 

with ALTAR STEPS, also by Compton Mackenzie, which came 

out last fall, shows that like many other writers he is doing as 

H. G. Wells prophesied English writers would do — viz., "writing 

differently." 

* * * 

THE MOUNTAIN SCHOOL TEACHER, by Melville Davisson 

Post — Published by Appleton Company. Price $1.50. 

This is a modern American story, written in an entirely different 
vein than the splendid detective stories with which we usually asso- 
ciate the author. Like well-known English authors, he also now elects 
to write "differently," and in this present-day story gives an allegory 
from the life of Christ. It belongs in the sweet, satisfying, unique 
book class. One correspondent wrote about it: "I read it several 
weeks ago, and the feeling of reassurance and peace it brought is 
still with me. I have never in all my searching for the divine realities 
found anything so conclusively satisfying. Yet why? The story does 
not preach, does not reprove; none the less it impresses its message, 
reveals the cristos that is in each one of us but so seldom realized 
and attained as was the case of this school teacher, coming in the 
midst of common things, taking up the burdens of life and making 
them beautiful with sympathy." 

This is certainly getting to be more and more the day of the elderly 
heroine. She moves before us prettily and pathetically in the VEHE- 
MENT FLAME, by Margaret Deland. She fascinates us as well as 
the young man in Robert Hichen's DECEMBER LOVE. She more 
than intrigues us as completely rejuvenated according to modern sci- 
entific recipes she stands up before us eyeing us through opera 
glasses in Gertrude Atherton's BLACK OXEN (just out this month). 
Nor is the elderly man hero not without honor, as Steve Benet in- 
forms us in a recent speech at the National Arts Club. He said he 
could foresee "a tremendous boom in courtly, white-bearded heroes 
following in the wake of Robert Nathan's AUTUMN — a strong flurry 
in polar beavers, to adopt the slang of a recent obnoxious game. The 
great adventure of the novel of tomorrow will not be a question of 
sex but of diet — the tragedy of the nonagenarian." 

THE DIM LANTERN by Temple Bailey, a story that has un- 
ceasing interest for them, viz., the charming young girl who has , 
the chance to choose between the suitor with an accumulation of 
money and years and the attractive young soldier-hero minus nerves 
and fortune. The story-telling gift of Temple Bailey makes a sat- 
isfying, much sought for novel out of this well worn theme. — Penn 
Pub. Co., $2. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON, by William Roscoe Thayer, and THE 
REAL LINCOLN, by Weik, recently published by Houghton Mifflin 
Company. Price $3. 

Both substantial books and will be read by the more substantial 
readers on the strength of their names. The publishers hold out the 
following bait, presumably for feminine attention, under the caption 
"UNLUCKY AT LOVE"— "People are still speculating why it was so 
many of the young women whom Washington took a fancy to chilled 
and drew back when it came to a question of marriage. One very 
clever writer, says Mr. Thayer, thinks perhaps that his nose was un- 
usually large in his youth, and that repelled them. Mr. Weik points 
out in his REAL LINCOLN, Lincoln's early infatuation for three dif- 
ferent young women and with what seeming hesitation he finally 
married his fourth choice." 

DUSK OF MOONR1SE by Diana Patrick, is a romantic English 
.story in the best seller class with Margaret Pedler and Ethel M. 
Dell, though told by an author with a style all her own. Many 
of the descriptions of the Bronte country, the scene of the novel, 
are very beautiful, and delights the memory as well as the lovely 
heroine, June Tempest, who was "different" as her sister Ruby 
maintained, "with her reserve — her spasms of odd talkativeness — 
the queer, dry books she read — and with all her innocent-seeming 
. . . she led chaps on — and then she flouted them." In fact she 
took Ruby's lover without any "stepping-out together" prelimin- 
inaries. Romance and humor combined, and a hero who is also 
"different" makes this attractive light vacation reading. — E. P. Dut- 
ton. Price $2. 









o 










»/ i- 





NOTICE 
HTb consumers 
ofElectricity 



The Pacific Gas and Electric Company announces a general reduction 
in the schedules of rates for Electric Lighting service, averaging 1 1 Vz% 
for all classes of service effective February 20, 1923. 

A corresponding reduction has been granted to those who use Elec- 
tricity for Power, Heating and Cooking. A letter has been sent to 
these consumers enclosing Rate Schedules and explaining Optional 
Rates. These consumers should select the schedule desired for their 
service and notify the company at once. 

All users of Electricity are invited to call at any P G and E office and 
secure a copy of the new Rate Schedules which apply in their respec- 
tive communities. Any questions regard- 
ing the new rates will be gladly explained, 

5-223, "~ 

PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 




During 1922, 
three reduc- 
tions in rates 
for Gas were 
made, averag- 
ing approxi- 
mately llVi% 
reduction for 
all sections ser- 
*1 ved by this f"^ 
\ company / 



P.G. and E. 



"PACIFIC SERVICE" 

The Miehtiest Servant in California 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

239 Post Street San Francisco 



February 24. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 




Have You Heard It? 



EGYPT AND THE CROMWELL ROAD 

(The Tomb of Tutenlchamun) 

A beggar walked in front of me, 
In ribboned rags, disastrously; 

Mopping the puddled rain with pads 
Long worn in guttered Iliads. 

Halting, with eyes downcast, intent 
Upon the splashing stones he went. 

He heard me, and with lifted head 
Waited my coming, as I said. 

To ask an alms; but, as he turned. 
His eyes with distant glory burned. 

He did not ask an alms; he held 
A finger up, and I was spelled. 

He did not ask an alms; he said, 
"The ancient honors all are sped. 

"The ancient honors all are gone 
"That founded Rome and Babylon. 

"These rags were once Arabia's boast; 
"I was a king, and am a ghost. 

"The lifting of my hand was doom; 
"In Egypt they have found my tomb." 

He went, a beggar man again, 
Into the shadows and the rain. 

— John Drinkwater. 



TOMBE DES ANGLAIS 

(Some of our unknown warriors lie in one large grave in the 
forest between Soissons and Villers-Cotterets, at a crossroads 
called Rond de le Reine. This grave, which is known as "Tombe 
des Anglais," is beautifully tended by a French family of Villers- 
Cotterets, and is railed round to keep the deer from trampling it.) 

Sleep, in this forest plot. 

Unknown for ever. 
Though France forgetteth not 

Your last endeavor. 
Your own shall find the spot 

Never, ah, never! 

Sun on the forest wide, 

But not for your seeing, 
Nor how down each green ride 

Red deer go fleeing. 
Bright youth, a martyr died, 

France, in thy freeing. 

Boyhood's scarce conscious breath 

Cheerfully given — 
None to record each death. 

How each had striven — 
Greater love no man hath 

This side of Heaven. 

— Hagar Paul. 



iBHlHillSKiBlHHHHBBiaSllBlBHEaHBlHagaHBaiKBiWBBiHliHiai 

— The late Dr. Lane, the great mental specialist, used to tell an 
amusing story against himself. Some repairs were being done at the 
private asylum run by Dr. Lane and the workmen engaged on the job 
had been warned that on no account were they to talk to any of the 
patients. One morning Dr. Lane went to see how the workmen were 
getting on, and he made one or two suggestions to the foreman, but 
all he got in reply was a stony stare. He repeated his remarks, 
which the man again treated with silent contempt. Naturally, Dr. 
Lane lost his temper and asked the man what he meant by such con- 
duct. "Awa' wi' ye, ye delirious ould deevil,' was the retort; "I canna 
be bothered wi' ye. But I'm sorry for ye a' the same." Dr. Lane 
found he had been mistaken for one of his patients. 
* # * 

— A prominent advocate and lecturer on temperance was visiting 
a country town, and while out for a ramble one morning he began 
to feel thirsty and called at a local soft drink parlor to refresh him- 
self. He found his way round to the saloon bar, and there demanded 
of the goddess presiding a glass of milk. The girl in question, who 
happened to recognize him, turned round to execute his order, and 
after winking to some of her regular customers poured in a jigger 
of whisky. "How much is this?" he inquired. "Ten cents," was the 
reply. He tasted it, and finding it good, drained the glass. "That's 
splendid," he said, smacking his lips, "I'll have another." The girl 
repeated the dose, and he finished that off as well. "How much am I 
in your debit now?" he inquired. "Only ten cents," replied the girl. 
He laid the money on the counter, and as he turned away he was 
heard to mutter, "Some cow; some cow!" 

— An amusing story used to be told concerning a well-known uni- 
versity professor who took a great deal of interest in the woman's 
suffrage campaign and was once persuaded to carry a banner in a 
parade. His wife observed him marching with a dejected air and 
carrying his banner so that it hung limply, and later she reproved 
him severely for not making a better show. "My dear," said he, "did 
you see what was on the banner? It read, 'Any man can vote. Why 
can't I?' " 

— A certain young lawyer had opened an office on his own ac- 
count, and on the first day sat waiting for clients. Presently he 
heard a step outside and a man's figure was silhouetted against the 
ground glass of the door. Hastily he stepped to his brand-new tele- 
phone, gave every appearance of being deep in a business conversa- 
tion. "Yes, Mr. ," he was saying as the man entered, "I'll attend 

to that corporation matter for you. Mr. Jones had me on the phone 
this morning and wanted me to settle a damage suit, but I had to 
put him off as I'm so rushed with cases just now. But I'll try to 
sandwich in your matter between my other cases somehow. Yes, yes. 
All right. Good-bye." Hanging up the receiver he turned to his vis- 
itor, having, as he thought, duly impressed him. "Excuse me, sir," 
said the man, politely, "but I'm from the telephone company. I've 
come to connect up your instrument." 



THE HOME 

INSWIANCC COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Company In 

America" 

FIRE. AUTOMOBILE. WINDSTORM. 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 24, 1923 




ociat 




BUSY CUPID 

HARRISON-EISNER — One of the prettiest weddings of the sea- 
son took place Sunday evening, February 18, at the Hotel 
Richelieu when Miss Miriam Eisner became the bride of 
Rudolph Edward Harrison. Dr. Herman Lissauer performed 
the ceremony in the presence of thirty-five relatives and 
friends. The bride looked charming in a gown of white 
crepe trimmed in crystal and pearl and wore the conven- 
tional bridal veil, with her mother's wedding wreath. She 
carried a bridal bouquet of cyclamen and lilies of the valley. 
Miss Vera Eisner, the bride's cousin, acted as bridesmaid while 
Mr. Harold Heskins attended the groom. Immediately after 
the ceremony and dinner the young couple left on their 
honeymoon trip to Los Angeles and San Diego. On their 
return they will occupy their new home at 768 Twentieth 
avenue. 

RUGC.LES-WELLINGTON — Miss Annette Ruggles, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. James D. Ruggles, of Berkeley became the bride 
of Mr. Arthur Boole Wellington of San Francisco at an at- 
tractive wedding solemnized last Saturday evening. The cere- 
mony was performed at the family residence in Berkeley, 
the Rev. F. Augustus Martyr officiating, and was witnessed 
by the relatives of both families and a few close friends. Mrs. 
Donald McKee was matron of honor. Mr. Donald McKee was 
his cousin's best man, and the ushers were Mr. Kenneth 
Davis, another cousin: Mr. Beverley Letcher, Mr. Arthur 
Turner and Mr. Edward Sargent. On the conclusion of their 
honeymoon. Mr. and Mrs. Wellington will make their home 
at Crystal Lakes in the High Sierras. The bride is a gradu- 
ate of the University of California, and since finishing her 
college course has been interested in social work carried on 
under the auspices of the University Hospital in San Fran- 
cisco. Her father is associated with the Bank of California. 
Mr. Wellington is the son of Mr. Arthur Wellington of San 
Francisco, and is a nephew of Mrs. John Dempster McKee 
and Mrs. Winfleld Scott Davis of San Francisco. He is a for- 
mer Stanford man. and is now associated in lumber activities. 

HALDEMAN-LEIB — The marriage of Miss Isabel Haldeman. 
daughter of Mrs. John Haldeman and the late John Halde- 
man, of Louisville, Ky.. to George Leib of San Francisco, 
took place on Saturday afternoon in Procathedral. Avenue 
George V. in Paris. Cables included no description of the 
ceremony, except for the fact that among the wedding guests 
were quite a number of California friends of the bridegroom. 
who are in Paris for the season. Mrs. Haldeman, with whom 
Mrs. Leib and a younger sister have been visiting in Paris 
for the past six months, gave her daughter in marriage. Mr. 
and Mrs. Leib sailed Sunday on the Mediterranean cruise to 
pass their honeymoon in Algiers. 

BRAYER-DENT — Announcement is made of the marriage of 
Miss Bertha Brayer. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George H. 
Brayer of this city, to Ulysses Grant Dent, only son of Wren- 
shall S. Dent and the late Mrs. Catherine E. Dent. Mr. Dent 
senior is a nephew of the late Mrs. U. S. Grant, wife of Gen- 
eral Grant, former president of the United States. The Bray- 
er-Dent marriage was so quietly and simply done that news 
of it comes as a surprise to the friends of the two families. 
The ceremony took place at Los Gatos on January 23, and 
only recently was made known. The newlyweds will make 
their home in this city. 

HAYNE-HUNT — Mrs. Jane Selby Hayne and Harry C. Hunt were 
married Wednesday at the former's home in Burlingame. 
It was a small, simple ceremony, with only the relatives of 
the two families present. Mr. Hunt is a son of Mrs. Ella L. 
Hunt. His sisters are Mrs. Edw. N. Short and Mrs. Harry Rice 
Bostwick. and Mrs. Jack Winston and Mrs. Warner Bliss are 
his nieces. Mrs. Hayne is the daughter of Percy W. Selby 
of San Mateo. She is related to the Athertons and the Mac- 
ondrays on her late mother's side. Following the ceremony, 
the guests remained for a wedding supper. The newlyweds 
will make their home in Los Angeles. 

ROBERTS-STAATS — Mrs. Louise Woelz Roberts, daughter of 
Mrs. Harry Philips of San Francisco, and John Stearns Staats 
of San Francisco and Pasadena were married Tuesday even- 
ing in the Red room at the Fairmont Hotel. Rev. Van Nuys 
read the marriage ceremony in the presence of about thirty- 
five relatives and intimate friends. 



LUNCHEONS 

PETERS — In honor of Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Van Wyck Peters 
Mr. and Mrs. Algernon Gibson entertained at a luncheon Sun- 
day at the Burlingame Country Club. Accepting their hos- 
pitality were Mr. and Mrs. Horace Hill, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 
Gibson, Mr. and Mrs. Roger Bocqueraz, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard 
Waterlow Ford, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Poole, Mr. and Mrs. 
Clarke Burgard, Mr. and Mrs. William Duncan and Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard Girvin. 

BAYNE — Mrs. Richard Bayne entertained a small group of 
friends informally at luncheon last Thursday at her home 
in Jordan avenue. The guests were Mrs. Grant Selfridge, 
Mrs. George B. Kelham, Mrs. William B. Tubbs, Mrs. Henry 
J. Crocker, Mrs.' Frank King, Mrs. William Hinckley Taylor 
and Mrs. Ashton Potter. 

EYRE — Mrs. Perry Eyre gave a small luncheon at her home in 
town Monday for Mrs. Roy Durand Herrick of Minneapolis, 
who is at the Cecil for a visit of several months. Mrs. Henry 
J. Crocker gave a small tea for Mrs. Herrick last week. 

POPE — In honor of Mrs. Whitelaw Reid, who had planned leav- 
ing last week for Santa Barbara, but who has delayed her 
departure, Mrs. George A. Pope entertained at a luncheon 
Tuesday at her Burlingame home. 

MOORE — Miss Mary Bernice Moore, the debutante daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Moore, was the guest of honor at 
an informal luncheon given by Miss Alice Hanchett and Miss 
Lucy Hanchett at their home in Washington street. 

HOMBLADT — In honor of Prince Valdemar, an informal lunch- 
eon at the Fairmont Hotel was given by Mr. Leuritz Hom- 
bladt and Countess Hombladt. The hostess was born Count- 
ess von Moltke and comes from the distinguished European 
family of that name. The Dutchess of Cumberland, a sister 
of the prince, is the godmother of the countess, and the fam- 
ilies have been intimate for many generations. 

LOWENBERG — Mrs. Charles Gould Morton was the guest of 
honor at a luncheon given by Mrs. I. Lowenberg in the Rose 
room at the Palace Hotel. The hostess was assisted in re- 
ceiving by Mrs. Charles Gould, Mrs. Ray Lyman Wilbur, 
Mrs. Wilmer Gresham, Mrs. Benjamin Ide Wheeler, Mrs. H. 
M. Teuney, Mrs. Frank K. Mott, Mrs. Abraham Lincoln 
Brown. 

ST. FRANCIS — Innumerable small groups came together for 
luncheon in the Garden and Fable room of the Hotel St. 
Francis Monday. Mrs. Daniel C. Jackling and Mrs. Thomas 
Eastland were together at one of the cozy tables in the Gar- 
den. 

Mrs. Walter Filer, Mrs. Ross Ambler Curran and Mrs. Alex- 
ander Hamilton were another of the attractive groups. 
Others who entertained small groups in the Garden and Fable 
room were Mrs. George Cameron and Mrs. Joseph O. Tobin, 
Mrs. Rennie Pierre Schwerin, Miss Mary Martin and Miss 
Eleanor Spreckels, Mr. and Mrs. Michel Weill, Mrs. Max Wolk 
and Miss Tiny O'Connor. 

TEAS 
COLBURN — Miss Maye Colburn entertained at tea in Laurel 

Court at the Fairmont Monday for a group of the debutantes. 

Miss Elizabeth Huff, daughter of Mrs. Charles Gould Morton, 

and her house guest from the east. Miss Mary Lewis, and 

Miss Roberta Jennings, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Webster 

Wardell Jennings, were the guests of honor. 
DAVIS — Mrs. Duncan Davis entertained at a bridge and tea party 

Wednesday afternoon at the Hotel Fairmont. The affair took 

place in the Florentine room. 




Under the guidance of R. H. Collins and his as- 
sociates, the Peerless was bound to be a better 
and better Peerless. The public response came 
quickly and is indicated by augmented sales in old 
Peerless strongholds and throughout the country 
in general. 

Pioneer Motor Company 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

1900 Van Ness Ave., Corner Washington St. 
Telephone Prospect 8800 



February 24. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 






BRIDGE 

LICHTEXBERG — In honor of Mrs. Ellsworth Harper Van Pat- 
ten, wife of Lieutenant Commander Van Patten, who was 
Miss Evelyn McQaw, Miss Helen Lichtenberg entertained in- 
formally at bridge this Saturday. During the absence of 
her husband, who is en route to Panama with the Pacific 
fleet. Mrs. Van Patten is with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John 
McGaw, in town. 

WARREN— Mrs. Harry Oliver Warren will entertain at bridge 
at her home March I! for Mrs. Howard McCandless, formerly 
Miss Doris Wirtner. Mrs. Donald Bradford will give a tea for 
Mrs. McCandless March 2. 
PFINGST — Mrs. Florence Porter Pfingst has issued invitations 
to a bridge breakfast to be given Wednesday, February 2S, 
at the Fairmont Hotel. Several score of guests will enjoy 
the hostess' hospitality. 

MORBIO — In honor of Miss Maybelle Brawner and Miss Mar- 
jorie Lovegrove, Miss Alberta Morbio entertained at a bridge 
tea on Saturday afternoon at the empire room of the Fair- 
mont Hotel. 

MOORE; — Miss Katherine Bentley, who recently announced her 
engagement to Mr. Raymond Phelps of New York, and Miss 
Margaret Buckhee, who will become the bride of Mr. John 
Boyden on April 2, shared honors at a bridge luncheon given 
by Miss Elizabeth Moore. The attractive affair was held at 
the home of the hostess in Piedmont. 

BRADFORD — Mrs. Donald Bradford will entertain at a bridge 
tea early in March at her home in this city, when the prin- 
cipal guest will be Mrs. Howard McCandless, a recent bride. 
DINNERS 

NORCROSS — Mr. and Mrs. Percy Pettigrew, who are the incen- 
tives for many social functions in the weeks preceding their 
departure for Europe, were the guests of honor Thursday 
at a dinner dance at which Mr. and Mrs. David Copeland 
Norcross entertained. The party was held in the San Fran- 
cisco Golf and Country Club and was enjoyed by a company 
of fifty. 

MARTIN — Among the attractive affairs scheduled for this week 
was the dinner which Mr. and Mrs. Walter Martin gave 
Wednesday evening at their home at Burlingame. 

BULL — In honor of Prince Valdemar of Denmark, Commodore 
and Mrs. James H. Bull entertained at an elaborate dinner 
Monday evening at the St. Francis Hotel. The dinner was 
originally planned for Friday evening, but was postponed 
owing to the fact that the prince's ship was delayed in reach- 
ing port. The affair was held in a suite of rooms in the hotel, 
which were charmingly arranged and decorated for the oc- 
casion. Mrs. Bull and her daughter, Mrs. Cheever Newhall, 
were presented at court to King George, Queen Mary and 
the Dowager Queen Alexandria on May 23, 1911. Queen 
Alexandria is a sister of Prince Valdemar, and it seems espe- 
cially fitting that Mrs. Bull should entertain for the prince 
during his visit in San Francisco. Another interesting co- 
incidence is that Major Henry T. Bull was at one time aide 
to Prince Valdemar's son, Prince Axel. 

CROCKER — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Templeton Crocker gave a 
dinner at their home in San Mateo Saturday night. Their 
guests included Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Rose Vincent, Mr. and 
Mrs. Bernard Ford, Mrs. Fentriss Hill, Mrs. Arthur Cheese- 
brough. Miss Marjory Josselyn, S. F. B. Morse and Douglas 
Alexander. 

SCOTT — Mr. and Mrs. Harry H. Scott gave a pleasant greeting 
to Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Rose Vincent by having a dinner 
party in their honor last Friday evening. 

MOFFITT — Dr. and Mrs. Herbert Moffitt entertained at a din- 
ner on Friday evening at their home in Broadway, later at- 
tending the Alcazar with their guests. Still later in the even- 
ing the hosts and their party repaired to the Hotel St. Francis 
for supper. The affair was a surprise party in celebration 
of the eighteenth birthday of their daughter. Miss Alice Mof- 
fitt. 

IN TOW \ AND OUT 

de LATOl'R — Mrs. Georges de Latour and Miss Helene de La- 
lour look their departure Monday for Santa Barbara to en- 
joy a fortnight's sojourn. 

MARTIN— Mrs. Waller Martin and the Misses Mary and Elea- 
nor Martin left Monday for Santa Barbara for a ten days' 
rest, and Mr-. Robert Hays Smith is likewise in the south- 
ern city on a holiday trip. 

HUTCHINS — Mrs. William Marvin Hutchins and her baby, who 
have been spending the past month in San Francisco as the 
tuests of Mrs. Hutchins' parents. Dr. and Mrs. John Harold 
Philip, in Valle.io street, took their departure on Saturday for 
their l.os Angeles home Mrs. Hutchins will he remembered 
in San Francisco society as Miss Eunice Philip. 



WELCH— Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Welch left last Friday for 
the Grand Canyon of the Colorado to be away for about ten 
days. i , 

BULL, — Major Henry T. Bull, IT. S. A., arrived in San Francisco 
Tuesday for a several days' visit with his parents, Commo- 
dore and Mrs. James H. Bull. Major Bull has been visiting 
his sister, Mrs. Cheever Herbert Newhall, at her home in 
Santa Barbara. Major Bull is stationed in Washington, D. C, 
where he is on General Holbrook's staff. He is on an in- 
spection tour of the state colleges, and after his visit in 
San Francisco will go to Texas and then on to Washington. 

ROTH — Mr. and Mrs. William P. Roth and their family sailed 
on the Matsonia Wednesday for a several weeks' trip to 
Honolulu. On their return the Roths, who have been during 
the winter at their home in Jackson street, will leave for 
their home at Woodside, where they will spend the summer. 
They have recently bought one of the attractive old places 
at Woodside, which is near the Jackling estate. 

PARK — Mrs. Howard Park has gone to Santa Barbara to visit 
relatives. 

CAMERON — Mr. and Mrs. George Cameron, accompanied by their 
house guests, Miss Mary Forbes and Miss Caro Shaw of New 
York, left Wednesday on a motor tour toward Southern Cali- 
fornia, visiting en route at Santa Barbara. The Camerons 
will return this week, while their guests will later on pro- 
ceed to their homes. 

INTIMATIONS 

BRUN — Dr. and Mrs. Harold Brun are now occupying the resi- 
dence they recently purchased in Jackson street, west of Di- 
visadero. 

BEAVER — Mrs. Frederick Hope Beaver and her daughter, Mrs. 
Horace Van Sicklen, are in New York and have taken apart- 
ments at the Waldorf-Astoria for the period of their stay. 

WEILL — Mr. and Mrs. Michel Weill have bought one of the 
community apartments now in process of construction at the 
northwest corner of California and Gough streets and will 
occupy it just as soon as it is completed. 

DEL MONTE — The Dean Bedfords of New York City are en- 
joying to the full the wonderful horseback rides through the 
Del Monte forest trails. They are making an extended stay 
at the Del Monte Lodge at Pebble Beach. 

Colonel and Mrs. J. Hudson Poole are spending a few days 
in their home at Pebble Beach. The Pooles are from Pasa- 
dena, but they summer at Pebble Beach and spend many 
holidays there during the winter. 
Mrs. Thomas Scott Brooke of San Rafael is a guest. 
Mr. and Mrs. John R. Stephens of Los Angeles are spending 
a part of their honeymoon here. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Gordon Moore have taken the Arthur 
Hill Vincent house at Pebble Beach for six weeks. They 
plan to go down in a week or ten days, to remain through 
the polo tournament. Mr. Moore is with the peninsula colony 
at Riverside for the polo matches this week. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 

Van Ness At*., at Geary Street SAN FRANCISCO 

Is the most refined family hotel in the city 

— a home unsurpassed 

KIMF.R M WOODBURY Manager 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sntter 8130 L'nder Management CARL S. STANLEY 



Spectacles and eyeglasses 
for "Mah Jot&gg" 

Many players of that 
ancient fascinating Chinese 
game Mah Jongg" have 
experienced eye strain and 
headaches due to the un- 
usual concentration neces- 
sary while playing — others 
find It difficult to see the 
"tiles' in their hand and 
at the same time see those 
that have been played. We 
have computed special 
lenses to correct this dis- 
advantage which we will 
gladly explain at any of 
our establishments. 



: g^" 1 




San FrancUco - 181 Poit. ZS08 Ml»«lon Sta. 
Berkeley - - - - S10S Sbattark At«ii« 
Oakland lttl Broadway 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 24, 1923 





^FTMANCIAy 

By P. N. BERINGER 




THE near-war conditions in Europe have 
had practically no effect on trade con- 
ditions in this country. It may be entirely 
too soon to write anything about this and 
the effects may be felt later. Probably it 
would be truer now to say that we have 
achieved a state of near-normalcy in this 
country and that the conditions in Europe, 
in their economic effect, are not so very 
different ber.ause of the French occupation 
of German territory. Eventually, the occu- 
pation will have a beneficial effect all around 
as anything bringing back sane routine hab- 
its to Europe must be beneficial to us all 
and we were getting nowhere with Germany 
feigning a bankrupt state. 



Turkey and the World 

There has always been a very close al- 
liance as to Germany and Turkey and the 
actions of the Turks as to the harbors of 
Smyrna and Ismid and other ports is evi- 
dently part of a plan in order to keep Great 
Britain busy and out of Germany while the 
Germans do all they can to bedevil the 
French and the rest of the world. At the 
same time a strained state of affairs is 
brought about as to Great Britain and France. 
From the statement of Bonar Law it may 
be taken for granted the British people do 
not yet sense the situation correctly. Great 
Britain is still at her old tactics of looking 
for trade advantage in every direction and, 
at the same time, is paying most careful 
attention to the demands of the Labor party 
in England. That party wants peace at any 
price. So, Bonar Law finds himself between 
the devil and the deep sea. 



The Effective Method 

It is a very strange thing peace advocates 
all over the world have not yet come to 
know that by following their behests more 
people have been tortured and killed than 
if the war had endured and come to a 
quick and a real conclusion. The only ef- 
fective way to bring the hideous social and 
economic conditions in Europe and Asia to 
a conclusion, bringing happiness and peace 
to the greatest number, is by effective ac- 
tion. Just decisions, enforced by arms, if 
necessary, is the only way to arrive any- 
where. The French have taken the right 
stand and the British are only just begin- 
ning to sense what should be done as to 
the Turk. 



The Crops and Frost 

The farmeT is a prey to so many evils 
that he is in reality the greatest gambler 
in the world. And his work is hard and 



unremitting, too. This year Nature has been 
bountiful in giving us a generous downfall 
of rain and the indications are that, unless 
something happens, the crops will be larger 
than in any previous year in California's 
history. The one big fearsome thing the 
farmer dreads just now is Jack Frost and 
what he will do to the blossoming trees. 
However, there is every indication of a very 
early spring and, in this case, the frosts 
are not so much to be dreaded. The pray- 
ers of those in the cities, whom the farmer 
feeds, should go forth that the farmer may 
be spared the hardships of frosts. 



Money Conditions 

The banks report that money conditions 
as improving all of the time. Money is 
easier and loans are being made where it 
was impossible to get money before. Busi- 
ness men are expanding their ventures, with 
a view to a very large increase in trans- 
actions during 1923. Manufacturing enter- 
prises are multiplying and manufacturers in 
turn are employing more men and women 
than ever before. Retail dealers in all sorts 
of commodities report better business and, 
logically, the wholesaler is making no com- 
plaint. 



Building Conditions 

Building conditions are becoming more 
and more active with every day which 
passes and this is true not only as regards the 
building of business structures in every city 
about the bay but especially so as regards 
San Francisco. In the residence districts 
houses are springing up like mushrooms and 
despite this activity the housing problem, so 
acute last year, is not yet solved. The new- 
comers are increasing so rapidly that all 
available residence buildings, apartments 
and houses, are readily taken up almost as 
soon as they are ready for occupancy. There 
is a large amount of building down the 
peninsula and it is only a question of a com- 
paratively short time when it truly may be 
said that there is a "continuing city" be- 
tween San Francisco and San Jose. 



Usury? 

The fact is that if what a great many 
say is true of the bankers of this city, these 
financiers are guilty of practicing usury in 
making loans to their clients, through agents 
conveniently located near the banking in- 
stitutions. The story is going the rounds 
that banks will give really meritorious prop- 
ositions a very careful going over before 
turning them down and then refer the would- 
be borrower to Mr. So-and-so, who has his 



office over on Pine or Bush street. Mr. So- 
and-so is a very agreeable sort of a man, 
who soon arranges for the borrower to get 
his loan and who charges him a fine broker's 
commission for having arranged the matter 
to his satisfaction. One case is told of 
money having been borrowed to perfect a 
machine and that, when the final arrange- 
ment was made, two of the cashiers of the 
bank to whom the original plea for a loan 
was made were the beneficiaries in large 
blocks of stock in the company borrow- 
ing the money from the complacent broker. 



Overseas Business 

Overseas business is rapidly improving and 
the intercoastal shipping business has never 
in all the history of San Francisco been so 
good. Business with Central and South 
America, both coasts, is improving, too. Ship- 
ping men are once more wearing the smile 
that will not come off and importers and 
exporters have at length come out of the 
long season of gloom so long enshrouding 
them. 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION 8TOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter, Just Out 

370 Hush Street 
Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco, Cal. 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Gouffh 
Telephone Park 271 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUELDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



February 24. 1923 



HOTEL PLA7A 

San francisco 



DINING-ROOM 

Surprisingly good meals 
pleasingly served. Note 
the moderate prices: 

ireakfast 25c to 75c 
Luncheon 6So 
Dinner $1.85 

(A la Carte Service also) 




ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
The Mineral Development Company, lo- 
cation of principal place of business, San 
Francisco, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a regular 
meeting of the directors held on the 13th 
day of February, 1923, an assessment of 
one-half cent per share was levied upon 
the issued capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in legal money of the 
United States, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, Room No. 237 
Monadnock Building, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. 

Any stock on which this assessment 
shall remain unpaid on the 2 0th day of 
March, 1923, will be delinquent and ad- 
vertised for sale at public auction, and 
unless payment is made before will be 
sold on Monday, the 16th day of April, 
1923, to pay the delinquent assessment, 
together with costs of advertising and ex- 
pense of sale. 

M. J. SEELY, Secretary, 
237 Monadnock Building, 
San Francisco, California. 



Teeth 



A minute examination of your teeth 
made Heverul tlmeN a year will enable 
you to arrettt any Incipient dlweaNe of the 
guniN before It has a chance to reach the 
acute stage. Our examinations are free. 
If there It* no immediate need for our 
services there will be no charge. We are 
always pleased to talk It over. Red rum- 
or sore teeth sometimes lead to serious 
disorders. Watch your teeth. You will 
like our nerve blocking system ; It takes 
away all the pain and keeps you happy. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Garfield 8S5 
SPECIALISTS — Extractions; < mm; 
Self Cleansing- Bridges; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

FILM FLICKS 



15 



By AGNES KERR CRAWFORD 

ACTUAL work was begun last Monday 
by the Graf Productions at Pacific Stu- 
dios at San Mateo on their next picture, 
"The Fog." It promises to be the most pre- 
tentious photoplay ever filmed by a San 
Francisco production organization. William 
Dudley Pelley's novel, "The Fog," furnishes 
the vehicle for the production. The work- 
ing continuity is from the pen of Winifred 
Dunn. A cast of unusual merit has been 
secured by Max Graf, supervising director, 
to interpret the story. Mildred Harris, for- 
mer wife of Charlie Chaplin, will return to 
the screen in this production after eight 
months, in the leading feminine role. Cul- 
len Landis will be seen as the boy. Louise 
Fazenda, Peggy Wales, and Anna May will 
have prominent feminine roles in the pro- 
duction. Ralph Lewis, Frank Currier, David 
Butler and Edward Philips, all well known 
to photoplay fans, are the remainder of the 
cast so far selected. Paul Powell will di- 
rect and will be assisted by Leigh R. Smith, 
late of the Griffith forces. Mark Strong, co- 
director of "Kismet," is also a prominent 
member of the production staff, and John 
Arnold will be at the camera. "The Fog," 
when completed, will be distributed through- 
out the world by the Metro Pictures Cor- 
poration. 

When Eric Von Stroheim returned to San 
Francisco this week he brought with him 
fifty members of the cast and staff, for the 
filming of "McTeague." Part of the staff 
including Ben Reynolds, camera man, was 
already here, and four electricians from the 
Goldwyn plant arrived last Sunday, to have 
everything in readiness to begin actual shoot- 
ing of the picture the latter part of this week. 

Once more the headliner at the Orpheum 
is a celebrated star of stage and screen, as 
William Faversham. one of the really dis- 
tinguished actors of the world, opened there 
last Sunday in Alfred Sutro's "A Marriage 
Has Been Arranged." He made the jump 
from the east direct to San Francisco, and 
will be here a week and in Los Angeles a 
week. 

* * * 

Ernest Traxler. production manager for 
Goldwyn, having bought a new blue car 
since he came to (own. drove to Los An- 
geles the first of last week. He returned to 
San Francisco in time to help start the ac- 
tual filming of "McTeague." 

* * * 

The San Francisco Producers Association 
held a well attended meeting at the Press 
Club last Wednesday. They are working for 
the general good of the picture industry here 
and among other things against the too rigid 
censorship of the silver screen. 

Wedding Present**— The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who Is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 




Try It 



Many a heavy load of 
care has been removed 
by a timely gift of 



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So different to those others — 
because so much better 

San Francisco 

33 Powell Street, near Market 
130 Post Street, near Grant Ave. 

Oakland 
so 511 Fourteenth Street 



Mayerle's 




Expert Optical Service and 

Scientific Eye Examinations 

960 Market Street 

29 Years in San Francisco 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Cover* 

"Made » little better than iiectna neceuary" 

The typewriter papers are sold In attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold in similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or, if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1866 
37-45 First Street - - San Francisco 



Quality 1866-66 Years-1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following: Places: 

Rurltntame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodsldo 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Franrlsro Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone Sao Mateo 1480 

Economy Durability 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which Is important 
to people who write. Prank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1 1 74 Phelan Building San Francisco 



16 



I '5 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 24, 1923 




PL/DASUR,E>'S WAND 



"Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




Loew's Warfield 

Marcus Loew, owner of Loew's Warfield 
Theater, a similar theater in Los Angeles, 
and several hundred houses throughout the 
United States, has engaged opera stars, 
dancers and other artists who are among 
the most notable in their professions, to ap- 
pear at his Loew's Warfield theater here in 
rapid succession. 

An elaborate program scheduled for the 
week commencing Saturday, February 24, 
will bring a distinguished group of dancers 
to the stage and one of the season's greatest 
successes to the screen. "The Famous Mrs. 
Fair" has been adapted from the play by 
Fred Niblo, who is himself notable as the 
director of "Blood and Sand," starring Ro- 
dolph Valentino, and Douglas Fairbanks in 
"The Three Musketeers." It will be the chief 
film attraction on this program. 

Monsieur Theodore Odolphus, premier 
dancer of the Opera Comique, Paris, will 
present on the stage a spectacular and elab- 
orately costumed dance revue. An added 
musical treat will be provided by Harold 
Kirby, a distinguished English baritone. A 
high standard of musicianship is maintained 
in the tonal setting of the entire program 
each week by the Warfield music masters, 
George Lipschultz conducting. 

The Sherwoods, Bob and Gale, and their 
band of versatile singers and syncopaters 
supply a lively twenty minutes of diversi- 
fied entertainment. A number of supple- 
mentary films complete a generous program. 



Players 

The Players are playing tricks this win- 
ter, those gay and gifted sons of Thespeus! 
Right well do we remember the fair prom- 
ises they made when the season was young 
and every one was full of high hope; those 
lists of plays and playlets that made the 
mouth to water in delicious anticipation ; 
those playwrights' names they conjured by! 
Imagine now our feelings when we learn that 
the long-waited for play that will be pro- 
duced on the Players' stage the evening of 
March 5 is the work of C. C. Dobie. Good 
night! 

One of the saving qualities of the Players' 
organization and of its director has been 
their unwavering rectitude in the matter of 
avoiding amateurishness, a stern lack of 
kindly compromise with the many eager con- 
tributors of mediocre plays that have be- 
sieged their portals. Thus have the mighty 
fallen! And fallen as far as Dobie! Wurra, 
wurra, woe is ours. 




Anna Nilsson, One of the Stars in Cecil B. De Mille's "Adam's Rib," Which Begins 
An Extended Engagement at The Imperial Commencing Saturday 



portentous, is filling the Imperial in this its 
second week. Hobart Bosworth alone would 
attract the crowds, and with him are Elea- 
nor Boardman, Claude Gillingwater, Nigel 
Barrie, Dagmar Godowsky and half a dozen 
other distinguished players, enough to make 
a picture like this one create a furore of 
success. Lewis has his orchestra well in 
hand and is a valuable acquisition with his 
carefully selected programs. 



ance he endows the doleful Dane with a 
beauty as rare as it is satisfying. This and 
Macbeth are the best performances Mr. Lei- 
ber has given. 



Imperial 

"The Strangers' Banquet" with its strong 
cast and its elaborate settings, its dramatic 
situations, its love scenes intense, its plot 



Columbia 

The Hamlet of Franz Leiber is worthy of 
the high standard maintained by this gifted 
young Shakespearean actor throughout his 
repertoire. His interpretation of the charac- 
ter of the melancholy prince is poetic, 
thoughtful and impressive, while in appear- 



Granada 

We do not look to the versatile Mr. Cecil 
De Mille for absolutely authentic informa- 
tion. And that is as well, for we should 
find ourselves at sea and drifting rapidly 
toward the horizon of hazy hyperbole. 
Whatever may be the shortcomings of Mr. 
DeMille as a historian, his reputation as a 
repertoire. His interpretation of the charac- 
is maintained in the current piece at the 
Granada. "Adam's Rib" is its intriguing 
title. There are ten reels of it, and not for 
an instant is any undue strain put upon the 



February 24. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



brain of the spectator. Ail is easy-going men- 
tally. Open your eyes and shut your mind 
and you will thoroughly enjoy this photo- 
drama, in which are seen such notable peo- 
ple as Milton Sills, Elliott Dexter, Anna 
Nilsson, Theodore Kosloff and a strong sup- 
porting company. Paul Ash provides an en- 
tertainment that apparently delights the per- 
formers and a large portion of the audience. 
The short films are, for the most part, of 
considerable interest. 



equal to the music provided. The art-pos- 
ing number by Lucas and Inez is a produc- 
tion of high merit. 



Strand 

Anything with as wicked a reputation as 
New York's has a charm all its own, and it 
was probably easy enough to make this big 
picture, "Lights of New York". — given the 
place, the plot, the camera. The big town, 
so narrow geographically and so broad in 
other ways, lends itself to such sensational 
photography as this. The glimpses of Broad- 
way, of Fifth avenue, of Greenwich Village, 
are rather enticing, and a funny little craw- 
ly, scratchy feeling comes into the remote 
recesses of the heart of a former New 
Yorker who once on a time lived and loved 
and laughed and sighed there, and since has 
acquired a superior attitude of sneer toward 
it; you know the contemptuous eyebrow 
that we lift when we consider a thing we 
have loved — and lost. Coney Island, too, 
is shown in this film. Coney Island! Oh, 
those hot New York August days that ended 
on Coney's crowded beach where the tide 
flowed out and the beer flowed in. A thou- 
sand apologies for this vulgar digression. 
What I started to say was that the produc- 
tion of "Lights of New York" is a worthy 
one, and well presented by some good ac- 
tors headed by Marc MacDermott, also 
greatly enhanced by the interpretive music 
that is noticeably appropriate. 



Orpheum 

The appearance of William Faversham at 
the Orpheum is bringing large numbers of 
the popular English actor's admirers to 
O'Farrell street, and the playlet, "A Mar- 
riage Has Been Arranged," is well chosen 
for the expression of his many delightful 
personal characteristics. It is considerably 
above the level of such productions, and 
Mr. Faversham's work is quite out of the 
common, affording keen enjoyment to the 
lovers of clever acting. 

Music and fun are supplied by Frank 
Davis and Adele Darnell in their comedy 
bit called "Birdseed." Miss Williams and 
Miss Nannessi, both San Francisco girls, have 
a good dancing act. For a monologist we 
have Jack Osterman, whose style is breezy 
and line of chatter immensely amusing. He 
has considerable originality and an endless 
supply of humor. A fantastic affair made 
up of pretty scenes and farcical antics is 
carried off with a whirl by Olive Frances, 
James Carle and Ronald Claire; they call 
their act "Thanksgiving," and it is certain- 
ly a good, big feed of fun. 

The Two Little Singing Love Birds have 
an excellent act, but their voices are hardly 



Wild Flower Show at the Palace 

With the entry of the California Club and 
California State Floral Society the Califor- 
nia Spring Blossom and Wild Flower Asso- 
ciation will give one of the finest exhibits 
and pageants ever held in the Palace hotel 
ballroom and rose bowl April 20-21, 1923. 

Mrs. Elmer M. Woodbury, founder and 
starter of the movement for an annual spring 
blossom and wild flower show to eventually 
be as famous as the Tournament of Roses at 
Pasadena, the Portland Rose Carnival and 
the Saratoga Blossom Fete, was elected pres- 
ident. Other officials of the association are: 
Miss Alice Eastwood, head of the botanical 
section of the Academy of sciences at Golden 
Gate Park; Miss Katherine Chandler, author 
of various wild flower books; Mrs. W. A. 
D'Egilbert, president Children's Society 
American Revolution; Mrs. E. C. Sutliffe, 
Mrs. S. E. Hirstel and Mrs. Joseph Mells. 



California 

The atmosphere and picturesque surrsund- 
ings of the Latin countries are especially 
adaptable to motion picture purposes and 
Gloria Swanson's beautiful new play, "My 
American Wife," owes much of its artistic 
success to the fact that it is laid in the 
Argentine country where the sunshine smiles 
upon lovely old dwellings and exquisite gar- 
dens and splendid mansions full of historical 
interest. But to the star herself is due the 
greatest measure of praise, for her intelli- 
gent acting, her frankly alluring personality 
and her expressive grey eyes are what make 
this one of the very best screen plays of the 
year. The story moves swiftly and smooth- 
ly, without a flaw in construction and well- 
sustained interest until the moment of Gloria's 
denouncement of the handsome Spanish vil- 
lain. Comes then a clumsy, almost crude 
cessation of continuity, and all of the hero- 
ine's fine acting cannot redeem it. Antonio 
Moreno has the agreeable task of playing 
opposite this splendid creature, so well named 
Gloria. He is a good-looking, pleasant man- 
nered young man, but not much of an actor. 
The part of his mother (in the picture) is 
excellently portrayed by Edythe Chapman. 
Too much praise can never be given to an 
actress clever enough to distinguish a com- 
monplace role by her rendition of it. Geno 
Corroda is a nice, neat little gentlemanly 
villain and Walter Long is a magnificent big 
burly one. I don't know when I've enjoyed 
a motion picture so much — if that is of in- 
terest to any one but myself. 



Wild Flower Show at Auditorium 

The ninth annual state exhibit of Cali- 
fornia wild flowers will be held at the Ex- 
position auditorium in San Francisco in 
April, and as announced last spring, will be 
open to the general public. These marvelous 
displays of native flora have been held an- 
nually ever since the year of the exposition 



and are Rotable events. The display this 
year will be on a magnificent scale and of 
great educational value to the general pub- 
lic. Its object is to stimulate interest in the 
movement for protecting the wild flowers and 
native plants and the plan has received the 
hearty endorsement of the San Francisco 
board of education. The work is under the 
direction of Mrs. Bertha Rice of Saratoga, 
and Mrs. Roxana Ferris of Stanford Uni- 
versity, assisted by many leading scientists 
and naturalists of the Pacific Coast. Luther 
Burbank and David Starr Jordan are hon- 
orary presidents of the organization, which 
has achieved excellent results in its efforts 
to awaken interest in the wild flowers. 



The Last Symphony 

The last popular municipal concert of 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra will, 
take place at the Exposition auditorium on 
Saturday evening, March 3. When the series 
was originally planned the date for the final 
concert was set for March 1 , but as it was 
found impossible to clear the auditorium of 
the automobile show by then, the later time 
was fixed. The original season tickets, dated 
March 1 , will of course be honored. 

Efrem Zimbalist, the eminent young Rus- 
sian violinist, will be the guest artist on this 
occasion and with the orchestra he will play 
Mendelssohn's Concerto in E Minor. He will 
also play Saint-Saens' Havanaise and the 
Ysaye arrangement of Saint Saens' Valse 
Caprice. Warren D. Allen, the distinguished 
organist of Stanford University, will preside 
at the console of the great municipal organ 
in Boellmann's Fantasie Dialoguee for or- 
chestra and organ. 



SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 

<>r.< HKSTRA 

ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 

LAST POPULAB MUNICIPAL I'OMKKT 

Exposition Aiiflllnrium 

Sntiirdiiv Kw.. Mitrrlt :4. rtt Bltl 



ZIMBALIST 



Km-- inn \ lollnUt, 

« AKKKN I» 

Stanford OrjcunUt 



GUM. Artist 
M.I.KN 
Hi rin- Oi-kai. 
><■. .".Or, (.nil IB« 



. No war Taj i 

N'nw .hi sale at Sherman, ' !la 

t ilrectton Auditorium Committee, 
■ i of Supen I 




M ™ s 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted in Dross Circle 
and Logos 



18 



Fred Kahn 

Automotive Engineering in Its 
Entirety 

UNDER ONE ROOF 



General Repairing and Overhauling 

Fender and Ignition 

Radiator Work Welding 

Body Building Brazing 

Woodwork Blacksmithing 

Machine Work »-'loetrical 

fiirbiiretion 



Experts in Every Branch 
1507 SCTTER Telephone West 8206 

Authorized Elgin Parts and Service 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Shnonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 34 18 -Phones- Prospect 8410 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

EYE. EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Honn : £ till 4, and hy Appointment 

Phone Softer 1718 

REMOVED TO 

Howard Building, 209 Post Street 

Corner Grant Arenne, San Franclaeo 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

jHj 

Second Speeds 

aMaisstgireiKiRiiaigiSiJgiRimgl 

Barney Oldfield's First Auto Race 

In these days of elegance and luxury and 
the tendency in auto construction towards 
endurance coupled with simplicity of lines 
as the main features of a car, it is inter- 
esting to hark back to the early nineties, 
when motor manufacturers built their prod- 
ucts with the idea that a first class car 
must be a racer, and the test of a car, speed. 
Henry Ford (the man, as some wit has 
said, who made walking a pleasure), al- 
though he did not agree with this idea, felt 
that he must build a speed car. 

He put in his model four great cylinders 
giving it 80 horse power — which up to that 
time had been unheard of — and named it 
the "999." The roar of those cylinders alone 
was enough to half kill a man. "Going over 
Niagara Falls would have been a pastime 
after riding in it," says Ford. 

He did not wish to take the responsibility 
of racing it himself so he wired to Salt 
Lake City for Barney Oldfield, a professional 
bicycle rider, who was absolutely fearless 
and lived on speed. 

"Controlling the fastest car of today was 
nothing as compared to controlling that car," 
he says. "The steering wheel had not yet 
been thought of. All of the previous 
cars that I had built simply had tillers. On 
this one I put a two-handled tiller, for hold- 
ing the car in line required all the strength 
of a strong man. The race for which we 
were working was at three miles on the 
Goose Point track. We kept our car as a 
dark horse. We left the predictions to the 
others. The tracks then were not scienti- 
fically banked. It was not known how much 
speed a motor car could develop. 

"No one knew better than Oldfield what 
the turns meant, and as he took his seat, 
while I was cranking the car for the start, 
he remarked cheerily: 'Well, this chariot 
may kill me, but they will say afterward 
that I was going like hell when she took 
me over the bank.' 

"And he did go. . . . He never dared 
to look around. He did not shut off on the 
curves. He simply let that car go — and go 
it did. He was about half a mile ahead 
of the next man at the end of the race!" 



February 24, 1923 



Peroxide Treatment for Carbon 

It is claimed that if a little peroxide of 
hydrogen is introduced into the combustion 
chamber, either through the auxiliary air in- 
take on the carburetor, or through some such 
device as a petcock arranged in the inlet 
manifold, it will tend to reduce the amount of 
carbon formed. 

Of course it is not necessary to supply a 
continuous stream. Perhaps once a week, 
when shutting down, introduce half an ounce 
or so into the manifold with the engine still 
running. The theory is that on heating, the 
peroxide gives off oxygen which readily 
burns off the carbon accumulation. 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 




MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEXEON - 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



1140 Geary Street 



Tel. Franklin 86HS 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining to Aut»moiille» 

Oxy-Acetylene Welding — Blaeksmilhiiijr 

H. W. Culver M. Daberer I.. Johnson 



LEE S. DOLSON CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, ».■»«■ per tlaj'i $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

I'll. .in- Kearny 4f>36 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 

$1.25 

MeaU Served a la Curte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinner** 

EiSH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Suits Pressed by II mid. Only — 
sniis Called for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 
433 Mason St. Phone Franklin 2510 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



I Compensation 

General 
Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 



WALTER W. DERR 

105 MONTGOMERY STREET 



Manager 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 30th, 1922 

Assets $80,671,392.53 

Deposits 76,921,392.53 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,750,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 400,613.61 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haipht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter 

(4M) per cent per annum was declared for the six 

months ending December 31st, 1922. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 
Anglo-London-Paris Company 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 5 600 
San Francisco. Calif. 



RECOMMENDS 



Irrigation District Bonds 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 

first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6 3/4% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION- DISTRICT BOND 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 S15.000.000 Reserve Fond 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG.: NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 



San Francisco Office: 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager 



450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

W. J. COUI/THARD. Assistant Manager 



S>an iPranrtHrn (jUjrnntrl? 

Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 

A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Dally and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for $1.15 a month- 
including Sunday editions 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster 




N. W. CORNER 

POtK and POST STS. 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to II p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 116 San Bruno, Cal. 



TYPEWRITERS 

(. n si t-ii in (■<■<) Fnrtory Kf built 

All Makes jggijg^, 

See the New Remington Portable 
The Standard Keyboard Portable 

Paper — Ribbons — Carbon — Supplies 
AMERICAN WRITING MACHINE CO. 

500 Market St.* San Pran. Phone Dong 1 . 649 

808 1 2th St.. Oakland I'lione Ob kin ml -i7fi4 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.).._ 75c 

Pinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner. Sundays and Holidays.. 91.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 







Mechanically the Larkins Top is guaranteed 

for the life of your car. It combines beauty 

of line with mechanical perfection 

Notice the distinctive features of our tops 
displayed at the Auto Show 

Visit our exhibit downstairs and see the cars 
finished in 

LARKINS RYNAMEL 



I 




3700 Geary Str. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Y 

2 



Tak kins Auto mobile Poi nting Iast s Tqng er 



•E5g« 



5S 




$5.00 PER YEAR 



SAN FRANCISCO 



California Advertiser 

SATURDAY, MARCH 3, 1923 | « >s ANGEL E S 




"The dnj is opening like n fom, 
ivttti on iM-ttti backward carted 



Till nil it* lifHiiIv luirn- it ml glow* 
X ml all il- friisrunrr In tinf urlril.' 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR . . Manager 

105 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAX FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings 

Banks ot San Francisco 




BOND DEPARTMENT 
Anglo-London-Paris Company 




526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 30th, 1922 

Assets $80,671,392.53 

Deposits 76,921,392.53 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,750,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 400,613.61 



MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7lh Ave. 

HAICHT STREET BRANCH Haiitlit and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 



A Dividend to Depositors cf Four and One-quarter 

(4M) P er cen t P er annum was declared for the six 

months ending December 31st, 1922. 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 5 6 00 
San Francisco, Calif. 



RECOMMENDS 



Irrigation District Bonds 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 

first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6 3/4% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOND 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 



Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal 



San Francisco Office: 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager 



450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



g>an iFranriBrn QUfrmttrb 

Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 

A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for $1.15 a month- 
including Sunday editions 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster 



TYPEWRITERS 

Guaranteed Factory Kebuilt 

All Makes S™ D 

See the New Remington Portable 
The Standard Keyboard Portable 

Paper — Ribbons — Carbon — Supplies 
AMERICAN WRITING MACHINE CO. 

506 Market St., San Fran, 1'hone Dour. C4i> 
308 I2tli St., Oitklanil Phone Oak hind 3764 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11 :30 to 2 p. m.) .... 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and HoIidays..$1.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1866 




TER 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 





VOL. CII 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, MARCH 3, 1923 



No. 9 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building. Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif.. Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill. E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year. $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

— After all this publicity, Tutankhamen will not make his formal 
debut until next autumn. 

* * * 

— Have the liquor raids which C. H. Wheeler officiated in while 
in Los Angeles anything to do, we wonder, with his present indis- 
position? 

— We have discovered that the fog siren which we have been 
complaining of, is situated on the end of the Golden Gate ferry 
wharf and not on Alcatraz. Why wouldn't an ordinary fog horn 
satisfy the ferry company? 

— The House immigration committee has shown its wisdom in 
reporting favorably a resolution providing temporary admission of 
Chinese labor to the Hawaiian Islands. Where the mistake is made, 
though, is in allowing "other alien labor" to enter, in addition to 
the Chinese. 

— A Britisher told us the other day, when we were speaking of 
the sum it costs yearly to support the royal family of England, that 
"if everyone in Great Britain, on the King's birthday, drank his 
health in a glass of ale, the sum procured would keep the royal 
family for a year." Which only shows, we think, what a high 
tax is placed on the British merchants. In fact, anyone "in trade" 
in Great Britain, parts with 30 per cent of his income for the up- 
keep of the government. 

* * * 

— Perhaps in no other part of the world, can the passenger on 
an interurban line travel for so many miles through blossoming 
orchards, as can the passenger on the Peninsula Railway, through 
the beautiful Santa Clara valley. From all sides one can view ex- 
quisite fruit blossoms; almonds, cherry, peach, prune and apricot. 
In only a week or so the first trees will be in bloom, and this is a 
scene unsurpassed, we are inclined to believe, anywhere else in the 

country. 

* * * 

— In the controversy which Gavin McNab's statement regarding 
San Francisco's "smugness" and "self-satisfaction" has aroused, 
we might draw attention to the immense increase in building which 
is now going on in all sections of the city. Since the American 
plan has gone into effect the building trades have been having a 
boom, and in this respect, at least, we are not behind the times. 
As regards our street car transportation, we are in a rut. which only 
municipal ownership of all car lines can remedy. 



— The other day we noticed an old, old Chinaman, with a wrink- 
led parchment face, like an ancient ivory statue, gazing with deep 
interest at a flag draped picture of "The Father of Our Country," 
in a Stockton street show window. It made us wonder just what 
George Washington would have thought, if he could have known 
that in just this one city of the broad United States he would today 
be the adopted father to some 14,000 yellow men, women and lit- 
tle slant-eyed babies of an alien race? 

— Apropos of the "storm that is gathering in Europe," the Brit- 
ish "Nation" says: "If the French government, in a blind infatua- 
tion for some obscure schemes of its own, goes so far as to wreck 
the hope of peace in the Near East that was encouraged by the 
labors of the Lausanne conference, then the people of this country 
will begin to feel that for all practical purposes, the Entente is at 
an end." 

— And now here are a bunch of women, led by Mrs. Elizabeth 
Gerberding, planning to form a non-partisan movement to hasten 
the entrance of the United States into the League of Nations. And 
there is a goodly list of names of prominent people, male and female, 
back of this movement. We fail to see what good the League of 
Nations has accomplished in the present mixup in Europe, for all 
the nations which belong, are surely working themselves into trou- 
ble. Adding another nation (our own United States) would only 
seem, if we can learn anything at all from present conditions in 
Europe, to complicate matters, and bring us into troubles that are 

not our own. 

* * * 

— Mayor James Rolph Jr. has been asked by a delegation of 
San Francisco hotel men to become a candidate for re-election at 
the next municipal election. We think it is about time to give some 
other able man a show at the mayorality. Hasn't James had it 
long enough? Harvey Toy has refused the nomination, but that 
doesn't always mean that a man won't think it over. In these cases it 
is a good deal like a woman's "No." Mr. Toy is admirably suited 
for such a position, having independent means, and being public- 
spirited to the nth degree. He has shown that money means noth- 
ing to him, when it comes to furthering some movement which will 
work out for the betterment of his native state or city. 

* * * 

— There is a constant complaint about the condition of the streets 
and the blockade and danger which are everywhere apparent. The 
condition of our thoroughfares is a menace and an affront upon 
the organizing ability of our municipality. So far the remedies pro- 
posed are inadequate. Traffic police cannot handle it; and yet the 
solution of the problem is not impossible. Why should we not try 
the plan of one-way streets? If the mass of automobile traffic is 
kept moving in one direction only, it is obviously more easy to 
handle. At any rate, here is the idea, which has been tried and 
found to answer in other cities. We are for one-way streets and 
safety. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 3, 1923 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




Among all the excitement that has been 
Fashion and the Grave raised by the excavations succeeding the dis- 
covery of the grave of Tutenkhamun, al- 
ways supposing that it is the grave of Tutenkhamun, concerning 
which there is some doubt expressed, who would have thought that 
the modistes would have tried to turn an honest penny? Yet, there 
they are examining the left raiment and trying to make a market. 
Rider Haggard, with a sensitiveness which is foreign to our times, 
can even find energy, at his time of life too, to express indignation 
at the violation of the tomb. What will he say of this new daring, 
which sei: es the very grave clothes and turns them to practical ac- 
count for our fashionable ladies? 1 he old latin poet who wrote of 
the "cursed hunger of money" would not find much change if he 
came to life again. But transcending all mere lust for money is 
the lust of the women of fashion for a sensation which will add 
another thrill to the jaded functions of which they have grown 
weary. 

It is this desire which has led to the decimation of the fur-bear- 
ing animals to such an extent that those who know say that they 
will perish utterly unless some means of raising them on special 
farms is devised. Nothing is too high, nothing too low to furnish 
material for the clothes of our fellow citizens and voters of the 
dominant sex. We have yet to hear of a society up to the present 
in which women have sought styles 3000 years old. We, who have 
invented so many things in the last hundred years, are powerless to 
keep up with the never-ceasing yearnings of our women. And it 
has its good side, too. For hundreds of designers and thousands 
of dressmakers will find the means of living during the fall months 
turning out those dresses on the more than ancient models. And 
we, as we pass along Grant avenue, will be dizzied and perplexed 
by the new colors and hieroglyphic decorations for which our wives 
and daughters will clamor in a few months. For the majority of 
the people the name of the great Pharoah will in all probability 
be associated only with the name of a skirt. 



Ihe Rev. Dennis J. Kavanaugh, S. J., put the matter of 
Bigotry bigotry more plainly at the Church of St. Ignatius in a 
sermon the other day than we ever remember to have 
heard before. He said that there have been more arrests in the 
last year in this country for violation of the Volstead act that there 
were in twenty years of the Spanish Inquisition for heresy. Now, 
we have always heard the Inquisition spoken of as the very limit 
of intransigent bigotry. If any public speaker chose to deliver him- 
self upon the theme of bigotry and intolerance the name of Tor- 
quemada would leap to his lips spontaneously and every member 
of his audience would see the picture in his mind of the thin-lipped 
inquisitor who has become the very symbol of vehement intolerance. 
And in one year, as the learned priest points out, we have im- 
prisoned in the name of the law, which violates every fundamental 
of law as we have known it till now, as many as Torquemada did 
in fourteen years. 

Now, if there is one thing that we fancied we were rid of in this, 
our time, it is bigotry. We have always said that in a democracy 
bigotry could not exist, as the free intercourse of citizens and their 
equality before the law would effectually dispose of that. But there 
is a bigotry of fanatics even in a democracy and such fanatics, by 
adopting a superior air, can impose on vast numbers of people a 
regime of intolerance and bigotry which pursues their fellows even 
to the extent of interfering with their legitimate ways of living. 



As the clergyman whom we have already quoted says with elo- 
quent wisdom: "Ihe multiplication of laws in this country, espe- 
cially of the 'blue' variety, is an instance of the aggressive intol- 
erance of an organized minority of fanatics." It could not be better 
put. No wonder there was a congregation of 4000 to listen to such 
sensible and necessary words. Father Kavanaugh has done this 
community a great favor by his brave statement. 



In a motion picture house the other day, the 
France and writer saw pictures of the French cavalry mov- 

American Opinion ing through the streets of Essen with tanks. All 

round the exclamations and comments of the peo- 
ple at the show proved that the audience, as a whole, welcomed 
the sight as sort of poetic justice. It seemed to be the general im- 
pression that the Germans were only getting what was coming to 
them and that it was in the nature of a rough sort of natural jus- 
tice that they should see with their own eyes a little of the indig- 
nity which they had so brutally inflicted upon others in the day of 
their power. No doubt that is about as we all feel, particularly 
those of us who have really appreciated the magnitude of the suf- 
fering so wantonly laid upon the people of France. 

But in the same show there also appeared the German reaction 
to this invasion. Ihose great masses of people, so quietly gathered 
in their enormous meetings had in themselves a sort of menacing 
strength which offset the strength of the armed hosts now dominat- 
ing them. One could not help feeling that out of the masses of 
those hosts of strong-looking men would arise something some day 
which would again renew the conflict, lhere is the crux of the mat- 
ter, lhat is the question which Britain ponders and decides that 
France has made a mistake and that in the long run the invasion 
will not pay, however well it may promise in the immediate present. 
And any one who would have the temerity to declare that it is pros- 
pering in the present, would have the courage of his convictions 
to such an extent as to ignore the facts. Will it pay, either in a 
narrow or a broad sense? Great Britain says that it will not and 
her statesmen are fair experts in what pays nationally. The ten- 
dency at Washington is to support the opinion of Great Britain. A 
policy which does not pay these days is a losing policy and France 
cannot risk loss without hazarding perdition. 



Do you think a few words about flowers are beneath 
Daffodils the dignity of an editorial column? So do not we. In the 

spring of 191b, that terrible spring, when it seemed as 
if all that had been fought for was going by the board and that 
wrong might win, a letter came to the writer from a soldier at the 
front. It said, "1 am writing this on Washington's birthday and I 
can see the daffodils on the street corners, and men, in the morn- 
ing, with great branches of acacias in the streets." And we venture to 
say that those of us a long way from home often in our imagina- 
tion when February comes see just that. We do not estimate the 
effect upon our inner selves of those heaps of flowering beauty 
•which make our city for a few weeks one of the gayest and most 
stimulating places in the world. But the effect is there and every 
child who walks our streets and comes in contact with the wonder 
of the spring flowers is laying up a store of happiness and sweetness 
which may enable him to meet some great crisis in the after years 
with fortitude and sweetness. 

Have you ever noticed that when sorrow comes and anxiety 
pursues you and you sit steeped in your own misery that the mem- 



March i. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



5 



orj will in i nil ol curative fashion travel back to some well 
known and deeply loved spot? Almost always il is some place con- 
nected with your childhood, a river or a lane or a pool or a tree, 
and the thought of it even in the midst of your anguish has at 
least a momentary relieving influence. None but the Omniscient 
can e\er know what soothing and healing influence the sight of the 
daffodils and acacias in our streets has upon numbers of harried and 
worried men and women who pass them. But stand a little and 
watch those who buy them and those who smile as they pass the 
stalls. You will be convinced that more than sermons, the humble 
common flowers are influencing the hearts and consciences of those 
who here are struggling with a hard civilization. Let no one ever 
take away ihe daffodils from the streets of San Francisco. Still 
they give such cheap happiness that many who hate happiness will 
wish to take them away. In fact, it was once tried. 



An age produces the statesmen, writers, inventors which 
Manners? it most needs, the propaganda which, in the nature of 
things, should be disseminated throughout the world. A 
few earnest thinkers supply the most necessary spiritual or mental 
fodder to the many. Perhaps this truism accounts for the numerous 
pamphlets, books and magazine articles on such subjects as, "Who 
Are the Cultured?" "Lssays on Etiquette," "Correct Manners," etc., 
that are Hooding the country at present. This, being an age of 
transition, the outcome of which, those of us who are now living 
will not benefit at all thereby, is naturally, an age wherein things 
that are seemingly superfluous, are lost in the maelstrom of slowly 
and painfully emerging fundamentals. 

Countries are in upheavals physically and nationally; racial and 
religious questions are drawing blood; women are on the rampage 
after centuries of oppression, inclined to go from the one extreme 
to the other; human beings have taken unto themselves wings; 
voices from across the globe are snatched from the very air, im- 
prisoned in small insignificant wooden boxes, to be heard, in turn, 
by thousands; the prophecies of Jules Verne, who, in our child- 
hood days was considered quite mad, are everyday occurences now. 
It is indeed a most alarming and interesting age, a portentous age, 
and in this evolving of Something which we feel is going to solve 
many present problems, the small and apparently unimportant 
amenities of life are being lost in the shuffle. 

Manners are — well, it would be more to the point to say that 
manners aren't any more! One feels their lack in streets, cars, 
hotels, business offices, social functions. The gentle person (and 
there are a few of these rare creatures still extant) is elbowed to 
the wall. It is a question of "push" or be "pushed." 1 he man or 
woman who at times (absent-mindedly perhaps) assumes a cour- 
teous manner, is actually looked upon as eccentric. Ihe young 
person of today who shows the respect due to age, is indeed a ran 
avis. 

Men keep their seats stolidly in street cars, allowing women 
to hang onto straps; they fail to remove their hats when leaving 
women companions on the street; il is an exception when a nun 
now-a-days opens a door for a woman to pass through. I he age 
of chivalry, alas, is past and gone. And this, mind you, is the ar- 
gument given in excuse for their negligence: "Well, what do you 
expect? You consider yourselves our equals now, so we treat you 
just as we would treat each other!" 

In other words, since women have proven themselves to be of 
the same mental caliber as men, they have fallen in men's opinion, 
and are not worthy of their respect! Whatever women have proved 
themselves to be, mentally, does not change this unchangeable fact 
— thai physically they are, and always will be, inferior to men, and 
on that account should be gently dealt with. 

Manners with people in general are conspicuous by their ab- 



sence. I .von in regards to walking on the right side "I the side 
walk. Pedestrians arc becoming indifferent, and bump and plow 
theii way along; no matter how you get there — so long as you 
reach your destination! Passengers stand on platforms of street 
cars, and do not budge out of the way of the person who is striv- 
ing to obtain a foot-hold. Conductors command people to move 
to the front, when there is no possible way of moving further. Much 
travel in the rush hours on street cars, ultimately transforms the 
gentlest dove into a "fretful porcupine." 

Even lerpsichore has suffered from this tendency of the age to- 
wards the ruthless and bizarre. Etiquette used to be an important 
part of the curriculum of dancing academies; now the girl who can 
kick the highest is the most admired. Manners appear to be going 
fast to the demnition bowwows; hence as a natural sequence, this 
Hood of much-needed books on etiquette; some of them misnamed, 
to be sure, as for instance: "Who Are the Cultured?" which should 
be: "Where Are the Cultured?" 



In eastern cities we have watched the erection 
Wild Cat Schemes of large buildings supposedly to be used for the 
manufacturing of automobiles, let us say, where 
in when finished, have been installed the necessary tools, machin- 
ery, etc., for the manufacture of the different parts, where event- 
ually a sample automobile actually costing $1000 to build, will be 
exhibited, at the price of $500! 

Ihe publicity agent then scatters broadcast throughout the coun- 
try laudatory articles which appear in dailies and weeklies, describ- 
ing the wonderful new machine which is soon to be put on the 
market, to sell in competition with the Ford — for instance. Thou- 
sands of orders are taken for this machine and numerous deposits 
accepted, but very few deliveries are made. When the prospective 
buyers expostulate in regard to this slowness, they are told that 
deliveries are being made as fast as possible; that they must wait 
their turn, etc.; that if they are not satisfied, their deposit will be 
returned. 

In the meantime, stock selling in the corporation progresses; 
shares are sold at $100 per share, and 15 per cent of this is paid 
the agent selling the stock. Ihe law requires that the money re- 
ceived shall be used in manufacturing automobiles, and to comply 
with the letter of this law a few machines are made at a loss of 
$500 on each machine. But this loss does not amount to much as 
compared with the hundreds of thousands of dollars that have been 
filched from hundreds of hard working and credulous men and 
women. 

In time the company goes into the hands of a receiver; the 
wouldbe purchaser loses his deposit (if he has not demanded its 
return), the stockholder never realizes on his stock, and the get- 
rich-quick Wallingfords, masquerading as automobile manufactur- 
ers, get off scot-free, with their pockets full of money induced from 
the incredulous, who are, as a rule Lord help them! — almost al- 
ways honest. I his deleterious game has been played to advantage 
in the east; are we ol the wesl foolish and trusting enough to be 
taken in by it also? 

Wake up, prospective purchaser of a $1000 automobile for $500! 
Has not bitter experience taught you by this time that in all such 
propositions there is "a nigger in the wood pile?" Or as we might 
say in this instance, "a leak in the gas tank?" Don't you know 
thai when you are only paying half what a thing is worth, that the 
other half is going to be taken out of your skin in some dark and 
nefarious manner? Don't you know that the most expensive article 
you can buy is "something for nothing"? 



— The United States postoffice issues 800,000 miles of twine every 
year, enough to girdle the earth 30 times. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 3, 1923 



The Ranch of the Witch's Head 




By ELEANORE F. ROSS 

: gggSHSSSSSSgaSSaHlMMa^SHI^^ 

I suppose we would have wandered until we dropped, had we 
not realized presently that it was growing dark, that we were hun- 
gry, that to tell the truth we had no idea of the direction in which 
the ranch lay. 

We sat down under a budding buck-eye, amidst wild flowers and 
blue eyed grass, and anxiously held council. Could we remember 
how many fences we had climbed in our mad chase? We could 
not. Was the ranch east or west, or north or south? "North," I 
said stoutly. "East," maintained Virgie. Was it up hill or down? 
A great deal of both, it seemed to me, while Virgie thought it was 
mostly down hill. 

"It stands to reason," she said wisely, "that water runs down 
hill, and you know we have been going against the stream all this 
time; so of course, we have been going up hill. Therefore, the 
ranch is down hill from here." 

"Stop mixing me up with your ups and downs!" I cried, "Let 
me think! What do men do when they're lost in Captain Mayne 
Reid's books?" 1 frowned fiercely, with at the same time a great 
feeling of superiority. Virgie had never read Reid's books, and I 
had! 

"We can't shoot off a gun because we have none," I went on, 
"but 1 CAN climb a tree." This I did in very quick time, but I 
only found myself staring into the dense, gloomy foliage of the 
forest. 

"Ihere is no use just now in doing anything," Virgie announced 
mysteriously, when I threw myself down beside her again. "We 
are under a spell! " 

Virgie, as far back as I could remember, had always filled our 
heads with fairy lore of all sorts. I suppose it was our Welch blood, 
combined with the fanciful teachings of Maggie, which made fairies, 
to us, just as real as people and, sitting huddled there, in the dark- 
ening forest, listening to the strange sounds and eerie silences, I 
felt very young, and rather frightened, and repressed a yelp with 
difficulty, when, pointing to a hollow oak near by, my sister said in 
a hushed voice, — "Do you see those eyes? There are two white owls 
in that oak, and until they come out, of their own free will, we 
can never find the way home!" 



asSE 

The White Owls 

CHARIER VI. 

THE house was completely settled, even to the laying of the 
parlor carpet. 1 his carpet, being too large for the floor, and 
Mama refusing to have it cut, was spread in slight undulations 
or waves, which 1 maintained was most appropriate, since the pat- 
tern consisted of cream-colored water lilies on an olive green watery 
background. Our furniture was considered in very good taste, quite 
"artistic," but in looking back to those far away days, I realize 
that it was enough to make William Morris turn in his grave, could 
the poor man have beheld it. 

Our very costly lace curtains looked strangely against the "sealed" 
redwood walls, and our highly polished tables and chairs seemed 
to be holding themselves scornfully aloof from their pelebian sur- 
roundings, but we all rejoiced at the final arrangement of these 
articles, and settled down into a fairly contented sort of routine. 

So, that sparkling, joyous afternoon early in April, Virgie and 
1 started our explorations with clear consciences, and the happy 
feeling that we left behind us a house "in order." 

"1 could walk for miles and miles and miles," I cried, hopping 
over boulders and small bushes in my youthful enthusiasm at leav- 
ing the house and getting into the open again. "Let's go over every 
inch of the ground that we own, first, and then go way, way off 
in the depths of the forest." 

Virgie followed more leisurely, stopping to pick flowers here and 
there, or sniff some particular kind of crushed herb inquiringly, for 
even in her early youth my scientific sister showed the instincts of 
a naturalist, half-formed and half unconscious, and generally sup- 
pressed, because there were only certain prescribed interests for 
girls in those days, and anything outside of those interests would 
label a young lady very "queer," or "eccentric." 

1 believe 1 had been given up as a hopeless tomboy. I openly 
admitted the preference for boys' games to girls' ; played marbles, 
ball, climbed trees and ran races. Life at that time, was to me, 
one glorious picnic. I would much rather have been in the boys' 
pranks and games than with hannie or Virgie; but since the event 
of Luke, the boys openly scorned me, and Mama put her foot 
down with spirit, upon my racing around with the hired man. Fan- 
nie, always with an eye open for a "good time," spent many days 
with friends she had made in Rockdale; so Virgie and I were thrown 
much together. 

I" or awhile Virgie and I wandered along in silence, until we 
came across the mischievous brook, which brought us into trouble; 
for it was impossible not to follow when it whispered such allur- 
ing things, and follow we did. 

It was seemingly like many other little brooks that flowed here 
and there, all over those flower-strewn, green Sierra foot-hills. Com- 
ing from some mysterious source, they ran merrily between the 
rolling fields, pausing now, in a clear pebbly pool, to gather strength, 
then falling in miniature torrents over a rock into another pellucid 
cavity. Afterwards, we found that this particular stream emptied 
into a natural sink or swamp at the foot of the small hill where 
our house stood. 

"Let's see where this comes from," I proposed, and so all that 
cool breezy, joyous afternoon, we followed the brook, over rocks, 
through chaparral that tore and scratched us, and under swishing 
branches of pine and hemlock and tan oak, and elderberry and 
buck-eye. 



T" flf* ^f* "F 



Whoosh! swish! flip, flap! The owls had left their hollow tree, 
and like two ghostly spirits, were drifting slowly off among the 
pines. Ihe red light of the after-glow touched their breasts with 
a soft rose color, and their graceful, muffled flight amongst the green 
gloom of the forest made a picture that I shall never forget. We 
clasped our hands breathlessly. 

"Oh, how perfectly beautiful!" we cried. With a last faint flicker 
of white wings, the snowy mates vanished, and we were left alone 
to find our way back to the house. 

What more natural than to turn in the direction the owls had 
taken? And when, presently we arrived at home, with torn clothes, 
hair tangled and matted with leaves, dirty, and infinitely weary, 
even Mama's scornful unbraidings and Maggie's direful tales of 
what might have happened to two lone girls in "them woods," failed 
to depress us. 1 he sight of those snowy inmates of the forest, re- 
paid us for all the misadventures we had endured. 

But to this day my scientific sister says mysteriously, — "and the 
queer thing about it is, that as far as I know, Eleanor, there are no 
white owls in this part of California!" 

(lo be continued.) 



March 3, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




»«m«m««aMHiHMHH«paMiBaBB^ mm smmm 



Isolation Dreams 



By R. BERKELEY 



BBBBBSHElSBISilB!! 




ALTHOUGH the plight of the rest of the world is far less piti- 
able than we are being told, it may be admitted that — in 
material possessions at any rate — our country occupies an enviable 
position. We have emerged from the world war with few scars; 
we have added enormously to our national wealth; every other great 
nation has suffered a considerable diminution. Our unique posi- 
tion has unfortunately not brought with it an overwhelming sense 
of obligation to aid others on the road to recovery; it seems on the 
contrary to have created a feeling that we should take full ad- 
vantage of our good fortune, and that it is poor business to lend 
a helping hand to those whom the misfortune of war has placed 
to a certain extent at a commercial disadvantage. Leaving Chris- 
tianity out of the question, for the moment, the argument is sound, 
provided, of course, that we are sufficiently assured that we shall 
never have to seek a helping hand ourselves. When, however, we 
are told that we can follow this policy to the extent of completely 
isolating ourselves from the rest of the world, because we are so 
situated that we are altogether self-sufficient, a very little investi- 
gation of the facts of the situation show the danger of this megalo- 
maniacal attitude. 

The first point that may be considered is that over a period of 
ten years, the value of our export trade has amounted to a full 
tenth of our domestic production. Ten per cent does not seem 
much, but it makes all the difference between a full life and mere 
existence for our workers. Ask any business man what it means to 
have your market reduced by a tenth. It often means the difference 
between profit and loss in selling prices; it will mean, under the 
most favorable circumstances, the difference between a good profit 
and one that offers no inducement to produce. 

Another point is made by the advocates of isolation. Why should 
we not produce ourself the goods we import? Many of them we 
could, but they would cost producers and consumers alike more in 
effort. The slightest acquaintance with the elements of economic 
science tells us that it is better to concentrate on the production 
of those goods for which we have particular aptitude, or for the 
producing of which we have natural or other advantages, and ex- 
change them for those that others can produce under better cir- 
cumstances. The gain is obvious. To forfeit this gain in the sacred 
name of "independence" might be magnificent, it would certainly 
not be war. We could produce all the wool we need, we could 
doubtless in time produce all the sugar that even we require, but 
the added cost would be prohibitive. And, do not overlook this 
little fact, so doing would of course reduce the purchasing fund 
which enables other countries to buy from us. Reducing imports 
must eventually mean reducing exports; which would, as explained, 
mean lower prices for all the goods we at present export. 

Independence is a fool's dream, if attainable. As a matter of 
tact, it is not attainable. For the simple reason that we cannot 
produce all the things that we regard as necessities. We can hardly 
imagine the American without his coffee. To be "independent" he 
would have to drink one of the many substitutes, and we know that 
he will not until he is very sick. For we cannot produce coffee our- 
selves. Rubber, too. Where should we be without it? Are we not 
raising a fearful shout because some good friends of ours are 
wickedly suggesting plans for making us pay more for what we 
consider essential to our comfort? Furs? Ask your sister, or some- 



one else's sister, how she would love you if you deprived her of 
the chance of obtaining these, without a probable impossible trip 
to some less independent country? If pulp wood is mentioned, I 
personally would not kick if the supply were reduced. I fear, how- 
ever, that the average American would find life a dreary waste if 
he were confronted with fewer or smaller newspapers. A few other 
things with which we should have to dispense — if not altogether, 
nearly so — would be cocoa, tea, olives, bananas, tin. 

As for our exports, cutting them off — the inevitable sequel to 
ceasing to import — means loss of a market for nearly half the wheat, 
the tobacco, and the cotton which we produce ; also, for a very large 
portion of our meat, hides, and mineral products. We are, too, the 
largest suppliers of many classes of machinery, and the very life- 
blood of many of our manufacturing industries is derived from ex- 
port trade. From a purely economic standpoint, "independence" 
and "isolation" are impossibilities, and the sooner we cease to talk 
about self-sufficiency the better. Discussing, however, "isolation," 
we have a right to remind those other nations who sneer at us 
for the policy we are supposed to be aiming to adopt, that we are 
not alone in our espousal. Nearly every other nation is infected with 
the same poison, called by other names. 

What right, for instance, has Europe to throw "isolation" in 
our teeth? Is not every nation in Europe striving for isolation, self- 
centered nationalism being but a grievous form of isolation? Is 
not this beautifully clothed selfishness the real cause of all the trou- 
ble from which every one of them are suffering? What is the self- 
determination mirage if it is not a death-dealing reflection of iso- 
lation? Every nation is fighting for its own hand, seeking in some 
other nation the cause of its own suffering, instead of looking nearer 
home, lhe old mote and beam story. May one hope that the day 
is not far off when the peoples of the earth may begin to under- 
stand that the greatest curse which has afflicted humanity from the 
day of its beginning is the idea that any human being or group of 
human beings can live unto itself! Each is his brother's keeper, to 
the advantage of all. 



— An American actor used to tell of an amusing incident that 
occurred in the course of a performance by a company with which 
he was at one time connected. He had been understudying for the 
leading man. and it was his duty at a certain time to lift up the 
fainting heroine and convey her to the wings. At that time the actor 
in question was very slight and anything but strong, so when it was 
taken into consideration that the leading lady weighed nearly two 
hundred pounds, the task assigned him was no easy one. One evening 
after sundry attempts to accomplish this "business" assigned to him, 
which he had little hopes of doing, the strain was broken by the 
hearty laughter of the audience, for from the gallery a shrill voice 
had shouted, "For heaven's sake, man. take what you can and come 
back for the rest." 



THE HOME 

INaURANCt COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



■Tin- 



tmrgOBl Firr Insurance Company in 

\m«l it ;i" 



FIRE. AUTOMOBILE. WINDSTORM. 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



larch 3, 1923 




"LOVE" 

By Samuel Daniel (1562-1619.) 
(Note: Love hasn't changed much, has it, since Samuel sighed?) 

Love is a sickness full of woes, 
All remedies refusing, 
A plant that with most cutting grows, 
Most barren with best using. 
Why so? 

More we enjoy it, more it dies, 
If not enjoyed, it sighing cries. 
Heigh ho! 

Love is a torment to the mind, 
A tempest everlasting. 
And Jove hath made it of a kind. 
Not well, nor full, nor fasting. 
Why so? 

More we enjoy it, more it dies, 
If not enjoyed, it sighing cries 
Heigh ho! 



HAWAIIAN MUSIC 

Across the beach the ukuleles sound 
Their tremulous sweet wailings, and all eyes 
Are on the lissom, comely boy who lies 
Lazily on the sand, then at a bound 
Is up and dancing, smiling all around. 
The high-pitched Polynesian voices rise 
In hulas that befit the jeweled skies. 
Whilst Naihe's shapely feet caress the ground. 
What if those cadences give me a glance 
Of long-past lives of mine and revellings? 
Did I once dance that rhythmic, sensuous dance 
To such intoxicating, throbbing strings? 
I know not; yet how strange that it should chance 
That dance and song seem old, familiar things! 

— F. A. Carter. 



WISDOM 

It was a night of early spring; 

The winter sleep was scarcely broken; 
Around us shadows and the wind 

Listened for what was never spoken. 

Though half a score of years are gone, 
Spring comes as sharply now as then; 

But if we had it all to do. 

It would be done the same again. 

It was a spring that never came. 

But we have lived enough to know 

lluil what we never have, remains ; 
It is the things we have that go. 

— Sara Teasdale. 



COSTUME BALL AT HOTEL RICHELIEU 

On Friday evening several hundred of Hotel Richelieu guests 
and their friends enjoyed a Mardi Gras ball in the ballroom and 
art gallery of Hotel Richelieu. Some notable costumes were worn 
and novel ideas carried out. There was dancing in the Chinese, 
Venetian, ballroom and art gallery during the dinner and late into 
the night. Serpentine, favors, spring blossoms and asparagus plu- 
mosa were used profusely in a decorative way and on the dinner 
tables. 

Miss Vera Rhodes entertained twelve guests in the Tally Ho 
room. All were in costume, and as it was Miss Rhodes' birthday 
dinner, it added greatly. to the pleasure of the occasion. 

On Sunday evening Hotel Richelieu gave an enjoyable concert 
at which Mme. Lilian Durini accompanied Mr. Louis Leimbach and 
Shirley Hoppin Porter, tenor and soprano soloists. 



Y. M. C. A. PRIZE ESSAY CONTEST 

A prize essay contest, open to all boys of the city, has been started 
by the Pioneer Boys' Clubs of the city, which are sponsored by the 
San Francisco Y. M. C. A. The cleverest answer is sought to the 
query, "What is your idea of a first class police officer?" Answers 
must be limited to 100 words and should be in the hands of J. D. 
Foster, head of the Y. M. C. A. boys' division, by March 1 7. A 
free vacation at Camp McCoy, the annual boys' summer camp of 
the Y. M. C. A., is the prize offered for the best answer to the 
query. 

Judges will be Police Chief Daniel O'Brien, Superior Judge Frank 
J. Murasky, Mrs. Curtis D. Wilbur and Gus Lachman. 



UP-TO-DATE GARAGE 

The Sherwood Garage, at Jackson and Polk streets, opened their 
shop with a dance last Tuesday evening, February 27. This is quite 
an innovation for a garage, but Mr. Sherwood realizes that the 
pleasanter he makes the surroundings for his employes, the better 
service will be rendered, not only to himself, but to his patrons. 
Every convenience for the chauffeurs has been installed, so that 
they may be comfortable while waiting for calls. 



CLEAN-UP DAY 

Mrs. Robert A. Dean, chairman of civics of the City and County 
Federalioti of Women's Clubs, announces that San Francisco is con- 
ceded to be one of the most spick and span cities in the United 
States. It may be in some favored sections, but the writer has seen 
many streets in a most filthy condition. Mrs. Dean has been called 
to organize the forthcoming clean-up campaign, which was first 
instituled by Supervisor Mary Morgan, and we hope that when the 
women get busy it will be a regular old spring-cleaning proposition. 



HARDING APPOINTS S. F. BANKER AS MINISTER TO THE 
HAGUE 

Richard M. Tobin, San Francisco banker, clubman and mem- 
ber of a pioneer family of California, was nominated by President 
Harding as minister to The Netherlands, and the Senate promptly 
confirmed the nomination, according to word received from Wash- 
ington. 



— A year seems rather a long time to wait upon the installing 
of meters in all taxicabs. Can't the supervisors hurry this law up 
a little, for the protection of the public? 



Nearly 1-1 per renl of the quail's food for the year consists of 
animal matter, such as insects and then alius. I he quail has no 
superior as a weed destroyer. It is a good ranger and will patrol 
every day all the fields in its vicinity in search of food. 



March 3. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




Have You Heard It? 



mBBBOBBBBBBSMBBBISBIBBSSISm 

— For the best part of an hour the commercial traveler had been 
talking in his most persuasive and eloquent manner to a hard-headed 
old business man. The old fellow seemed to be pleased and con- 
vinced, and the traveler felt sure a big order would follow. However, 
at last the customer said, "There's my lad, Ah'd like him to hear 
what ye have to say. Will ye coom this afternoon and go over your 
talk again?" "Certainly, sir," replied the traveler, and at the hour 
appointed duly presented himself for the interview with the father 
and son. Once again he went over the points of the article he had 
for sale — eloquently, persuasively, and forcibly; never had he ac- 
quitted himself so well. When he had finished the old man, turning 
to his son, said enthusiastically, "Do you hear that m' lad? Well, 
now, that's the way I want ye to sell our goods on the road." 

* * * 

— A party had been persuaded, much against his will, to go to a 
sale with his wife. When they arrived at the shop his wife told him 
to wait for her about the entrance for a few minutes. "I won't be 
long," she said, as she tripped away. Two hours later found him still 
waiting for her, but by this time his temper was frayed to breaking 
point. Streams of frantic women passed and repassed him, pushing 
him this way and that, but although he tried to look in all directions 
at once he failed to discover his wife. At last, unable to bear it any 
longer, he stamped into the shop and marched up to an immaculate 
shopwalker. "I've lost my wife," he snapped. The shopwalker's face 
took on an expression of profound grief, but he answered at once: 
"The third floor and turn to the left for the mourning department." 

— A man carrying a small handbag entered the St. Francis Hotel 
barber shop and proceeded to take various things out of the bag. 
"I don't think I want anything today," said the barber. The other 
showed him a bottle. "This is very fine bay rum," he said. "Pos- 
sibly," said the barber, "but I've got plenty." "Shaving soap?" said 
the other, producing a packet. "No, thanks," replied the barber. 
"Face powder?" queried the caller, producing another packet. "No, 
its no good," said the barber, "I must get rid of my present stock 
first." Apparently undaunted, the other produced various other things 
— a bottle of hair tonic, a pot of pomade, and tube of face cream, 
etc., etc. "No, no, no," said the barber in desperation, "I don't want 
any of those things." "I know you don't," was the calm reply. "Then 
why do you ask me to buy them?" said the barber, angrily. "I didn't 
ask you to buy them," declared the other. "I only came to have a 
shave and a hair-cut, but I wanted to show you before we started 
that I'd got all the toilet articles I want." 

* * * 

— A man had a parrot of which he was very proud, and which he 
had skilfully instructed to say many interesting things. An uncle, 
from whom he had expectations, was coming to stay with him, and 
he thought it would please his uncle if he could teach the parrot to 
say "Good morning, uncle." Accordingly, he said to Polly, "Say good 
morning, uncle." The parrot said, "Good morning." "Good morning, 
uncle." The parrot simply said, "Good morning." Over and over 
again the man repeated. "Good morning, uncle." The parrot, how- 
ever, refused to say the word "uncle." The man raved and swore, 
lost his temper, and taking the parrot by the neck, took it into the 
garden and threw it into the chicken house. He returned later in the 
day considerably calmed down, and went to get Polly and restore 
the bird i<> its cage, [o his dismay be found all the chickens dead, 
with then necks wrung, except one. whom Polly was clutching, say- 
ing. "Say good morning, uncle. Say good morning, uncle." 




By KEM 

TIME was when the tired business man — presidents like Roose- 
velt and Woodrow Wilson, lawyers and judges, read mystery and 
detective stories to forget dogging cares — but now femininity eager- 
ly following masculine leading, has in part forsaken the "softer- 
appeal" fiction and girlish voices are heard daily calling over library 
telephones: 

"Save me something exciting — full of crimes" — or "Two nice 
murders, please. — I'll be in for them today." 

Since a mystery or detective story is largely written for the plot 
and as Anna Katharine Greene tells reviewers "it is a damaging 
thing to tell it before the author intended it to be told," I will give 
merely a hint of 1923 titles that only satisfy in part the insatiable 
demand of sensation-loving readers of both sexes. 

* * * * 

The so-called "More Advanced Readers" who joy in the moral 
confusion of our world, who love to see fair standards dropped 
with a dish-breaking thud, and who through curiosity hope that the 
"advanced" few writers who have thrown off all restraint may have 
something to give of real human interest, are asking for Sherwood 
Anderson's "Many Marriages," for any book of J. H. Lawrence — 
new or old, for Cabell's fantasies or Dreiser's dreary realisms. It 
devolved upon a pretty, modern woman to awaken a San Fran- 
cisco bookshop this week by asking for "the latest book by Simon 
called Peter." She wanted "PERADVENTURE." the book just out 
by Robert Keable, whose first book by the Biblical name is still 
being widely read and discussed. "Peradventure is just a hash of 
religious discussion," one fair reader complained. "Only one page 
in it with a real thrill — hardly worth wading through all that Sun- 
day school stuff for that!" "It's the best book he's written yet" 
cry the more thoughtful readers — and so it goes. Published by Put- 
man. $2. 

* * # # 

THE STEP ON THE STAIR by Anna Katharine Greene, who has 
had so many years of success in supplying "spine-chillers" since 
her famous "Leavenworth Case" received world-wide attention. This, 
her latest story, is a complicated affair in which two men of iden- 
tical names contribute to the complications along with many other 
well-tested mystifving expedients. Published by Dodd. Mead. Price 

$2. 

¥ * * * 

MYSTERY AT GENEVA by Rose Macaulay. who has already 
won a host of admirers with her novels POTTERISM and DAN- 
GEROUS AGES. These admirers rather question this lair 
a not-happy departure. The regular "mystery-fan" resents it as 
being too "high-brow", but the mass of readers who like a well 
told mystery story that is mapped out on rather a larger scale than 
the ordinary movie-thriller will find this is one to widen their hori- 
zon and that they will have to finish it if they once start it. Pub- 
lished by Boni Liverwrighl. $1.73 



Books th 
1 Post 


it are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

Street San Francisco 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 3. 1923 




'Har&CmrtlOollKikvi 'trt Oouf 

Oat (btLwdlfby Ux dcvil.sir. *ilb jon 



— How is it that this so called "mystic" stuff in spite of ex- 
perience and all that sort of thing, still maintains a hold on the 
imagination, and more than that, on the purse of so many people 
in a community such as this? 1 know that we are not as bad as 
Los Angeles in this matter, but outside of that strange city I don't 
suppose there is another place in the world where so-called mystics 
have such a good time and are able to get so much pay for their 
funninesses. Here we have the case of a man calling himself Le Roy, 
locally, but with at least two other aliases, who calls himself a "Hindu 
Mystic" and is able to get away with it; marries the wife of a 
Napa county rancher, gets into trouble with bad checks and beats 
several Yuba county people out of $500 each for fake cures. No- 
body could approach that sort of a record without an unusual 
recipe for getting at the confidence of people. That recipe is 
"mysticism." Yet we do not clamor for the protection of such. It 
would seem that they should reap the rewards of their own folly 
and thus learn. At least that seems to be our theory. But such 
liberality does not lead us to regard the cashing of bad checks with 
any particular toleration. 

* * * 

— It is quite remarkable how everybody is becoming ill at the 
Wilkens trial. Two jurymen, or rather one man and one woman 
juror, have dropped from the tale owing to the influenza and now 
the judge is on the sick list. And so say all of us. We are all 
sick of the Wilkens business and of the case which was so largely 
manufactured in the papers and played up to by the law officers. 
Of course unlike the scribes of the daily papers we have no views 
on the matter of the guilt or innocence of the party charged, but 
we do have most distinct views on the scandalously filthy way in 
which this case has been played up ever since the killing of the 
wife of the defendant. Now the papers have abandoned the whole 
subject when every bit of sensation has been wrung from it and it 
goes to join the Arbuckle case in the hell of the forgotten. But 
before dropping it the papers managed to create as much dirt as 
could be got together and infected large portions of the youth of 
the community with vicious ideas which will remain with them 
through life. 

— Judge Graham, who is always to the fore when questions of 
relations between the sexes come up, and who takes no end of in- 
terest in smaller matters which do not interest many judges, declares 
that breaches of promise cases are here relatively few in number. 
He explains this in one of two ways: either the male is less of a 
heart-breaker or the ladies of San f-rancisco have harder hearts. It 
is rather an awkward dilemma. For the sake of the women one 
would hardly like to declare our men lacking in the gentle art of 
breaking hearts; for the same sake, it won't do to say that our 
women are relatively insensitive. Ihe reason must be found some- 
where else. I think it will probably be found in the fact that most 
of our people are still in the adventure stage and are not put out 
with such minor matters as jilting. Moreover I think also that we 
have a much larger number of women capable of and ready to 
make their own living without reference to any male. These, there- 
fore, would feel a certain shame. about capitalizing their heart-hurt 
in terms ol money when they are well able to pay their own way 
and have their hearts mended en route. With all deference to Judge 
Graham, 1 am more inclined to put the matter on economic grounds. 



— Few of our foreign colony have ever deserved better of San 
Francisco than Ettore Patrizi, editor of L'ltalia. So we note with 
great satisfaction that his countrymen gave him a farewell dinner 
on the eve of his departure for Italy. A man of great ability as 
well as of great integrity and the most affable disposition, Mr. 
Patrizi has not only contributed greatly to the education and edi- 
fication of his countrymen, in his very able daily, but had aided 
us all by the opportunity, which he has on many occasions given 
us, of seeing and hearing the best specimens of modern Italian art. 
Without his aid we should not have been able to enjoy such ad- 
vantages in those ways as have come to us, much more than our 
share in proportion to our population. His paper is one of the finest 
foreign papers in the United States. We wish him a joyous visit 
to his native land and a happy return. We can afford to receive 
many like Patrizi from Italy, and elsewhere, to our own advantage. 

— Now they can search your automobile without a search war- 
rant and they can enter your house and search it without a search 
warrant and stuff taken without a search warrant may be held as 
evidence against you, for the supreme court has decided that evidence 
is evidence no matter how it has been obtained. The Town Crier 
is a good citizen, he believes in obedience to the law as the prime 
essential of orderly conduct. But there comes a time when one 
may have a little too much of a good government. My house is a 
place in which 1 am entitled to privacy, my carriage or machine is 
a place which is also, so to speak, a prolongation of my house; it 
belongs to me and my family and does not impinge on the com- 
munity. I object most strenuously to a government even of arch- 
angels interfering with my private abode except by lawful warrant. 
It is a liberty 1 have, as an Anglo Saxon. A liberty for which my 
fathers fought and died and I object to being Latinised or Slavised 
into abject servitude. 



SAN FRANCISCO'S STREET RAILWAY PROBLEMS 

The people of San Francisco in the adoption of the present city 
charter committed themselves to the gradual acquisition and ulti- 
mate ownership of the public utilities serving the city. 

The first step in carrying out this policy was construction of the 
Geary street line of the Municipal railway. 

Encouraged by its success, and urged by the necessity of provid- 
ing transportation to the Panama-Pacific exposition, the so-called 
exposition lines were constructed, and to this nucleus there has 
been added from time to time other extensions, so that now the city 
owns and operates sixty-seven single track miles of street railway. 

This municipal railway system represents a book value of ap- 
proximately $7,000,000 for the construction of which $5,520,000 
was provided from bond issues, the balance from earnings. The 
bonded indebtedness has since been reduced to $4,390,100. 

A unified system, with the control and management under one 
head, presents many advantages both in improved service to the 
public and economy in operation. Among these advantages are: 
First, the possibility of the most direct service between any two 
points, by rerouting certain existing lines and the establishment of 
a universal transfer system. Second, greater economy in opera- 
tion due to possibility of rerouting cars over more direct lines, 
elimination of parallel operation, and the abandonment of certain 
portions of lines now operated merely for the purpose of preserv- 
ing franchise rights. Third, as before touched upon, making pos- 
sible the logical extension of traffic facilities into many districts 
that are now being stunted in their growth by lack of street rail- 
way service. 



— More than half of the sugar consumed in the United States 
comes from foreign sources. 



March 3. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 



;< k Srti.M.tjii >t >i K k « x in ii x x x x x x x xxx X x x 



A Morning s "Catch" At Fisherman's Wharf 

By ANNA AVIS ODELL 



TVI ESTLING at the foot of San Fran- 
X i Cisco's tenanted hills, within sight of 
the Golden Gate, and within hailing distance 
of the world's commerce; snuggling up close 
to Fort Mason, and under the very guns 
of the fortress of Alcatraz — serene and secure 
lies Fisherman's Wharf. God made the scal- 
lop when he formed the coast line, and man 
has since spanned it with wharves from 
which dance hundreds of fishing smacks, 
equally fascinating in sunshine or fog. 

Even the way there is satisfying if one is 
in tune. You may see almost anything along 
the somber way, and your curiosity will be 
aroused by the big-bellied stoves at the 
edge of the curb — that's where the fish- 
mongers "boil em alive." 

Fisherman's Wharf like everything else that 
belongs to San Francisco has its own indi- 
viduality that cannot be lost in the cosmic 
whole. 

Doubtless it is logical that the fishermen 
should be, and are, Italians, and the Italian 
colony gives a written guarantee that you 
will catch whatever you are fishing for, 
whether with reel or net for the finny beau- 
ties of the deep, or with canvas and brush 
for local color and perspective, or with pad 
and pencil for inspiration, metaphor and 
simile — they all are there just as surely as 
that every fisherman is an artist and that 
every artist is a fisherman. 

Fisherman's Wharf is a delightful place 
on which to just saunter and pick out your 
ferryboat friends among the gulls and note 
their loose moral code if a successful fish- 
erman happens to be disposing of his 
"catch." The most respectable and gullible 




Fisherman's Whm-1' 



looking gull would rather snitch a fish than 

dive for it. 

* ¥ ■¥ 

And what can't one imagine about the 
little boats that bob and dance? Their very 
names may conceal or reveal a romance. Is 
"Conchita" a memory or a hope? Has 
"Anita" ever seen Fisherman's Wharf? And 
could a fisherman offer more sincere homage 
than to name his boat "Marconi"? 




I'nloadlng Fish 



Even the nets spread out to dry have a 
bit of fascination — they seem "next of kin" 
to the kelp and seaweed. And the patience 
and skill with which our adopted brothers 
mend their nets and the neatness with which 
they coil their lines command our admira- 
tion. Like the Galilean fisherman they toil 
at night, so morning finds the thrifty house- 
wife driving shrewd bargains, in a leisurely 
manner and musical tone. 

Pages could be filled, but I want to leave 
something for each newcomer to discover, 
even now the fog is lifting, and one is hun- 
gry- 

* * * 

Every fish stall offers oyster cocktails but 
if they are only "teasers." there are many 
Italian restaurants fringing the wharf and 
fronting on Powell street. 

Having re-enforced your belts with strange 
but delicious viands, stroll back to Fisher- 
man's Wharf and enjoy the wonderful pic- 
ture the Master Painter unrolled along the 
shores of Marin county, just across the bay. 
for the sun and the trade winds have dis- 
sipated the fog, and if you have an imagina- 
tion you can look through the Golden Gate, 
as through a telescope, and see all that lies 
beyond, and even vision the future. 

Some one. who doubtless knows, says that 
il ia u awful thing to have an imagination. 
bul worse not to have. But any one with- 
out an imagination would never have a de- 
sire to see Fisherman's Wharf. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 3. 1923 




ociot 




busy rrpin 

SIMPSON-KNOWLAXD — The marriage of Miss Louise C. Simp- 
son of Alameda and Joseph Russell Knowland Jr.. son of the 
former Congressman and Mrs. Knowland of Oakland, which 
took place last Wednesday in Sacramento, is of interest in 
society, college and business circles both here and Oakland. 
Rev. Dr. Bennett of Sacramento read the marriage service. 
The couple have returned and young Knowland, who is a 
junior student and a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
fraternity at the University of California, will resume his 
college course. The wedding is the result of a romance which 
had its inception at the Alameda high school. 

KNOX-WILSON — Miss Janet Knox and Mr. Benjamin Wilson 
were married at the Charles E. Knox home in Berkeley on 
Friday evening of last week. The news of the wedding came 
as a complete surprise to friends, who expected Miss Knox 
to marry the young easterner in June, as originally planned. 
With his father, Myron T. Wilson of Cleveland, Ohio, young 
Wilson arrived in California a week ago, and plans for a 
hastened wedding were formulated. The bride had as her 
only attendant her sister, Mrs. Rollin Moore of Oakland. 
Rev. Dr. Lundy read the ceremony at S:30 o'clock Friday 
evening in the presence of a few intimate friends and mem- 
bers of the family. John Bryant Knox, brother of the bride, 
was best man. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson will make their home 
in Cleveland, where the bridegroom is engaged in business. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are now motoring in the south. 

HOBART-CROCKER — Miss Ruth Hobart and William H. Crock- 
er, whose engagement was announced recently, were a much 
feted couple over the week end at Pebble Beach, where Mr. 
Crocker has a charming Italian villa overlooking the bay. 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Templeton Crocker chaperoned a house 
party that included Miss Hobart among the guests. Mrs. 
William H. Crocker and Miss Helen Crocker, who will leave 
soon for Paris, plan to return early in May. No date for the 
Hobart-Crocker wedding has been made, but in all probabil- 
ity it will be an event of the month of June, traditionally 
dedicated to brides. As the engaged couple belong to two 
families foremost in society's activities, the engagement pe- 
riod will be marked with many affairs in their honor. 
LIXCHEOXS 

NICHOLSON — One of the interesting events of last week was 
the large luncheon at which Miss Carrie Nicholson entertained 
in the Woman's Athletic Club. Seventy-five guests accepted 
her hospitality. 

GRANT — Mrs. Joseph D. Grant gave a luncheon last Friday in 
honor of Mrs. Whitelaw Reid, who left this week for the east. 
Twenty guests were entertained at the affair, which was held 
at the Grant home in Broadway. 

DODGE — Mrs. William Shuman, the former Miss Cornielia Clam- 
pett, and Mrs. Howard McCandless, who was Miss Doris Wirt- 
ner, shared honors Tuesday at a luncheon at which Mis, 
Douglas Wilson Dodge entertained. The party was held at 
the home of the hostess and afterwards the guests enjoyed 
several rubbers of bridge. 

MINER — Commander and Mrs. Randolph Huntington Miner, who 
are enjoying an extended sojourn at Monte Carlo, were re- 
cent luncheons hosts when they entertained a party at Giro's. 
Their guests included the Marquis and Marchioness of Hunt- 
ley, Mrs. Burke Roche. Mr. and Mrs. C. Augustus Spreckels. 
Captain and Mrs. Charles Harlow, Mrs. Gertrude Lowndes, 
Miss Frances Jolliffe, Marquis d'Alcedo, Mr. Lloyd Lowndes 
and Mr. Stanley Carlton-Matthews. 

KING — Mrs. Homer King gave a luncheon last Friday al her 
home in Broadway, when she entertained a group of old 
family friends, many of whom were present at the celebra- 
tion of the golden wedding of Mrs. King's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith Brown, of Napa, twentv vears ago. 
TEAS 

KNIGHT SMITH — Miss Betty Knight Smith will entertain the 
members of the school set at a tea over which she will pre- 
side this Saturday afternoon. The party will take place at 
the residence of Dr. and Mrs. Reginald Knight Smith in 
Jackson street. 



WEATHERWAX — Following the polo game in San Mateo Sun- 
day. Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Weatherwax gave an impromptu tea 
at their home in Burlingame. Among their guests were Mr. 
and Mrs. Cyril Tobin, Mr. and Mrs. Parmer Fuller, Mr. and 
Mis. Walker Salisbury. Mr. and Mrs. George Gordon Moore, 
Mr. and Mrs. George Nickel. Mrs. Grace Hutton, Frank Hut- 
ton and Charles Fulton. 

DINNERS 

SMITPI — Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hays Smith have issued invita- 
tions to a dinner dance at which they will entertain Satur- 
day evening. The party will be held at the Burlingame 
Country Club. 

de ROPP — Complimenting Miss Olive Edrington, who arrived 
Saturday from the Atlantic Coast, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred de 
Ropp entertained at a dinner Wednesday evening. Miss Ed- 
rington will be here for several weeks as the guest of Mr. 
and Mrs. Horace Davis Pillsbury. Mr. Evan S. Pillsbury III, 
fiance of Miss Edrington. will arrive Saturday from the north 
to spend the week end at his parents' home. 

QI'ARRE — Mr. and Mrs. Oswald George Quarre celebrated the 
first anniversary of their wedding on Washington's birth- 
day with a dinner given at their home in Arguello boule- 
vard for ten of their friends. Mrs. Quarre was Miss Kath- 
erine Mohun. daughter of Dr. and Mrs. C. C. Mohun. 

PRESTON — Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Preston, who make their 
home at the Belgravia apartments, gave a dinner Monday 
night at the St. Francis for Captain and Mrs. George Lan- 
denberger and Mr. and Mrs. George Bos. The hosts and 
their guests attended the opera during the evening. 

CROCKER-— Many dinner parties are being planned before the 
Mi-Careme ball, the ball of roses, which will be given on 
the evening of March 7 at the Hotel St. Francis by Mr. Wil- 
liam H. Crocker, Mr. Richard McCreery and Mr. Charles 
Templeton Crocker. Among those who have issued invita- 
tions to dinners before the dance are: Mr. and Mrs. Richard 
Heimann and Dr. and Mrs. Alanson Weeks. 

DOE — In honor of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Prather. who will leave 
shortly to make their home in Dallas. Texas, Mr. and Mrs. 
Alvah Doe entertained at a dinner Tuesday evening. The 
party was held at the home of the hosts. 

CLINE — Mr. and Mrs. Alan Cline entertained at an informal 
dinner Monday evening at their home in Filbert street when 
they had as their guests Mr. and Alts. Charles Christin. Mr. 
and Mrs. Drummond MacGavin, Mrs. Frank Ryan. Mr. Walter 
MacGavin, Mr. Robert Calhoun and Dr. Russel Ryan. 
M \H JONGG 

EAVES — Mrs. James Eaves entertained Wednesday, when she 
gave a large mail Jongg party at her home. 

FAGAN — .Miss Mabel Hathaway, whose engagement to Mr. Louis 
Jefferys was recently announced, was the guest of honor at 
a bridge and mail jongg party given Tuesday afternoon by 
Mrs. Paul I. Fagan at her home in Buchanan street. 

WALLACE — Mrs. Bradley Wallace entertained at a mah jongg 
party at her home in Webster street Wednesday afternoon. 

KING — In honor of her sister-in-law, Mrs. Ralph King, Mrs. 
Joseph Libbey King Jr. entertained at a mah jongg party 
and tea on Thursday afternoon. The affair took place at the 
home of the hostess in Pacific avenue. 

CIRARD — Mrs. Olney Girard and Miss Lynda Buchanan were 
hostesses at a bridge and mah jongg party Wednesday after- 
noon. It was a farewell affair for Mrs. Prather. 




Under the guidance of R. H. Collins and his as- 
sociates, the Peerless was bound to be a better 
and better Peerless. The public response came 
quickly and is indicated by augmented sales in old 
Peerless strongholds and throughout the country 
in general. 

1'iorvERR Motor Company 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

1900 Van Ness Ave., Corner Washington St. 
Telephone Prospect 8800 



March 3. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



PLI'MMICK — .Mrs. Harold Plummer entertained six tables of 
bridge and mah jongg Monday afternoon at her home in 
Baker street and again entertained a similar affair Tuesday 
afternoon, when the same number of guests enjoyed her 
hospitality. 

IX TOWN AMI OUT 

PARK — Mr. and .Mrs. Howard Park have been visiting with Dr. 
and Mrs. ('. C. Park at their home in Montecito. 

CAMERON — Mr. and Mrs. George Cameron and Miss Mary Forbes 
and Miss Carlo Shaw returned from the south, where they 
have been for a week. 

NEVILLE — Mr. John P. Neville passed the week end at the 
Montecito Country Club. 

PARROTT — Mrs. William Gregory Parrott took her departure 
Monday for New York, where she will join Miss Helen 
Crocker, who preceded her to the Atlantic Coast by several 
weeks. 

SHAINWALD — Mr. and Mrs. Richard Shainwald Jr., Mr. and 
Mrs. Moses Heller and Dr. and Mrs. W. C. Voorsanger left 
on Sunday for Portland to attend the wedding of Joseph 
Ehrman Jr. and Miss Jean Meier. 

HAMMOND — Mrs. John Hays Hammond and her niece, Miss 
Mary Hoyle. arrived in San Francisco Monday for a several 
weeks' stay and are at the Fairmont Hotel. Mrs. Hammond 
recently arrived in Santa Barbara from her home in Wash- 
ington, D. C, and will be in California for several months. 
Since coming west she has been ill and came to San Fran- 
cisco for a change of climate. 

BARNARD — Col. and Mrs. Joseph H. Barnard are interesting 
visitors in San Francisco who will be here until the next 
sailing of the transport Thomas, early next month. During 
their visit they are living at the Hotel St. Francis. Colonel 
Barnard will be stationed in Peking, China, for the next sev- 
eral years, where he will be assistant American military at- 
tache to Col. Parker G. Tenney, U. S. A. 

GALLOIS — Mr. and Mrs. John Gallois returned to their home 
in Russian Hill on Sunday, after passing the week in San 
Rafael as the guest of Mrs. Gallois' mother, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Norris. For the past several years Mrs. Norris has made her 
home in San Rafael, where she bought the Roger Bocqueraz 
home. 

CHILLON — Mrs. Howard Chillon of Montreal, Canada (Maisee 
Langhorne), left for the east Monday. She was called west 
on account of the recent passing of her father, Mr. James 
Potter Langhorne, and has since been the guest of her moth- 
er, Mrs. Langhorne, at her home in Pacific avenue. Mrs. 
James Parker, who was Miss Julia Langhorne before her 
marriage, arrived on the same day with her sister, and left 
about ten days ago for her home in Annapolis, where her 
husband. Commander Parker, is on duty at the Naval Acad- 
emy. 

FORD — Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Ford returned to their home 
in San Mateo on Monday, after passing the week end as the 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Ford at their ranch near Mer- 
ced. 

DOYLE — Mr. and Mrs. Richard Doyle (Gladys Sullivan I are home 
from their honeymoon and are residing on Sacramento street. 
They visited Noel Sullivan in Paris and were much teted by 
the Californians, of whom there is quite a colony, while in 
the French capital. 

LUND — Consul general of Denmark, Mr. Fin Lund. Mrs. Lund 
and the latter's mother. Mrs, Breen, took their departure 
on Saturday for a several days' stay in the southern pari of 
the state. 

KYNNERSLKV — Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Sneyd Kynnersley and their 
daughter, -Miss Edith Kynnersley. who have been Spending 
the winter at Coronado. where they had an attractive cot- 
tage, have returned to their home in this city. 
FOLGER — Mr. and Mrs. Ernesl G. Folger and Mr. and Mrs 
Alexander Hamilton returned last week after a Fortnight's 

sojourn at Coronado. 

FOERSTER — Mr. and Mrs. Roland Poerster, who chaperoned 
a party of young people to summit for a few days of winter 
sports, are h»me with their party much pleased with the 
on tins 

HIGGINS — Mr. and Mrs. Marvin H Hlgglns, who went to New 
York via Panama, thoroughly enjoying the ions; ocean voy- 
age, have returned and are at the Fairmont. 

POND— Mr. and Mrs, John Pond (Lillian Hopkins) are at the 

Fairmont for a short time pending the completion ot their 
borne at s.m Mai.,. The Pond wedding was an event 
tew week ago, following which the newlyweds went east. 
Visiting in New York. Washington and elsewhere. 



POLLOCK — Mrs. Mildred Pollock, who has been abroad for 
months, returned home Tuesday and is making her home at 
the Fairmont Hotel. 

INTIMATIONS 

DODGE — Mrs. Douglas Wilson Dodge will leave shortly for Kan- 
sas City, where she will visit her old home. Later she will 
go to New York to remain for a several weeks' sojourn and 
she will return to San Francisco about Easter. 

SEARS — Miss Eleanor Sears, who has been visiting in California 
for a few weeks, left on Sunday for New York. She was 
accompanied by Miss Marion Hollins. who has been spending 
several weeks in Californila, dividing her time between Del 
Monte and Santa Barbara. Miss Sears came north last week 
with Mrs. Charles W. Clark, whose house guest she had been 
at Pebble Beach. 

BURNHAM — Mrs. John Bright Burnham arrived from her home 
in Salt Lake City on Friday to visit her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. L. P. Grunbaum, at the Fairmont Hotel, for a week or 
ten days. Her mother-in-law, Mrs. Addison Burnham of Bos- 
ton, arrived in California last week, and is visiting members 
of her family on the other side of the bay. 

AMES — The many friends of Miss Frances Ames are distressed 
to learn that she is suffering from an acute attack of ap- 
pendicitis and is at one of the local hospitals. Miss Ames 
is the daughter of Mrs. Harry H. Scott and a cousin of Miss 
Josephine Drown. 

BROWN — Mr. and Mrs. Junius Brown, former San Franciscans, 
'who have been visiting in San Francisco for the past several 
weeks, took their departure Monday for their home in New 
York. They passed the week end at Del Monte. 

PILLSBTJRY — Taylor Pillsbury is coming home from the east 
for the Easter vacation, and in all probability Mrs. Moseley 
Taylor of Boston will come west at the same time. She lv 
coming here to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. George A. 
Pope. As Emily Pope, she was one of the most popular 
belles of society a few seasons ago. 

DEL MONTE — The regular Del Monte spring golf tournament 
is to be held March 9 to 11. Many entries are now being 
scheduled and the smart set are getting ready for a round 
of social functions in connection with the event. 
Sir Paul and Lady Dukes of New York City are recent ar- 
rivals at Del Monte Lodge. Lady Dukes was Mrs. Ogden Mills 
of New York, daughter of -Mrs. William K. Vanderbilt. 
Mr. and Mrs. Augustus Taylor. Mrs. Eugene Murphy and 
George Pope motored to Del Monte on Friday to pass the 
week end. 

Sir Frank and Lady Barnard of British Columbia have re- 
turned to Del Monte, after spending some time in Havana. 
Mrs. n. C. Jackllng, .Mrs W. S. Porter and Miss Cornelia 
O'Connor are at Del Monte for a few days. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 

S'«ai Am., lit Geary street BAD FBANCI8CO 

[a the most refined Family hotel m the city 
— a home unsurpassed 

BLMEB M. WOOIUH RY MiifiHK" 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Rreervatioas at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Slitter « 1 30 tndpr Management CARL S. STANLEY 



A real 
guarantee 



part of 
every ti i n all of 

■ 

Ileal ti> id mod- 

ern equipment will make 

wh.it \v ■ 

lubltshed 
centun 




i^o/Goo^ 53 



«. It I f-nnim.ir»* A. K. r>nnlmr»rr 

J %\ Davl* 

^.n rrintl.ro - 1 S 1 PhI, 1508 Million SU. 

Berkeley - - - - * 10« Sbattark Av.oo. 

Oakland - IStl Bmdwi; 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 3, 1923 





l£INANCIAy 




By P. N. BER1NGER 



REPORTS from banks all over the coun- 
try, and especially those reaching me 
from California, show a marked improve- 
ment in business and as I write the story 
comes from Wall Street that there, too, the 
vivifying influence of better business has been 
felt and is being predicted in increasing 
measure for the future. 



What It Shows 

This improving condition everywhere is a 
very strong additional proof that France has 
taken the right step as regards Germany. 
The world at large refuses to become alarm- 
ed because England's little game with Ger- 
many, in aiding her to make a voluntary 
bankrupt of herself to the. unending loss 
of France, has failed in its purpose. Ger- 
many is being made to pay her debts and 
it is only a question of time when she will 
be forced to her knees completely in the 
economic war. And then will probably be- 
gin a most wonderful amalgamation of pro- 
ductive industries to the detriment of all 
competitors by French and German interests. 
Those who are interested in these matters, 
and all should be, are asked to read Sy- 
mond's article in the Review of Reviews. 



Where Ignorance Is Bliss 

The newspapers of this and other coun- 
tries have allowed themselves to be used by 
the German and British propagandists. As 
far as American newspaperdom is concerned 
it has been amply shown that there is no 
real knowledge as to the European and Near 
Eastern situations in the editorial noodles. 
It is a clear case of proving that "where 
ignorance is bliss it is folly to be wise." 



Advertising Which Pays 

Californians Incorporated has shown the 
world, in a very strong way, that advertis- 
ing pays. California is now advertised as it 
never was before and the results are already 
seen in increased inquiry and in a tide of 
increasing travel to the cities and the vast 
agricultural valley of the northern part of 
the state. The one big double page spread 
in an eastern weekly paper, together with a 
number of other advertisements in other 
newspapers, and the publicity matter which 
has accompanied these advertisements, did 
their work well — keep it up. 



The Building Activity 

Building activities are on the increase in 
and around San Francisco. The architects 
offices are crowded with draughtsmen and 
others preparing plans for business struc- 



tures and dwellings. Never before has such 
activity prevailed as is now the fact in the 
regions about the bay of San Francisco. 
Suburban building has already begun, many 
weeks ahead of the usual time for such 
work, and this is an indication of the fact 
that 1923 will be a banner year as far as 
the housing question is concerned. If it 
were not for the constant influx of new- 
comers the housing question would be near- 
ing its solution but the newcomer is com- 
ing in such an increasing number that a 
great deal more housing room will be need- 
ed for him than lias apparently been pro- 
vided by the busy architects and contractors. 



San Francisco's Population 

The population of San Francisco is being 
added to straight along through these peo- 
ple who are coming in from all quarters of 
the globe. San Francisco's natural increase 
in population, through births, is helping the 
big influx and San Francisco must have more 
elbow room. She is spreading southward 
along the peninsula with a remarkable speed 
and this is seen by those who motor toward 
San Mateo county. Already this great growth 
has manifested itself beyond the confines of 
the city and county of San Francisco and 
indeed in Oakland and all of the other cities 
bordering on the bay and all of the smaller 
suburban communities as well are feeling 
the breath of newer and more energetic ex- 
istence. 



The Need of Highways 

Mr. Toy, of the highway commission, has 
suggested that the great pike leading south 
should be widened by forty feet and this 
has been met enthusiastically by all, but that 
is not enough. The city needs three or four 
good roads leading to the south and it should 
have them. It means money to San Fran- 
cisco and to the whole of the bay region 
that these roads should be furnished, and as 
quickly as they can be built. 



Our Forgotten Assets 

We have many forgotten assets and we 
persist in ignoring those that obviously scream 
for attention at our hands. Take Mount 
Tamalpais and the whole Marin county 
country, as instances. If Los Angeles pos- 
sessed anything like Mount Tamaloais, as 
a "pulling" item, she would be working the 
advertising of the mountain overtime. We 
do not, most of us, have the ability, appar- 
ently, of realizing what a wonderful thing 
this mountain is to us and what the sur- 
roundings for miles could be made to mean 



in advertising the beauties of scenery about 
San Francisco. Imagine Los Angeles pos- 
sessing a feature such as Mount Tamalpais 
and letting the management of the resort 
and railroad close down operations for 
months during the winter. Yet that very 
thing occurred this winter, at a time when 
the tide of travel of tourists should be at 
its greatest in California. The city of San 
Francisco and the management of the Tam- 
alpais railroad are in a like case — both, it 
seems, have forgotten the value of sound 
advertising and seem to have forgotten how 
to properly entertain the stranger in our 
gates. 



The Deadly Average 

I was told last week that the average 
"stopover" of the traveling stranger in Los 
Angeles was ten days and that the average 
"stopover" of the same individual was only 
three days in San Francisco. Why this dif- 
ference? Is anyone going to attempt to argue 
Los Angeles has more to offer to keep the 
stranger within her gates? No, we all know 
she has not nearly as many "sights" to show 
him but we do know she really knows how 
to show these while we do not know how. 
And a great number of San Franciscans do 
not seem to care a rap about it, anyhow. 



The Financial Aspect of It 

The banks are interested in keeping the 
stranger with us as long as possible. Have 
these banks taken any active interest in 
holding the stranger longer with us? Have 
the hotels used a proper and effective co- 
operative means to do the same thing? Have 
the merchants done anything in that line that 
is flagrantly visible to the naked eye? You 
tell us. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter, Just Out 

370 Bush Street 

Phone Kearny 172 5 San Francisco, Cal. 



Mayerle's 




Expert Optical Service and 

Scientific Eye Examinations 

960 Market Street 

29 Years in San Francisco 



March 3. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 

ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 

LAST POPULAR MUNICIPAL CONCERT 

Exposition Auditorium 

Saturday Kvc, Miirrh 3, tit 8:'io 

ZIMBALIST 

Russian Violinist, Guest Artist 

WAKKKN 1>. \I,l.i:\ 

Stanford Organist, at the Ornan 

Reserved Seats $1, 75c, ">0c, and 25c 

(No War Tax I 

Now on sate at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s 

] Erection Auditorium Committee, 

Board of Supervisors 



ANDREWS & LASH 

Producers of Multigraphed Letters that 
possess personality 

1209 Chronicle Bids. Suttcv (5324 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
The Mineral Development Company, lo- 
cation of principal place of business, San 
Francisco, California, 

Notice is hereby given that at a regular 
meeting of the directors held on the 13th 
day of February, 1923, an assessment of 
one-half cent per share was levied upon 
the issued capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in legal money of the 
United States, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, Room No. 237 
Monadnock Building, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. 

Any stock on which this assessment 
shall remain unpaid on the 20th day of 
March, 1923, will be delinquent and ad- 
vertised for sale at public auction, and 
unless payment is made before will be 
sold on Monday, the 16th day of April, 
1923, to pay the delinquent assessment, 
together with costs of advertising and ex- 
pense of sale. 

M. J. SEELY, Secretary, 
237 Monadnock Building, 
San Francisco, California. 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



Nl MMONS 

No. 138768 
In the Superior Courl <<f the State of Cal ■ ■ 
In and Cor the city and County of San Fran 

Cisco. 

Ray Mui\ -a m\ , pie mi jit, \ s i -ra M ulvan? 

fend ant. 

Action brought in Hi.' Superfoi Court <>f 
the State of California in and Eoi 

and County of San Francisco, and thi compl 

filed in the office of the County Clerlt ol ss d 
City and County. 

The Peqple of the State of California s.-ud 
Greeting to; Ora Mulvany, defendant 

\ mm are hereby directed to ippej 

swer th iplafnt in an action entltl 

above, broughl against you in tii<- Sup 
< 'mill of I he State "f * California, in and fo 
City and County of San Fran tiln ten 

days after i he service on j I I ; 

— if served within this Cltj and I 
within thiri j served elsewhere. 

And you are heU ebj notified that unless 
appear and answer as above required, tin 
Plaintiff will take judgment for any nao 
damages demanded In the complatnl 
upon contract or will ippl irt for 

ana other relief demanded in the complaint 

Given under my hand and seal of the Superior 
Court at the Clt] 
State ol 

Dated February it, i 
(Seal) it i mi, ;<-rk. 

Bj J, v Dunworth, Deputy* Clerk. 
AUSTIN LEWIS Attorns) Cor Plaintiff. 

Mills Building, San Francisco, California. 



FILM FLICKS 

By AGNES KERR CRAWFORD 

MILDRED HARRIS, ex-wife of Charlie 
Chaplin, arrived in San Francisco on 
Friday to begin work in the leading femi- 
nine role of '"The Fog," now being filmed 
at the Pacific studios by the Graf Produc- 
tions. This appearance marks Miss Har- 
ris' return to the silver screen after an ab- 
sence of eight months, and she says she is 
more than glad to get back to California 
and the movie world. A week's work is al- 
ready accomplished on the picture, and Paul 
Powell, who is directing, reports that so 
far the progress of the picture is most sat- 
isfactory. 



Edward Philips, who is playing a promi- 
nent part in "The Fog," owes the fact that 
he isn't having his close-up taken through 
the bars entirely to Louis Gray's — president 
of the Gray Productions — standing with "the 
powers that be" in the courts, for Philips 
is only used to quiet cities like New York 
and Los Angeles so can't seem to learn the 
traffic laws of San Francisco, and he and 
his little Ford coupe have been arrested 
regularly twice a day ever since his arrival 
a week ago. 



The third two-reel picture of the series 
being made from Peter B. Kyne's stories, 
by the Paul Gerson Corporation at the Ger- 
son studios on Page street, is almost fin- 
ished. The title is "Tib's Conscience." 
Craig Hutchinson is directing, and Orral 
Humphrey is being featured, with Ruth 
Stonehouse as the new leading woman, and 
a cast that includes Rupert Drumm, George 
Webster, Eddie Harris and Carl Kroenke. 
Peter B. Kyne himself will title the pictures. 
'The Cricket on the Hearth," being made 
oy the Gerson Corporation at Universal City, 
is now being titled and cut. 



Cullen Landis, playing the juvenile lead 
in "The Fog," is experiencing one of the 
queer contrasts of the picture actor's varied 
life. For in "The Famous Mrs. Fair," his 
last picture finished just before he came to 
San Francisco, he was the beloved and 
adored son of a home of luxury; from which 
he jumped to being in "The Fog" the son 
of an absolutely different home, poor and 
squalid, with parents who constantly mis- 
treat and abuse him. 



Eric Von Stroheim's return to San Fran- 
cisco has been a little delayed, but he, with 
fifty members of his cast and staff, will 
be here and ready to begin work March I 
on the filming of "McTeague." 

N. Dragomanovich. head of the West 
Coast Films, returned from a business trip 
to Los Angeles last Sunday, and will soon 
be ready to announce the future production 
plans of the company. 



HOTEL PIA7A 

San FRANCISCO 



65c 

Luncheon 



Cood food, quiet pleasant 
surroundings and careful 
prompt service. 
Post Street at Stockton. 




Teeth 



A mi n ute examination of your teeth 
made .several l imps a year will enable 
you to arrest any incipient disease of the 
gums before it has a chance to reach the 
acute stage. Our examinations are free. 
If there is no immediate need for our 
services there will be no charge. We are 
always pleased to talk it over. Red gums 
or ho re teeth sometimes lead to serious 
disorders. Watch your teeth. You will 
like our nerve blocking system; It takes 
a way all the pain hikI keeps you happy. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
s\\ FRANCISCO 

Phone Garfield 835 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; frowns; 
Self Cleansing Itrldgen; Porcelain Work 
and ItooflcftM rin i ■ - 



Quality 1866-56 Years— 1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

llnrlinramr Kedwood City Menlo Park 

Ban Mateo Woodslde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works : 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Franrlaco Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 148* 

Economy Durability 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a little better than teems necessary" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
are sold in similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets Order through your printer or 
stationer, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
rtT-4.1 First Street - - San FrancUcc 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 3, 1923 




PI/EASUKE/S WAND 



Columbia 

Profusely peppered with profanity, highly 
colored with the red coats of Canadian 
mounted police, sprinkled sparingly with hu- 
mor and touched up a bit with the required 
amount of romance, Willard Mack's new